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Topic # 127203 2-Aug-2013 12:54
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Hi guys

I've been adding some extra network cables around my house (bundles of 3 cat6 + coax) and as they go under the house have been wondering what would be best to use to seal the holes in the floor i have fed them through?

I used a 22mm spade bit so the gap isn't huge, but i want to pack it with something to stop any possible rising damp issues


Is a product like Selleys Space Invader going to be safe to have in contact with the PVC plastic of these cables?
Or should I just pack some of that foam draught stop tape in the gaps?


What do you think?

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  Reply # 870652 2-Aug-2013 12:58
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When doing Ministry of Ed jobs we would stop up larger holes with soft seal foam. Just cut it to the right size and jam it in. That way it is nice and easy to pop out if you want to add more. Would hate to try and get rid of expanding foam.

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  Reply # 870833 2-Aug-2013 16:25
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And there is no way of knowing where that expanding foam will end up!!!

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  Reply # 870899 2-Aug-2013 18:07
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YES the Selleys space invader foam is perfectly fine to use, and when it's dry you can trim the excess off with a Stanley knife

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  Reply # 870929 2-Aug-2013 19:06
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Hi I would avoid expanding foam if you can, simply because its hard to remove in future. With the MoE jobs (as Sam/Chevrolux) refers to, use green polyester insulation batting to stuff in the gap.

Cyril

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  Reply # 870967 2-Aug-2013 20:54
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I was led to believe foams have a negative long term effect on the plastic sheaths. With Cat5 I've seen places where insulation tape has caused deterioration. And I'd think that's less harsh than foams.



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  Reply # 870994 2-Aug-2013 21:43
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Thanks guys

Sounds like a foam collar is the way to go

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  Reply # 871202 3-Aug-2013 13:59
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expanding foam is a prick to clean out, tried that myself and hated it when it came time to add more cables.




Richard rich.ms

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  Reply # 874268 8-Aug-2013 21:54
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chevrolux: When doing Ministry of Ed jobs we would stop up larger holes with soft seal foam. Just cut it to the right size and jam it in. That way it is nice and easy to pop out if you want to add more. Would hate to try and get rid of expanding foam.

Really? I thought ministry specs required T-dux or greenstuff, and banned foam... normally we use green stuff if its just a hole in the floor. You may need Firepro or similar if its going through a firewall.

Anyway, "rising damp" is only caused by water soaking up through porous materials such as masonry. A hole in the floor is more likely to bring in fresh air along with insects etc so a bit of insulation that has insect/rodent repellant properties would do the job. Any kind of expanding foam would definitely shorten the life of the cable jacket and cost way more than it needs to.




Qualified in business, certified in fibre, stuck in copper, have to keep going  ^_^

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  Reply # 874330 9-Aug-2013 08:04
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Hi, MoE specs require T-Dux for pits or ducts that come up under in in buildings that will be exposed to wet, but if largely dry green polyester wadding.

Cyril

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