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  Reply # 1246482 25-Feb-2015 15:37
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JonnyCam:
trig42: Oh, and personal peeve, don't put the decking timber ridged side up. Just makes it dangerous and slippy, and is uncomfortable.

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In australia the 'grip tread' is sold as a feature to draw the moisute away from the top of the deck by having it face downwards.



this...

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  Reply # 1246730 25-Feb-2015 22:25
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I just finished reading shed magazine Dec 2014 Jan 2015 and there was a part about building consents and exemptions.

There is a lot of exemptions, but most have size/height restrictions. I would ask the local Council to be clear.

Interesting is it says a building less than 10 Sq meters is exempt as long as it's further away from any boundary or existing building by at least the same distance as it is high. There are other restrictions on it (like must meet building code etc) so could build a gaming room!

 
 
 
 


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  Reply # 1246737 25-Feb-2015 22:36
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KennyM: I just finished reading shed magazine Dec 2014 Jan 2015 and there was a part about building consents and exemptions.

There is a lot of exemptions, but most have size/height restrictions. I would ask the local Council to be clear.

Interesting is it says a building less than 10 Sq meters is exempt as long as it's further away from any boundary or existing building by at least the same distance as it is high. There are other restrictions on it (like must meet building code etc) so could build a gaming room!


The guide timbosan has linked to above has details of all the building consent exemptions and guidance on each. Would be a good place to start.

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  Reply # 1246763 26-Feb-2015 00:54
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Has to be a black deck






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  Reply # 1246764 26-Feb-2015 01:16
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Jaxson:
JonnyCam:
trig42: Oh, and personal peeve, don't put the decking timber ridged side up. Just makes it dangerous and slippy, and is uncomfortable.

+1
In australia the 'grip tread' is sold as a feature to draw the moisute away from the top of the deck by having it face downwards.



this...


I have just put a new deck down to replace an old one, and the tread was installed downwards. The old decking which was 20 years old didn't have a tread, however I have seen many decks which have the tread upwards, and they are very slippery, because there is less surface area when you are walking on it. Calling it grip tread is part of the problem, as that isn't what it is.

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  Reply # 1246765 26-Feb-2015 01:22
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timbosan:
trig42: In Auckland, decks don't need building permits if they are less then 1.5m, not 1m to the ground.



This is also in the DBH document, it is 1.5m, not 1m as most people are stating.


Which document are you referring to about the 1.5 metre height? This one http://www.dbh.govt.nz/codewords-32-12  ?  If it is 1.5 metre  high it should need a balustrade, which the council would have to look at too, so it complies with the building code, and is built correctly and children can't climb up it or get their head stuck in it etc. T Disclaimer: People though should always consult with a professional.

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  Reply # 1246779 26-Feb-2015 07:34
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Whether it below 1.5 metres or not it still has to comply with the building code 

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  Reply # 1246784 26-Feb-2015 07:55
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mattwnz:
timbosan:
trig42: In Auckland, decks don't need building permits if they are less then 1.5m, not 1m to the ground.



This is also in the DBH document, it is 1.5m, not 1m as most people are stating.


Which document are you referring to about the 1.5 metre height? This one http://www.dbh.govt.nz/codewords-32-12  ?  If it is 1.5 metre  high it should need a balustrade, which the council would have to look at too, so it complies with the building code, and is built correctly and children can't climb up it or get their head stuck in it etc. T Disclaimer: People though should always consult with a professional.


Nope. In Auckland you can build up to 1.5m high. You will still need handrails, balustrades and are meant to build in line with code however under 1.5m there is no requirement for consent or inspections.

http://www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/EN/ratesbuildingproperty/consents/buildingstructures/Pages/fencesdecksretainingwalls.aspx#decks


Edit: make url a hyperlink.



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  Reply # 1246786 26-Feb-2015 08:00
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Hey guys.thanks so much for the info its been really helpfull. Will post pictures when I am done...if I remember too.

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  Reply # 1246801 26-Feb-2015 08:45
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mattwnz:
Jaxson:
JonnyCam:
trig42: Oh, and personal peeve, don't put the decking timber ridged side up. Just makes it dangerous and slippy, and is uncomfortable.

+1
In australia the 'grip tread' is sold as a feature to draw the moisute away from the top of the deck by having it face downwards.



this...


I have just put a new deck down to replace an old one, and the tread was installed downwards. The old decking which was 20 years old didn't have a tread, however I have seen many decks which have the tread upwards, and they are very slippery, because there is less surface area when you are walking on it. Calling it grip tread is part of the problem, as that isn't what it is.


Thats weird, I have a 23 year old Kwila deck, tread up,  that runs around the entire house, in all that time no one has ever slipped on it, and that includes some pretty hefty booze fueled BBQs over the years. I water blast and oil it every few years and its still nearly as good as new. Maybe its the type of timber people are using, or possibly lack of maintenance (mould/moss etc) causing slip issues?



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  Reply # 1246834 26-Feb-2015 09:32
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I would assume too much or too little of the wrong coating could cause slippage. Too much leka if you have would make it more rubbery causing it to be a lot more smooth. Too little would cause the expose wood to be slightly softer making it a little gummy like and would also cause a slippage. So the right wood and coating would be important. So you dont want too much coating and the least amount of water absorbed. Proper and timely maintenance would prevent that

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  Reply # 1246910 26-Feb-2015 10:32
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Interestingly, the 1m fall applies at 1200mm from the edge. So if you have a slope away from the deck edge then you have to measure 1200mm out to get the 1m drop rule to apply. Not that too many council inspectors seem to worry about that.

Have a look at this codewords article for diagrams: http://www.dbh.govt.nz/codewords-32-12

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  Reply # 1246978 26-Feb-2015 11:59
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Slightly related..
what if I was to repair a partly rotted old deck, its more than 2m high?
Would building consents be required.

And whats average the costs involved of getting consents for decks 2m high ?

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  Reply # 1246979 26-Feb-2015 12:00
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kiwitrc:
mattwnz:
Jaxson:
JonnyCam:
trig42: Oh, and personal peeve, don't put the decking timber ridged side up. Just makes it dangerous and slippy, and is uncomfortable.

+1
In australia the 'grip tread' is sold as a feature to draw the moisute away from the top of the deck by having it face downwards.



this...


I have just put a new deck down to replace an old one, and the tread was installed downwards. The old decking which was 20 years old didn't have a tread, however I have seen many decks which have the tread upwards, and they are very slippery, because there is less surface area when you are walking on it. Calling it grip tread is part of the problem, as that isn't what it is.


Thats weird, I have a 23 year old Kwila deck, tread up,  that runs around the entire house, in all that time no one has ever slipped on it, and that includes some pretty hefty booze fueled BBQs over the years. I water blast and oil it every few years and its still nearly as good as new. Maybe its the type of timber people are using, or possibly lack of maintenance (mould/moss etc) causing slip issues?



Depends on the environment. Frosty mornings where I live rain can lead to the 'channels' being filled with ice.



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  Reply # 1247171 26-Feb-2015 15:50
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Its best to put the grooves down anyway, it helps prevent rot at the very  top of the deck joists

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