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Minimalist
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  #1066711 16-Jun-2014 15:18
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I'm KEEN AS!



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  #1066716 16-Jun-2014 15:29
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scottjpalmer: I'm KEEN AS!


If you truly are a minimalist, then it makes sense :)

 
 
 
 


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  #1066718 16-Jun-2014 15:33
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KiwiNZ: With the cost of mortgages and traditional homes prices I can see a day in NZ that we have US style trailer parks


Their are number already South and West Auckland all ready have them. 

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  #1066734 16-Jun-2014 15:36
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NZ has heaps of land, so there is no reason in live in tiny houses. I can see it in high population areas, but not in regular suburbs.The way to bring down house costs, is to reduce the price of materials, and compliance costs. Not simply make them smaller. You do get better economies of scales building larger too. We don't want to end up with trailer park towns. Some of these small building get around the need for building consents, because they are so small and there is a loophole, but I don't think they are a good idea, because legislation will need to change to also cover them.

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  #1066740 16-Jun-2014 15:46
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For those who want to live in a small house they should be free to do so as long as they meet the regulations and provide  a warm, dry, healthy environment.




Mike
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The views stated in my posts are my personal views and not that of any other organisation.

 

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  #1066742 16-Jun-2014 15:50
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mattwnz: NZ has heaps of land, so there is no reason in live in tiny houses. I can see it in high population areas, but not in regular suburbs.The way to bring down house costs, is to reduce the price of materials, and compliance costs. Not simply make them smaller. You do get better economies of scales building larger too. We don't want to end up with trailer park towns. Some of these small building get around the need for building consents, because they are so small and there is a loophole, but I don't think they are a good idea, because legislation will need to change to also cover them.


It's not just about land usage, or monetary cost.  The actual material required is less, the impact on the land is less also.  The guy in the doco who builds one for himself owns a large tract of land in Colorado... there are no space issues in the US either.

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  #1066747 16-Jun-2014 15:56
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ubergeeknz:
mattwnz: NZ has heaps of land, so there is no reason in live in tiny houses. I can see it in high population areas, but not in regular suburbs.The way to bring down house costs, is to reduce the price of materials, and compliance costs. Not simply make them smaller. You do get better economies of scales building larger too. We don't want to end up with trailer park towns. Some of these small building get around the need for building consents, because they are so small and there is a loophole, but I don't think they are a good idea, because legislation will need to change to also cover them.


It's not just about land usage, or monetary cost.  The actual material required is less, the impact on the land is less also.  The guy in the doco who builds one for himself owns a large tract of land in Colorado... there are no space issues in the US either.


Also lower energy costs.
I realise that, although there are people who are looking at these sorts of ideas to solve NZs housing problems. My point is that they aren't the answer for that. If you look at third world countires, they live in very small houses, but they aren't necessarily well built, or healthy environments.. I think a countries wealth is partly based on the quality and livability/ health of their houses. We don't want our standard of living to go down, which may happen if we develop low cost trailer park towns, or small prefabs.

 
 
 
 


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  #1066749 16-Jun-2014 15:59
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KiwiNZ: For those who want to live in a small house they should be free to do so as long as they meet the regulations and provide  a warm, dry, healthy environment.

 

I beleive you can build a small structure and not need any form of consents if it is under a certain size, and roof height is below a certain amount, and it is moveable. I recall seeing something about a company investigating importing chinese built prefabs into NZ, which didn't need building consnet due to their size. Not sure if they need to meet NZ building codes if they are except from building consents.

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  #1066751 16-Jun-2014 15:59
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mattwnz:
ubergeeknz:
mattwnz: NZ has heaps of land, so there is no reason in live in tiny houses. I can see it in high population areas, but not in regular suburbs.The way to bring down house costs, is to reduce the price of materials, and compliance costs. Not simply make them smaller. You do get better economies of scales building larger too. We don't want to end up with trailer park towns. Some of these small building get around the need for building consents, because they are so small and there is a loophole, but I don't think they are a good idea, because legislation will need to change to also cover them.


It's not just about land usage, or monetary cost.  The actual material required is less, the impact on the land is less also.  The guy in the doco who builds one for himself owns a large tract of land in Colorado... there are no space issues in the US either.


Also lower energy costs.
I realise that, although there are people who are looking at these sorts of ideas to solve NZs housing problems. My point is that they aren't the answer for that. If you look at third world countires, they live in very small houses, but they aren't necessarily well built, or healthy environments.. I think a countries wealth is partly based on the quality and livability/ health of their houses. We don't want our standard of living to go down, which may happen if we develop low cost trailer park towns, or small prefabs.


