Geekzone: technology news, blogs, forums
Guest
Welcome Guest.
You haven't logged in yet. If you don't have an account you can register now.


Filter this topic showing only the reply marked as answer View this topic in a long page with up to 500 replies per page Create new topic
1 | 2 | 3

gzt

10311 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 1584


  Reply # 1097539 28-Jul-2014 22:56
Send private message

To compare properly you really need to know which colorsteel product they specify. There is probably a good reason for the selection. Some areas do have slightly different regulatory requirements, for maximum wind etc.



10 posts

Wannabe Geek
+1 received by user: 1


  Reply # 1097541 28-Jul-2014 23:01
Send private message

The colour is 4mm, the house is sitting in high wind zero. If i ask them to detail the price difference, is it a fair question to ask?

 
 
 
 


14450 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 1899


  Reply # 1097568 28-Jul-2014 23:41
Send private message

It does largely come down to the look. Longrun will likely look better on more houses, and tiles may only look good on certain designs. Certainly tiles  probably wouldn't look that good on anything really modern and architectural.  Colour steel is baked on paint, and is very durable. I don't know anything about the tile company you mention, however pressed metal tiles I have see don't look that great as they are made to look like concrete tiles, and they get lichen growing on them, so I suspect the maintenance costs in keeping them lichen free is going to be higher. Also is the cost saving for the full installation, or just the material cost. Are the tiles made for NZ conditions and do they have a guarantee? What is the percentage saving, as a figure saving doesn't really mean much as depending on the roof, it may only represent a 10% difference.
Also I think the warranties may differ quite a bit depending where you live, it appears coloursteel offer a pretty good warranty if you are inland. I can imagine repainting tiles in the future maybe more work than repainting long run.

3270 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 1281

Subscriber

  Reply # 1097579 29-Jul-2014 00:35
One person supports this post
Send private message

iiylee: It is very hard to build the trust with companies. But it is also hard to know everything and get everything done by myself. This company has been recommended by a lot of people I know. So far our communication is good and efficient. If just compare this two products purely, what is your suggestion? Thank you.


If all you want is a yes / no answer, Then go with the longrun roofing.

Steel tiles just look cheap to me. I can tell just driving down the road which houses have steel tiles and which ones have real tiles. And they have the worst features of both: You still have to paint them and keep them clean like you would with longrun. And you have the problems with dents, grit in the gutters, pipe penetrations through the roof, that you don't have with longrun. Also in 10 years time will you still be able to buy that exact same pattern tile? With longrun you will never have that problem.

14286 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 2590

Trusted
Subscriber

  Reply # 1097631 29-Jul-2014 08:10
Send private message

Personally I'd go with long run steel, it's proven and low maintenance. I would ask why tiles are so much cheaper, and I'd ask about labour costs.

I had 115 square meters of house reroofed recently, cost me $12K including labour. That's for standard thickness standard color color steel.




AWS Certified Solution Architect Professional, Sysop Administrator Associate, and Developer Associate
TOGAF certified enterprise architect
Professional photographer


213 posts

Master Geek
+1 received by user: 30


  Reply # 1098098 29-Jul-2014 18:48
2 people support this post
Send private message

Hi iiylee,

I'm a roofer by trade and in my honest opinion you can't beat a long run colour steel roof. They really are vastly superior.

If you don't step on the very bottom in dead centre of the tiles they will dent/crease. back when we were doing tiles roughly 30% of all the jobs needed tiles to be replaced because plumbers or heatpump/ventilation guys putting penetrations in a roof and not knowing how to walk on tiles. A tile roof is very difficult to flash penetrations correctly and most of the time you are relying on silicone to keep the water out. Tile roof's still use nails to fix the tiles to the purlin which have a tendency to pop causing leaks.

Coro roofs are very forgiving when other trades are walking on them. They are easy to flash with 99% of the time the flashing is doing the waterproofing vs the silicone, and the sheets are screwed down with a washer sealing the screw to the sheet which is a lot more reliable than a nail.

In terms of cost tile and coro roofs are normally much of a muchness with coro generally being 5-10% cheaper. Tiles are more labour intensive with cheaper materials and coro is less labour intensive with more expensive materials.

Rick

14450 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 1899


  Reply # 1098105 29-Jul-2014 19:03
Send private message

RickW: Hi iiylee,

I'm a roofer by trade and in my honest opinion you can't beat a long run colour steel roof. They really are vastly superior.

