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  Reply # 1067512 17-Jun-2014 14:15
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That would do my head in.  I need sense of space.  After two rainy days in our caravan I am ready to dismember family members with my bare hands.

How do you have guests over?

Small volume of air and humidity levels would build up very fast, so a high air change rate would be needed to provide a healthy environment.

I agree houses are generally bigger than they need to be but the Tiny house is a bit of an extreme reaction to that. 




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  Reply # 1067564 17-Jun-2014 14:46
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Not really Imo. I spend most of my time at home in the bedroom which is about the size of the tiny houses. Don't use the kitchen much. Why have people over when you can go out places?




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  Reply # 1067596 17-Jun-2014 15:12
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graemeh:
PhantomNVD: Anyone know the rules on having a permanent shed (say below the 10 sq/m 'unconsenting' size) to house all the 'permanent' fixtures (like your power/water/phone/internet linkup right next to a 'tiny house'/caravan + container on an otherwise empty piece of land?

I'd like the option of using this for 3-6 months while building my new house on the 2 acre plot we have already bought, and save on double moving (using a decent spec 20 foot container for storage) and use the rent saved to effectively pay for the 'temporary' sleeping accomodation which would later make a great sleepout/granny flat :)


My parents did something along those lines in Tauranga.

They got a permit for and built a "shed with facilities".  It was basically a one bedroom house/car port but legally it was a shed that had shower, toilet and kitchen.  They lived in it for years and I'm not sure if they ever built a "house" on the site.

This was on a lifestyle block so I don't if the rules are different.


Yep, mine is zoned "Rural" so would be the same... did they not have a 'proper' house there first?

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  Reply # 1067690 17-Jun-2014 16:32
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What is it about getting a building consent that people don’t like? Is it the time frame? Cost? I haven’t seen the show so i’m not sure what the rationale is. Is it to do with being able to lease land rather than having to buy it?

Whilst I am uniquely qualified to do my own work (i’m an architect) I don’t think it’s as daunting as people seem to think. 

In fact, i’m looking at buying some land and building on it, however i’ll get it all consented but maintain the small(er) footprint. Mostly due to the fact that I couldn’t afford to build large even if I wanted to. With a bit of thought, and some luck, I think i’ll be able to build smaller dwellings as the funds allow and then a final stage which links them together properly if required.

Building a smallish dwelling (over 10m2) shouldn’t be a huge expense particularly if you don’t venture out of the standard acceptable solution details.

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  Reply # 1067700 17-Jun-2014 16:40
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I'm not against a resource consent for a fixed dwelling.

A lot of those tiny houses are on trailers, having to have consent for anything like that I would not be happy about.

Taking it for a WOF to VTNZ might raise some eyebrows and an afternoon full of conversation.

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  Reply # 1067740 17-Jun-2014 17:23
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Disrespective: What is it about getting a building consent that people don’t like? Is it the time frame? Cost? I haven’t seen the show so i’m not sure what the rationale is. Is it to do with being able to lease land rather than having to buy it?


It's not too bad if you use "accepted solutions: like batts for insulation and standard framing arrangements.  The problem arrises when you come up with an original and creative idea (this goes for all structures, not just tiny ones).  Even an idea that has been proven for thousands of years is no good without scientific data.

Even though our yurts can stand up in a storm or earthquake, are warm in the far south in snow and dry in torrential rain, that means nothing.  We were forced to use a more expensive and heavier insulation material because there is no r value on the best material for the job.  We've had building inspectors look at our products and admit that they work brilliantly and are very warm and dry but because we didn't have scientific tests to explain why they were so good (very expensive process) they didn't get a tick.



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  Reply # 1067745 17-Jun-2014 17:28
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I might point out, that living in a Tiny Home is a belief set and a lifestyle choice  - its not a solution for people that cant afford a house.  

For example, I am into self sustainability and sufficiency and all that stuff, so a small plot of land to but a bit of a garden in and a cottage type dwelling (similar to the old railway workers cottage that one can find around Christchurch) would suit me just fine.  Also, there is a bit of a design philosophy and a do-it-yourself mentality.   The optimum space for living in is a rectangular box - which any architect will probably specify, but if one gets on youtube and types in "tiny house" as a search term, one will see that all shapes and sizes are used except (for the most part) rectangular boxes.  This is because one is building soul and feeling in to the home as well as a living space.





