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  Reply # 1218771 21-Jan-2015 07:33
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yes, nothing we can eat is good for health ... everything in moderation!



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  Reply # 1218772 21-Jan-2015 07:33
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ok maybe some foods :D

like greens and fish. apparently that will make one live longer ... still gotta die of something though

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  Reply # 1218900 21-Jan-2015 10:34
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Thanks so much for bringing this topic up – you’ve planted the idea in my head, and now even my wife’s keen!

Partly it’s because I’m sick of the smell left in the house when we even relatively shallow-fry stuff like papadoms, with a residual smell hanging around for a day or so. Plus there’s that definite health benefit of significantly reducing oil consumption- our kids love their chips so we could hopefully avoid having to buy F&Cs any more! (I hasten to add we don't have a deep fryer and very rarely fry stuff - primarily because of the levels of oil.)

My only problem is that I’d love to test it out before buying – it’s a significant investment to make without being sure it’s right. I wish shops had a ‘try before you buy’ option!

Looking at the various models, I’ve indeed read many worrying things about the Tefal model (a pity given it’s from the king of discounting, Briscoes), including parts melting!. I also am not keen on the stirrer in the Tefal damaging stuff that’s cooking. The cheaper Philips models (which seem to indeed get better reviews) are relatively small, though, with 800 g capacity – which means we’re looking at over $500 for their larger model ().

Does anyone have experience with other brands/models they could recommend? Or ideas of how to test them out before purchasing?

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  Reply # 1218903 21-Jan-2015 10:38
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jonathan18: Thanks so much for bringing this topic up – you’ve planted the idea in my head, and now even my wife’s keen!

Partly it’s because I’m sick of the smell left in the house when we even relatively shallow-fry stuff like papadoms, with a residual smell hanging around for a day or so. Plus there’s that definite health benefit of significantly reducing oil consumption- our kids love their chips so we could hopefully avoid having to buy F&Cs any more! (I hasten to add we don't have a deep fryer and very rarely fry stuff - primarily because of the levels of oil.)

My only problem is that I’d love to test it out before buying – it’s a significant investment to make without being sure it’s right. I wish shops had a ‘try before you buy’ option!

Looking at the various models, I’ve indeed read many worrying things about the Tefal model (a pity given it’s from the king of discounting, Briscoes), including parts melting!. I also am not keen on the stirrer in the Tefal damaging stuff that’s cooking. The cheaper Philips models (which seem to indeed get better reviews) are relatively small, though, with 800 g capacity – which means we’re looking at over $500 for their larger model ().

Does anyone have experience with other brands/models they could recommend? Or ideas of how to test them out before purchasing?


I am wondering who the distributor for them is ? The home show and food show often have demos though this won't help you today obviously.




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  Reply # 1218911 21-Jan-2015 10:55
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Hammerer:
joker97: ...
do you need to separate individual fries to get exposed to hot air or will it fry evenly all round


Where you have two fries stuck to each other they won't be crisp on the joined sides. That is the case in a deep frier too because air can penetrate pretty much anywhere the oil does.

If you don't let the frier heat up correctly or you overload the baskets then the food won't seal as well as it could because the temperature is drops too much. This allows more water to escape from the food which makes it drier on the inside and soggier on the outside. To fix that you have to cook it for longer to get it the surface to coagulate/become crispy but if it has lost too much water then food generally becomes tougher and less succulent.

As JWR points out, deep frying's big problem is how to preserve the oil for more than one use. It's big advantage is that the hot frier oil is a larger thermal mass which means that the temperature doesn't drop too much when you add the food. The benchtop air fryers don't have the same thermal mass so they cook smaller quantities.

If you are interested in the health benefits then less oil will be better but no heated oil might be better for our health.

I assume you like the taste of fried food so you should consider the type and quality of oil you use. This is important because oil breaks down into less healthy compounds in the presence of heat and oxygen. The type of fats in the oil have a big impact on the oil breakdown (becoming rancid) which occurs more quickly based on the number of double bonds in the fats: saturated fats don't have any so they breakdown slowest, monounsaturated fats have one so they are relatively resistant, but polyunsaturated have two or more so they breakdown a lot faster. On the other hand, there are the health issues associated with eating saturated fats. Cheap vegetable oils are often unsuitable for deep frying not just because they are polyunsaturated.