If you don't step on the very bottom in dead centre of the tiles they will dent/crease. back when we were doing tiles roughly 30% of all the jobs needed tiles to be replaced because plumbers or heatpump/ventilation guys putting penetrations in a roof and not knowing how to walk on tiles. A tile roof is very difficult to flash penetrations correctly and most of the time you are relying on silicone to keep the water out. Tile roof's still use nails to fix the tiles to the purlin which have a tendency to pop causing leaks.

Coro roofs are very forgiving when other trades are walking on them. They are easy to flash with 99% of the time the flashing is doing the waterproofing vs the silicone, and the sheets are screwed down with a washer sealing the screw to the sheet which is a lot more reliable than a nail.

In terms of cost tile and coro roofs are normally much of a muchness with coro generally being 5-10% cheaper. Tiles are more labour intensive with cheaper materials and coro is less labour intensive with more expensive materials.

Rick


Are tiles a thinner gauge of steel? I am just wondering why tiles would be cheaper in terms of material. 

21620 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 4432

Trusted
Subscriber

  Reply # 1098113 29-Jul-2014 19:20
Send private message

Yeah they are thinner since they have a much smaller distance to span.




Richard rich.ms

gzt

10311 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 1584


  Reply # 1098128 29-Jul-2014 19:30
Send private message

If I'm reading the spec correctly the Gerrard tile system requires a ply underlay. That's interesting. I would expect that to have a mildly beneficial effect on insulation value. Maybe rain noise reduction as well from this system but just guessing there.

Edit: I may have been reading the wrong spec there.

gzt

10311 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 1584


  Reply # 1098132 29-Jul-2014 19:35
Send private message

richms: Yeah they are thinner since they have a much smaller distance to span.


This particular product is not as thin as I would have thought. I keep reading 0.39mm which is only slightly thinner than the 0.4mm coloursteel quoted earlier. Example:

http://www.ahiroofing.com/customscripts/download.aspx?file=../admin/BrochureImage/47114_Gerard_brochure.pdf

14450 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 1899


  Reply # 1098185 29-Jul-2014 20:55
Send private message

gzt: If I'm reading the spec correctly the Gerrard tile system requires a ply underlay. That's interesting. I would expect that to have a mildly beneficial effect on insulation value. Maybe rain noise reduction as well from this system but just guessing there.

Edit: I may have been reading the wrong spec there.


If something needs a ply underlay I would expect it to be substantially more expensive. Some of the euro tray systems need a ply underlay and you are paying a lot more for those a roofing systems.
I would doubt ply would help with insulation unless the roof is skillion.



10 posts

Wannabe Geek
+1 received by user: 1


  Reply # 1098241 29-Jul-2014 22:40
Send private message

Hi Rick,
If take account of the different frame/structure holding the roof, which one should be more expensive and how much the difference is for a 200 square meter house?
Thanks.

14450 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 1899


  Reply # 1098266 29-Jul-2014 23:11
Send private message

iiylee: Hi Rick,
If take account of the different frame/structure holding the roof, which one should be more expensive and how much the difference is for a 200 square meter house?
Thanks.


I would think pressed metal tiles only need narrower purlin spacing, so shouldn't affect roof structure and tiles vs longrun should weigh around the same.

213 posts

Master Geek
+1 received by user: 30


  Reply # 1098951 31-Jul-2014 06:43
Send private message

iiylee: Hi Rick,

If take account of the different frame/structure holding the roof, which one should be more expensive and how much the difference is for a 200 square meter house?

Thanks.


Hi iiylee,

The cost of purlins (coro) works out slightly cheaper for the actual timber structure. For the whole roof including labour and materials the difference would be around $1500 in favour of coro. But it's hard to give a exact figure without seeing the plans.

Rick

2020 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 1131


  Reply # 1098964 31-Jul-2014 08:22
Send private message

I'd say a large part of the price difference is down to the building company buying loads of them and therefore getting them at a very good price. 8k is a big difference though




Location: Dunedin

1 | 2 | 3
Filter this topic showing only the reply marked as answer View this topic in a long page with up to 500 replies per page Create new topic



Twitter »

Follow us to receive Twitter updates when new discussions are posted in our forums:



Follow us to receive Twitter updates when news items and blogs are posted in our frontpage:



Follow us to receive Twitter updates when tech item prices are listed in our price comparison site:



Geekzone Live »

Try automatic live updates from Geekzone directly in your browser, without refreshing the page, with Geekzone Live now.


Geekzone Live »

Our community of supporters help make Geekzone possible. Click the button below to join them.

Support Geezone on PressPatron



Are you subscribed to our RSS feed? You can download the latest headlines and summaries from our stories directly to your computer or smartphone by using a feed reader.

Alternatively, you can receive a daily email with Geekzone updates.