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  Reply # 1067792 17-Jun-2014 18:30
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Disrespective: What is it about getting a building consent that people don’t like? Is it the time frame? Cost? I haven’t seen the show so i’m not sure what the rationale is. Is it to do with being able to lease land rather than having to buy it?

Whilst I am uniquely qualified to do my own work (i’m an architect) I don’t think it’s as daunting as people seem to think. 

In fact, i’m looking at buying some land and building on it, however i’ll get it all consented but maintain the small(er) footprint. Mostly due to the fact that I couldn’t afford to build large even if I wanted to. With a bit of thought, and some luck, I think i’ll be able to build smaller dwellings as the funds allow and then a final stage which links them together properly if required.

Building a smallish dwelling (over 10m2) shouldn’t be a huge expense particularly if you don’t venture out of the standard acceptable solution details.


The building consent costs and especially TIME and rigmarole around meeting 'specs', for a home I will inhabit myself, and (especially if it's a 'tiny home'=moveable one seem to be an exhorbitant part of the building process, for which the payee gets little or nothing in return for their expense.

If I'm following documented and approved processes, and get the certifiable work (plumming/gas/electric) certified by licensed professionals, building 'certification' shouldn't cost more than a good biulding inspector charges to inspect a prospective "built" house that was done built before building consents even existed!

I.e. I currently live in a 1950's small DIY built house that has now stood for over 60 years and never required a building permit to build (and has no council registered plans or details) and you can happily buy it (actually listed on TradeMe now) and all you'd likely want or need to 'certify it' (should price and location suit) would be a decent building report and LIM... so why I can't build another house in my next property and have it checked by the same standards (and cost) I really DON'T understand???

Yes, building practices have changed, but if it's inspected by a registered/certified builder, why couldn't it happily be consented for a fraction of the current costs councils charge?

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  Reply # 1067799 17-Jun-2014 18:40
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Because idiots buy cheaply built things and the bleat for a govt and council handout when it leaks.

IMO the solution to that is less involvement by the council not more, but that's a whole different story.




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  Reply # 1067804 17-Jun-2014 18:51
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I think the consent process is more to protect the next owner of the home, and possibly quite a few owners after that, not just the person that builds it.





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  Reply # 1067815 17-Jun-2014 19:14
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TwoSeven: I think the consent process is more to protect the next owner of the home, and possibly quite a few owners after that, not just the person that builds it.



I'm on the fence on that. I can see why but I can also see why not. Ignorance is not bliss and if you aren't diligent when shelling out big bucks for a mortgage it shouldn't be someone elses problem to resolve unless there was clear motive to mislead in the purchase process.



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  Reply # 1068425 18-Jun-2014 13:29
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Lot less housework to do as well
No extra beds to keep covered, discourages guests and other room-leechers ..

I'd be quite happy in a converted 40ft container on a semi-rural block of land .... maybe a couple of extra 20ft containers for a workshop / utility rooms.

Been watching the smaller-home movement for a while, not everyone needs 3-4 room dwellings with multiple bathroom falilities, etc. Our parents generation managed quite well on small 3br homes, half the size of those currently touted in most current building developments.

Developers will put on bigger houses becuase by the time all the levies, and developer costs to council are paid, there is little difference between a small and large dwelling.

ie $300,000 for development costs on 500sqm section before building - doesn't really matter if a house costs 200K or 400K, it's still 500k upwards for an average house.




My thoughts are no longer my own and is probably representative of our media-controlled government


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  Reply # 1068428 18-Jun-2014 13:37
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sdav: I saved the "Tiny House" on Netflix last night too. Will watch it tonight I think.


Is that "We are the tiny House People" ?




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  Reply # 1068472 18-Jun-2014 14:12
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Here is an example of why building consents peeve people off.  We were  recently quoted $2,000 for some reasonably simple work on our house to address a roof leak.  The council's estimate of consent fees was >$1,500.  ie at least 75% of the repair work.  And also add in a 2 - 3 week delay.




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  Reply # 1068495 18-Jun-2014 14:33
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MikeAqua: Here is an example of why building consents peeve people off.  We were  recently quoted $2,000 for some reasonably simple work on our house to address a roof leak.  The council's estimate of consent fees was >$1,500.  ie at least 75% of the repair work.  And also add in a 2 - 3 week delay.
Wow, that is a high quote. Typically consent fees are based on the cost of the work. Looking at the Wellington city council fees for a category one building (basic), Drainage and Plumbing under $2k should be $299, and any work under $10k should be $357. There might be some inspection fees but there's no way that would make up the difference. 

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