[Edit: Corrected grammar]


is canola oil good or bad?

for low heat cooking i use extra virgin OO (NZ ones, that's the freshest i've sampled from about 5 different brands inc the aussie ones)

but for high heat, all vege oil i can find has trans fats. *sigh. gotta die of something. even if it didn't have trans fats high heat creates something starting with A that is incredibly toxic. but i just close my brain and open my mouth

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  Reply # 1218930 21-Jan-2015 11:23
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Consumer has done a quick review of the smaller Philips unit; not the most positive but they're not always to be trusted...


Performance Philips Airfryer HD9220.
Philips Airfryer HD9220. We tested the Airfryer by cooking chips, chicken legs, crumbed chicken tenderloins and chicken balls. The chicken was juicy and tender with a nice golden colour. However, the chips weren’t evenly browned and were crisp in some areas but soft in others. Traditional deep-frying gives a quicker result – air-frying chips takes about the same time as oven-baking them. Most recipes required some oil but tiny amounts compared with a deep fryer.

Ease of use
The Airfryer is simple to use. The plastic exterior is easy to wipe over and the non-stick pan is a breeze to clean. The pan separator and stainless steel mesh basket are dishwasher-safe. But it’s bulky. It has a small cooking area equivalent to around four serves of one food item. Although it has a pan separator, allowing you cook several different items at once, chances are you’ll still need to cook in batches. This will add to the time taken to prepare the meal and you’ll still need the oven to keep the first batch warm.

Our verdict
While the Airfryer is a healthier alternative to deep frying, it’s expensive and despite its bulk it only fries comparatively small portions.

 

  • Philips Airfryer HD9220
  • Price: $400
  • Rating: 2 stars

(edit - formatting)



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  Reply # 1218935 21-Jan-2015 11:29
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i subscribed to consumer for one year then stopped. because i can never trust their reviews. very poorly designed "tests" ! some random very simple testing designed and then a star is given.

JWR

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  Reply # 1219175 21-Jan-2015 14:50

joker97:
Hammerer:
joker97: ...
do you need to separate individual fries to get exposed to hot air or will it fry evenly all round


Where you have two fries stuck to each other they won't be crisp on the joined sides. That is the case in a deep frier too because air can penetrate pretty much anywhere the oil does.

If you don't let the frier heat up correctly or you overload the baskets then the food won't seal as well as it could because the temperature is drops too much. This allows more water to escape from the food which makes it drier on the inside and soggier on the outside. To fix that you have to cook it for longer to get it the surface to coagulate/become crispy but if it has lost too much water then food generally becomes tougher and less succulent.

As JWR points out, deep frying's big problem is how to preserve the oil for more than one use. It's big advantage is that the hot frier oil is a larger thermal mass which means that the temperature doesn't drop too much when you add the food. The benchtop air fryers don't have the same thermal mass so they cook smaller quantities.

If you are interested in the health benefits then less oil will be better but no heated oil might be better for our health.

I assume you like the taste of fried food so you should consider the type and quality of oil you use. This is important because oil breaks down into less healthy compounds in the presence of heat and oxygen. The type of fats in the oil have a big impact on the oil breakdown (becoming rancid) which occurs more quickly based on the number of double bonds in the fats: saturated fats don't have any so they breakdown slowest, monounsaturated fats have one so they are relatively resistant, but polyunsaturated have two or more so they breakdown a lot faster. On the other hand, there are the health issues associated with eating saturated fats. Cheap vegetable oils are often unsuitable for deep frying not just because they are polyunsaturated.

[Edit: Corrected grammar]


is canola oil good or bad?

for low heat cooking i use extra virgin OO (NZ ones, that's the freshest i've sampled from about 5 different brands inc the aussie ones)

but for high heat, all vege oil i can find has trans fats. *sigh. gotta die of something. even if it didn't have trans fats high heat creates something starting with A that is incredibly toxic. but i just close my brain and open my mouth


I mostly use rice ran oil.

