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  Reply # 1106898 12-Aug-2014 10:14
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I did try to find the source but I forget where I saw it. Quite possibly could be a rule of thumb comment.
I have brought some R1.5 foil lined duct insulation to wrap around the ducting, but the far room isn't being used currently so its low on the priority list.




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  Reply # 1107051 12-Aug-2014 13:55
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timmmay: ...

 

I'd like a good temperature monitoring solution for multiple zones too.


I'd like a good cheap one too.

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  Reply # 1109359 15-Aug-2014 23:32
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OP - have you actually tried a dehumidifier as suggested in your first thread? (Only just read both threads now). As a dehumidifier will remove dust from the air because as it condenses out moisture, dust particles will stick to the wet surfaces inside it. And will then drain into the water collection tank. The lower humidity levels will also help. And All waste energy from a dehumidifier is heat - So you are effectively using the same electricity twice.

In fact a dehumidifier actually gives you more heat than what it uses in power - How? Because of the latent heat of water. Every litre of water that your dehumidifier condenses out of the air = 0.6Kw of extra heat added to the room. This heat was originally used to evaporate 1 litre of liquid water into water vapour. By turning water vapour into into liquid water, you get this heat "back" again. Get a dehumidifier with a humidistat and only run the dehumidifier at night with the windows closed. During the day - windows open - dehumidifier off. No point in trying to dehumidify the whole world.

And since the main reason of getting a ventilation system is to reduce dust levels - make sure it has HEPA filters. As you need them to get rid of the super fine dust. A cloth type filter is only going to get rid of big dust particles. Make sure the Vacuum cleaner also has a HEPA filter. And does the house have downlights? If so get rid of them. As they are basicly just big holes in your ceiling. Also heatpumps only dehumidify when set to cooling mode. So a heatpump is not a replacement for a dehumidifier (at least in winter).

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  Reply # 1109367 15-Aug-2014 23:48
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Hammerer:
timmmay: ... I'd like a good temperature monitoring solution for multiple zones too.


I'd like a good cheap one too.


If you can setup a Arduino microcontroller it is easy to do. Buy lots of these https://nicegear.co.nz/sensors/one-wire-digital-temperature-sensor-ds18b20/ Same site also sells waterproof versions. Because they use digital communications between the sensors and the Arduino. You only need 1 I/O pin for lots of sensors. Have found that CAT6 cable works best for connecting the sensors to the Arduino. I have made a temp control system that uses 9 of these sensors which displays the temp of all sensors on a 16X2 character LCD screen and has 8 outputs that switch on and off based on what the temp readings are.

My system is used to control my hot water cylinder, radiator central heating, Solar hot water panels, and heating of my spa pool.

Same system can easily be used to control a ventilation system or anything where you need to measure temperature, And switch things on and off based on temp readings. If someone wants to build it. Im happy to provide my code and more advice on how to get it going. Assuming you already have some electronics knowledge of course.

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  Reply # 1109380 16-Aug-2014 07:21
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Aredwood: Every litre of water that your dehumidifier condenses out of the air = 0.6Kw of extra heat added to the room.

Please quantify this.  Is it 0.6kW for 24h, for 1h, for 1s?




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  Reply # 1109501 16-Aug-2014 14:21
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Niel:
Aredwood: Every litre of water that your dehumidifier condenses out of the air = 0.6Kw of extra heat added to the room.

Please quantify this.  Is it 0.6kW for 24h, for 1h, for 1s?


It is 0.6kW per litre of water that gets condensed out of the air. Since you want an answer of kW Vs time. You will need to measure how long it takes your dehumidifier to remove 1L of water from the air. (how long it takes 1L of water to build up in it's collection tank). The answer will then be 0.6kW per [time taken to produce 1L of liquid water].


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  Reply # 1109807 17-Aug-2014 10:02
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Aredwood:
Hammerer:
timmmay: ... I'd like a good temperature monitoring solution for multiple zones too.


I'd like a good cheap one too.


If you can setup a Arduino microcontroller it is easy to do. Buy lots of these https://nicegear.co.nz/sensors/one-wire-digital-temperature-sensor-ds18b20/ Same site also sells waterproof versions. Because they use digital communications between the sensors and the Arduino. You only need 1 I/O pin for lots of sensors. Have found that CAT6 cable works best for connecting the sensors to the Arduino. I have made a temp control system that uses 9 of these sensors which displays the temp of all sensors on a 16X2 character LCD screen and has 8 outputs that switch on and off based on what the temp readings are.

My system is used to control my hot water cylinder, radiator central heating, Solar hot water panels, and heating of my spa pool.

Same system can easily be used to control a ventilation system or anything where you need to measure temperature, And switch things on and off based on temp readings. If someone wants to build it. Im happy to provide my code and more advice on how to get it going. Assuming you already have some electronics knowledge of course.


Interesting option. Not sure I'd want or be able to run cat6 everywhere that I'd want a temperature sensor. Wireless would be awesome, but no doubt much more expensive.




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  Reply # 1110112 17-Aug-2014 20:54
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Thanks Aredwood

Great info re the HEPA filters.  We haven't put a dehumidifier in as we'd prefer a more permanent solution and have decided on a balanced pressure system.  Much appreciate your advice.

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