Small does not need to mean substandard. If the regulations are put in place and observed to ensure a good standard is maintained then this can be a viable option and could to some degree alleviate the housing problem we are developing here in NZ.




Mike
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The views stated in my posts are my personal views and not that of any other organisation.

 

He waka eke noa


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  #1066783 16-Jun-2014 16:26
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We added a really nice guest bedroom to our holiday place using an old refrigerated container, its already insulated, we just put in a ply floor and ripped the doors off and got a ranchslider made to fit. Its warm in the winter and cool in the summer. While I think councils would have kittens, there must be a market for something like this (assuming they can be built to look visually ok for the area they are going into). You could have a modular type of house, ordering the modified container you need as go. Need another bedroom or bathroom , just order the module have it dropped off and connected up.

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  #1066801 16-Jun-2014 16:49
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mattwnz:
KiwiNZ: For those who want to live in a small house they should be free to do so as long as they meet the regulations and provide  a warm, dry, healthy environment.

I beleive you can build a small structure and not need any form of consents if it is under a certain size, and roof height is below a certain amount, and it is moveable. I recall seeing something about a company investigating importing chinese built prefabs into NZ, which didn't need building consnet due to their size. Not sure if they need to meet NZ building codes if they are except from building consents.


When last I looked the floor area had to be under 5 sqm...so other than a shed pretty much impossible.  Local council bylaws would never permit it, and property developers prohibit this through covenants to protect house values and quality of the resulting development.  Other argument is it would create 'slums' if whole neighborhoods were established like this (as has happened in the past).  I guess that's why the only option is 'temporary' accommodation on wheels.  Just drive around any beach holiday destination and these 'tiny' houses are everywhere, all on wheels, and no intention to go anywhere.  Makes a nice cheap bach.  

I applaud the concept, but the reality is a whole different matter sadly.






Always be yourself, unless you can be Batman, then always be the Batman



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  #1066875 16-Jun-2014 18:18
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I make yurts for a living as well as part time IT work.

A lot of our customers are intending to live full time in them.  We have recently managed to get two of our structures permitted as permanent dwellings.

Even if a building is on wheels it is not technically a legal dwelling unless regularly moved ( caravan parks etc may have special permits for long term occupation).  In my understanding, to live in a structure long term on a fixed site you must pass the normal code regs whether you are on wheels or not and regardless of size.

As well as the cheap cost of building, the main attraction to tiny houses is that they can be moved if needed.  Many people don't own the land they have the structures on and the property often does not have the correct permits for additional dwellings.  It's nice to know if circumstances change you can move your house.  You can have your own home without having your own land.

The movement is much bigger than many people realise as most tiny houses are hidden due to lack of permits.  There would be a huge amount of creativity in housing if the permitting system was more flexible.  

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  #1066878 16-Jun-2014 18:21
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scuwp:
mattwnz:
KiwiNZ: For those who want to live in a small house they should be free to do so as long as they meet the regulations and provide  a warm, dry, healthy environment.

I beleive you can build a small structure and not need any form of consents if it is under a certain size, and roof height is below a certain amount, and it is moveable. I recall seeing something about a company investigating importing chinese built prefabs into NZ, which didn't need building consnet due to their size. Not sure if they need to meet NZ building codes if they are except from building consents.


When last I looked the floor area had to be under 5 sqm...so other than a shed pretty much impossible.  Local council bylaws would never permit it, and property developers prohibit this through covenants to protect house values and quality of the resulting development.  Other argument is it would create 'slums' if whole neighborhoods were established like this (as has happened in the past).  I guess that's why the only option is 'temporary' accommodation on wheels.  Just drive around any beach holiday destination and these 'tiny' houses are everywhere, all on wheels, and no intention to go anywhere.  Makes a nice cheap bach.  

I applaud the concept, but the reality is a whole different matter sadly.




There are exemptions from building consent laws to allow for "sleepouts" etc, but one of the main limitations is that if there are sanitary fittings or "kitchen", then it becomes a "dwelling" and consent is required.

Having a "tiny house" on wheels gets around this problem short term.  Longer term then I expect councils will enact legislation (if they don't already have it) to prevent people living in unconsented "tiny houses" anywhere except a caravan park.



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  #1066881 16-Jun-2014 18:24
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I would love to get a couple of these and put them out opening onto the pool deck. Problem is they would have to be about 2m in the air at the back side of it to get there and I think that might be taking the micky with being portable somewhat.




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  #1066883 16-Jun-2014 18:28
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I might, conceivably, look at something like this as a holiday house if I ever bought a piece of land near a lake or the sea. But as a main dwelling, not a chance. I'm too much of a packrat, and I need much more space than that.

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