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BDFL - Memuneh
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  Reply # 76559 2-Jul-2007 10:45
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I agree... I have a DVS here without the heater, and it blows a cold air. Almost have to put more money in for heating, I'd say...


 





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  Reply # 76564 2-Jul-2007 11:29
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Our Weiss system stops blowing air below a certain temperature. I can't tell what it is as it is all automatic. My mate has a DVS and he had to turn it down as it was blowing cold air on cold days....




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  Reply # 76639 2-Jul-2007 19:09
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We have an HRV system. The DVS G3 wasn't available when we had our unit installed. Our choice was easy, but if the DVS G3 system was available at the time then I think our decision may have been harder to make. Both systems are basically the same. They take warmer, drier air from the ceiling space and push it through the house. This effect dries out the interior of the house, including the water in furniture, curtains and carpet etc. Drier air is easier to heat, so our heating bill is considerably cheaper than it was prior to using the HRV. Neither unit has a dehumidifier built in, they just keep air circulating. There is no ‘air conditioning’ performed at all, other than the filter that air passes through before it enters the house. There are varying levels of filtration available in the DVS right up to F6, and unless things have changed, just a top notch F6 Filtration system in the HRV. The inline heaters both systems have available (optional extras) only take the edge off the air temperature and will rarely be enough to actually heat your house. Neither HRV or DVS seem to push the heater units as they know the advantages are minimal. DVS are agents for ‘Econo-Heat’ heat panels which we have been using since the HRV system has been installed. A 425W panel controlled by a $4 24hr timer from Mitre10 Mega is enough to keep a bedroom sorted out in the heating department even though they aren’t on constantly during the night. On the coldest night we’ve had so far this year the HRV control panel showed that we had 3degs in the ceiling, but still 14degs in the house, and we hadn’t started using heaters by this stage. This house is over 30 years old and has no insulation in the walls.

I don’t think it matters which brand you go for, as long as the air is filtered. The DVS G3 and the HRV system can both have outlets installed in multiple rooms. We have 6 outlet vents, one in each bedroom (4), one in the lounge/dining area and one downstairs in my office (computers run cooler with the better air flow and of course the air is drier which is always good for electronic devices!). Both the HRV and G3 (and perhaps some other DVS models) control the rate of air flow depending on weather the required efect is heating or cooling. We also have a summer kit with our HRV system, which is also available for the DVS G3 system (also perhaps other DVS models).

I think the name ‘HRV’ is a bit misleading though as true ‘heat recovery’ has nothing to do with just pumping hot air from one place to another. In my understanding true ‘heat recovery’ uses a process to remove heat from one medium (water, air etc) and convert that recovered heat into energy. But that’s being fussy!

The old way of doing it was to leave windows open (never a security issue in the ‘old days’), power was cheap and firewood was free!

My 23c worth. Cheers.

Ben

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  Reply # 76660 2-Jul-2007 21:23
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I might design one of these systems properly myself (already done in half an hour during today on my N95 phone - PIC, ULN Line driver IC to drive the mains control relays, 2x temp sensors, Hygrometer and an LCD driver and an oLED display) and get it made in China for 1/4 the cost and put these crowds out of business.


Got a schematic?  And where do you get the bits from?  Seriously.  I've just built myself a PIC programmer, and am looking for an application to use it for :)

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  Reply # 76661 2-Jul-2007 21:26
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NeoTech: I think the name ‘HRV’ is a bit misleading though as true ‘heat recovery’ has nothing to do with just pumping hot air from one place to another. In my understanding true ‘heat recovery’ uses a process to remove heat from one medium (water, air etc) and convert that recovered heat into energy. But that’s being fussy!


You are right. There are true HRV systems around - for example. (Page is a frame hence lack of navigation links.)

"Dried rodent urine 'dust' will pass right through almost any air filter". Ugh.




 

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  Reply # 76679 2-Jul-2007 23:05
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NeoTech: We have an HRV system. The DVS G3 wasn't available when we had our unit installed. Our choice was easy, but if the DVS G3 system was available at the time then I think our decision may have been harder to make. Both systems are basically the same. They take warmer, drier air from the ceiling space and push it through the house. This effect dries out the interior of the house, including the water in furniture, curtains and carpet etc. Drier air is easier to heat, so our heating bill is considerably cheaper than it was prior to using the HRV. Neither unit has a dehumidifier built in, they just keep air circulating. There is no ‘air conditioning’ performed at all, other than the filter that air passes through before it enters the house. There are varying levels of filtration available in the DVS right up to F6, and unless things have changed, just a top notch F6 Filtration system in the HRV. The inline heaters both systems have available (optional extras) only take the edge off the air temperature and will rarely be enough to actually heat your house. Neither HRV or DVS seem to push the heater units as they know the advantages are minimal. DVS are agents for ‘Econo-Heat’ heat panels which we have been using since the HRV system has been installed. A 425W panel controlled by a $4 24hr timer from Mitre10 Mega is enough to keep a bedroom sorted out in the heating department even though they aren’t on constantly during the night. On the coldest night we’ve had so far this year the HRV control panel showed that we had 3degs in the ceiling, but still 14degs in the house, and we hadn’t started using heaters by this stage. This house is over 30 years old and has no insulation in the walls.

I don’t think it matters which brand you go for, as long as the air is filtered. The DVS G3 and the HRV system can both have outlets installed in multiple rooms. We have 6 outlet vents, one in each bedroom (4), one in the lounge/dining area and one downstairs in my office (computers run cooler with the better air flow and of course the air is drier which is always good for electronic devices!). Both the HRV and G3 (and perhaps some other DVS models) control the rate of air flow depending on weather the required efect is heating or cooling. We also have a summer kit with our HRV system, which is also available for the DVS G3 system (also perhaps other DVS models).

I think the name ‘HRV’ is a bit misleading though as true ‘heat recovery’ has nothing to do with just pumping hot air from one place to another. In my understanding true ‘heat recovery’ uses a process to remove heat from one medium (water, air etc) and convert that recovered heat into energy. But that’s being fussy!

The old way of doing it was to leave windows open (never a security issue in the ‘old days’), power was cheap and firewood was free!

My 23c worth. Cheers.


The above sums it up really well. We went with a company called healthaire. see healthaire.co.nz for more info
The guy who started HRV used to be the sales manager for Healthaire. Due to disagreements about sales and marketing
he left and set up HRV. I also believe he was taken to court over some legal issues. healthaire is owned
and run by a husband and wife team. No salespeople who don't have a clue, no telemarketing etc. Just a bit
of Radio advertising and mainly word of mouth.

Remember all these systems are PPV systems
True HRV is www.cleanaire.co.nz




"In the end, it's not the years in your life that count. It's the life in your years." -
  --  Abraham lincoln

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