It gives nicely browned result and doesn't have that oily smell about it.

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  Reply # 1219180 21-Jan-2015 14:55
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I have thought about one of these for a while, can never make my mind up.




Mike
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  Reply # 1219622 22-Jan-2015 00:45
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JWR:
joker97:

is canola oil good or bad?

for low heat cooking i use extra virgin OO (NZ ones, that's the freshest i've sampled from about 5 different brands inc the aussie ones)

but for high heat, all vege oil i can find has trans fats. *sigh. gotta die of something. even if it didn't have trans fats high heat creates something starting with A that is incredibly toxic. but i just close my brain and open my mouth


I mostly use rice ran oil.

It gives nicely browned result and doesn't have that oily smell about it.


We also use rice bran oil as it has a high smoke point (~250C) and it is virtually flavourless. We buy it at wholesalers (Davis Trading, Moore Wilson) in 10-20 litre packs.

PS Wikipedia has a good list of Smoke points for fats

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  Reply # 1219656 22-Jan-2015 06:32
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Hammerer:
JWR:
joker97:

is canola oil good or bad?

for low heat cooking i use extra virgin OO (NZ ones, that's the freshest i've sampled from about 5 different brands inc the aussie ones)

but for high heat, all vege oil i can find has trans fats. *sigh. gotta die of something. even if it didn't have trans fats high heat creates something starting with A that is incredibly toxic. but i just close my brain and open my mouth


I mostly use rice ran oil.

It gives nicely browned result and doesn't have that oily smell about it.


We also use rice bran oil as it has a high smoke point (~250C) and it is virtually flavourless. We buy it at wholesalers (Davis Trading, Moore Wilson) in 10-20 litre packs.

PS Wikipedia has a good list of Smoke points for fats


Hmm looks like I might be changing my type of oil used from currently Canola oil to rice bran oil even though Canola was purported to be the best non trans fat produced oil 



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  Reply # 1219706 22-Jan-2015 08:10
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rice brain oil has high omega 6: omega 3 ratio.

that ratio if i'm not mistaken is linked to terrible things.

whatever oil you use you're going to die of something. unless you eat only organic veges and fish

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  Reply # 1219789 22-Jan-2015 09:15
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joker97:  whatever oil you use you're going to die of something. unless you eat only organic veges and fish


And then you live forever, barring accidents? Ahh, the secret to ever-lasting life...

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  Reply # 1219901 22-Jan-2015 11:21
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Hi


 

Was given a Philips Air Fryer as gift.
LOVE IT.

Safe and easy to use to kids, no smell in the house
Have cooked fresh crumbed fish...yummo
Best Chips are the crinkle cut HomeBrand from Countdown (200deg 20 min shake once during cooking)
Cooked fresh sausages chicken nuggets etc all good
also tried steak and it came out med rare and tasted yummo.

Very easy to clean (put tin foil in bottom) clean up is a breeze.

Easy to use and read set temp beeps when at temp add food set timer and your away laughing

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  Reply # 1219946 22-Jan-2015 11:54
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livealittle: Hi

 Was given a Philips Air Fryer as gift.
LOVE IT.


Great to hear some real-life experience with a Philips airfryer - thanks for the tips as well. Which model do you have, and how do you find its capacity? My concern is the 800g models (smaller ones) just won't feed our family of four (with two boys that aren't going to get any smaller!).

Farmers has one of the smaller models (HD9220) reduced from $400 to $280 (http://www.farmers.co.nz/philips-air-fryer-hd9220-5856013)

The 1.2kg model (HD9240) is a terribly high $599 at Noel Leemings but at least drops to $438 with my work discount https://www.noelleeming.co.nz/shop/kitchen-laundry-appliances/small-appliances/cooking-appliances/fryers/philips-hd9240-90-airfryer-xl-black/prod132022.html

Briscoes has the Tefal one 35% off today, though I'm not touching that based on reviews http://www.briscoes.co.nz/shop-by-brand/tefal/tefal-actifry-health-cooker-1054660

At this stage we're planning on getting the HD9240, but wonder if it's worth waiting around for a better price than $438 (a discount of 27% isn't too bad I guess)...

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