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Banana?
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  Reply # 1107467 13-Aug-2014 09:40
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We clean our stainless pans after every use.
Generally we won't use detergent though, just a good scrubbing is usually enough (especially if they have been soaked).
They don't go in the dishwasher.

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  Reply # 1107475 13-Aug-2014 09:51
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We can't use SS or copper on our Induction cook-top.

A Le Creuset skillet and two well cared for Stonedines all work a treat smile

 
 
 
 


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  Reply # 1107481 13-Aug-2014 10:00
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I was actually very tempted to give one of the pans being sold at the food show a go for the sake of it. Woll I think they were called. Research showed mixed results for them.

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  Reply # 1107736 13-Aug-2014 15:39
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timmmay: I'm still confused over cast iron vs steel pans. Why do people use cast iron when steel isn't affected by acids? Is it more non-stick? Does it do a better job?

Once I establish for myself a pan material is decent, probably be using a lower priced or smaller one for a year, I'll go by the best of whatever style is available. I've probably spent $700 on pans in the past 5 years (including the three circulon plus a couple of others), plus another $300 on the circulon pot set though I think I got it on special.


Carbon steel and cast iron are essentially the same and will be affected by acids.

I wouldn't buy stainless steel if it didn't have the benefits of acid & base resistance. It has significantly lower thermal conductivity than carbon steel (increasing the carbon content decreases thermal conductivity) and no more than half the conductivity of cast iron which is better.

Copper conductivity is a magnitude greater than all of them. That's why many stainless pans had copper bottoms to spread the heat more evenly.

Aluminium is the base in non-stick fry pans because it sits somewhere between cast iron (3x) and copper (x1/3). That's also why it is common in restaurants. Personally, I avoid aluminium because it scrapes off and deforms too easily - similar to my reasons for not using non-stick coatings..

I wouldn't buy a stainless frying pan for frying a steak.

[Edit typo]

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  Reply # 1107744 13-Aug-2014 15:41
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Hammerer:  timmmay: I'm still confused over cast iron vs steel pans. Why do people use cast iron when steel isn't affected by acids? Is it more non-stick? Does it do a better job?



I wouldn't buy a stainless frying pan for frying a steak.




Strange you say that, I wouldn't use anything else. I have tried everything else I can find (With the exception of copper), nothing does it better.

Having said that, I wouldn't cook eggs in a Stainless Steel Frying pan. I tend to use my non stick for this. Easier and quicker to clean and secondly eggs don't (usually) require high temperature to cook. 

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  Reply # 1107751 13-Aug-2014 15:58
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networkn:
Hammerer:  timmmay: I'm still confused over cast iron vs steel pans. Why do people use cast iron when steel isn't affected by acids? Is it more non-stick? Does it do a better job?



I wouldn't buy a stainless frying pan for frying a steak.




Strange you say that, I wouldn't use anything else. I have tried everything else I can find (With the exception of copper), nothing does it better.

Having said that, I wouldn't cook eggs in a Stainless Steel Frying pan. I tend to use my non stick for this. Easier and quicker to clean and secondly eggs don't (usually) require high temperature to cook. 

Stainless steel better than cast iron? I don't reckon. Each to their own though.

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  Reply # 1107957 13-Aug-2014 21:12
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best way to repair your cast iron skillet is to apply a touch of oil, wipe it off and place it upside down in your oven at the highest temperature for 10 minutes, then turn the oven off leaving the pan in.

you can only use non-stick coated frying pans at low to medium heat.



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  Reply # 1107959 13-Aug-2014 21:16
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So.. for cooking eggs and vegetables at high heat, steel or cast iron?




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  Reply # 1107999 13-Aug-2014 22:34
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timmmay: Thanks all. I guess I'll pick up a stainless steel pan some time. My wife will no doubt clean it after every use though.


you probably know, but there's something called baking soda.



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  Reply # 1108065 14-Aug-2014 07:21
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joker97:
timmmay: Thanks all. I guess I'll pick up a stainless steel pan some time. My wife will no doubt clean it after every use though.


you probably know, but there's something called baking soda.


I know there's something called baking soda, but I have no knowledge of it in this context. We clean dishes with washing up liquid.




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  Reply # 1108067 14-Aug-2014 07:26
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timmmay: So.. for cooking eggs and vegetables at high heat, steel or cast iron?


Your choice. The differences between them are not as clear-cut as with stainless steel. So it's likely to be decided by how you like to cook. For example, if young kids were helping you'd go for lighter pans which would mean using steel. Steel pans are normally lighter so they are is easier to handle, cast iron is normally more conductive but the thicker base holds heat longer so it's not usually more responsive.

Non-stick pans at a medium temperature are a good option for eggs because they are light and easy to clean. I think someone already pointed this out.

Eggs and vegetables usually get a short fast fry often followed by a low temperature simmer to prevent them breaking down. You know how the base of fried eggs is rather tough (though tasty), overcooking eggs denatures the proteins leaving you with broken-up / curdled / tough egg with all the water separated out. Overcooked vegetables wilt and the water separates out as well.



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  Reply # 1108070 14-Aug-2014 07:33
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I've never tried steel but we love our cast iron for high heat.

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  Reply # 1108074 14-Aug-2014 07:42
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Baking soda is a good cleaner. Non-toxic, mildly abrasive and alkaline (like dishwashing cleaners) to breakdown glutinous residues.

Re the eggs cooking, I thought I'd check what a food scientist says. Fry eggs at 124-138C where butter sizzles but doesn't brown says Harold McGee in his book "On Food and Cooking", 1986.



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  Reply # 1108076 14-Aug-2014 07:49
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I cook eggs how I like 'em - pan hot to the point of smoking, bit of oil, then scramble them with some cheese. So cast iron and stainless steel are similar for this role... ok I'll have a look when I next see a sale at Stevens or Briscoes :)




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  Reply # 1108077 14-Aug-2014 07:49
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I was interested to read that copper and aluminium should be avoided for cooking eggs because they react to increase odours and discolouration (green from copper, black from aluminium). The sulphur in the eggs becomes sulphide which is the source of that rotten egg smell found in geothermal areas like Rotorua.

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