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Hmm, what to write...
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  # 1362330 10-Aug-2015 18:52
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Jaxson:
gregmcc:

BTW if you think your insurance company is your friend, your wrong, they will try every possible excuse to get out of paying.


Well that went off in a tangent quickly.

I don't think they are my friend, but thanks for advising me all the same.

Just saying what he's legally entitled to do, as others have posted links to, IF he owns the house and IF he lives in it.

As for what potential issues there are down the line, that's not covered in the links/regulations, but agree it's probably not worth the hassle. 


If he carries out the work within the law and he stuffs it up and burns the house down...his insurance covers it. Its just like failing to give way in your car... Insurance still covers it if it is your fault. 




Matthew


Stu

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  # 1362426 10-Aug-2015 21:24
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Exactly, the insurance company cannot get out of their obligations if you've done work you're legally entitled to do.




Keep calm, and carry on posting.

 

 

 

Click to see full size Click to see full size


 
 
 
 


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  # 1362504 10-Aug-2015 23:01
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mdooher:

This is a "must not", yes it is a legal requirement. The reasoning is: if two wires are in the same constricted hole and you drive a nail through that hole (hanging a picture, attaching Gib etc) you could end up with 230V on a circuit that is designed for 12V etc.


informative, thanks

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  # 1362529 11-Aug-2015 06:08
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Stu: Exactly, the insurance company cannot get out of their obligations if you've done work you're legally entitled to do.


but how do you prove you know how do do electrical work correctly...... average joe bloggs doesn't have any documented training to prove it, the insurance company will  want some kind of proof of that otherwise they would raise the issue of, was it done according to the standards and industry practice, been a home owner do the DIYer actually know what the NZ/AUS says regarding this, and what industry practice is.....no......another big out for the insurance company

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  # 1362569 11-Aug-2015 08:44
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greg, you're reaching bud

Hmm, what to write...
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  # 1362609 11-Aug-2015 09:25
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gregmcc:
Stu: Exactly, the insurance company cannot get out of their obligations if you've done work you're legally entitled to do.


but how do you prove you know how do do electrical work correctly...... average joe bloggs doesn't have any documented training to prove it, the insurance company will  want some kind of proof of that otherwise they would raise the issue of, was it done according to the standards and industry practice, been a home owner do the DIYer actually know what the NZ/AUS says regarding this, and what industry practice is.....no......another big out for the insurance company


Average Joe doesn't need documentation to prove he his competent. He is permitted to do the work, end of story. He must take care, but if he makes a genuine mistake he is covered by insurance. The insurance company  would need to PROVE negligence.

Another example, You change the wheel on your boat trailer because you have a puncture. Because its cold, kids screaming at you etc you forget to torque the lug nuts/wheel bolts when you lower the trailer.... later the wheel goes flying past your car and the trailer flips causing all sorts of damage. Will you need to prove your competence as a mechanic for the insurance to pay out?

Sounds like someone has been listening to ECANZ scare tactics to me.




Matthew


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  # 1362646 11-Aug-2015 10:22
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mdooher:
gregmcc:
Stu: Exactly, the insurance company cannot get out of their obligations if you've done work you're legally entitled to do.


but how do you prove you know how do do electrical work correctly...... average joe bloggs doesn't have any documented training to prove it, the insurance company will  want some kind of proof of that otherwise they would raise the issue of, was it done according to the standards and industry practice, been a home owner do the DIYer actually know what the NZ/AUS says regarding this, and what industry practice is.....no......another big out for the insurance company


Average Joe doesn't need documentation to prove he his competent. He is permitted to do the work, end of story. He must take care, but if he makes a genuine mistake he is covered by insurance. The insurance company  would need to PROVE negligence.

Another example, You change the wheel on your boat trailer because you have a puncture. Because its cold, kids screaming at you etc you forget to torque the lug nuts/wheel bolts when you lower the trailer.... later the wheel goes flying past your car and the trailer flips causing all sorts of damage. Will you need to prove your competence as a mechanic for the insurance to pay out?

Sounds like someone has been listening to ECANZ scare tactics to me.


Exactly - how do I prove I can operate my cooker correctly without starting a fire?  Or run a bath without leaving the taps on and flooding the bathroom?  Is there some training and certification I can do to assess the flow rate out of a tap and the remaining volume in a bathtub?

I would actually quite enjoy the process of an insurance company trying to prove that I was not capable of loosening two screws, removing two wires from a light fitting and then reversing the process on a new fitting.

 
 
 
 


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  # 1362652 11-Aug-2015 10:33
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That said the new fitting does need to be suitable for use in NZ.

As gregmcc has mentioned earlier, you should definitely ensure you walk out of the store with a copy or link to the suppliers document of conformity for the product you are buying.

eg link one

eg link two

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  # 1362658 11-Aug-2015 10:41
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mdooher:
gregmcc:
Stu: Exactly, the insurance company cannot get out of their obligations if you've done work you're legally entitled to do.


but how do you prove you know how do do electrical work correctly...... average joe bloggs doesn't have any documented training to prove it, the insurance company will  want some kind of proof of that otherwise they would raise the issue of, was it done according to the standards and industry practice, been a home owner do the DIYer actually know what the NZ/AUS says regarding this, and what industry practice is.....no......another big out for the insurance company


Average Joe doesn't need documentation to prove he his competent. He is permitted to do the work, end of story. He must take care, but if he makes a genuine mistake he is covered by insurance. The insurance company  would need to PROVE negligence.

Another example, You change the wheel on your boat trailer because you have a puncture. Because its cold, kids screaming at you etc you forget to torque the lug nuts/wheel bolts when you lower the trailer.... later the wheel goes flying past your car and the trailer flips causing all sorts of damage. Will you need to prove your competence as a mechanic for the insurance to pay out?

Sounds like someone has been listening to ECANZ scare tactics to me.


That's my belief as well. 
One of the most common causes of house fires is the moronic "midnight fry up", passing out drunk on the sofa, hopefully (but unfortunately not always) waking up when the smoke alarms go off to let you know that the kitchen's ablaze.  If that didn't get you, then nodding off in bed while having that post-supper smoke might.

I read a NZ government report somewhere on the internet about electrical failure initiated house fires and electrocutions, think it was prepared as part of a study into the danger of old wiring, for which the incidence of fire or electrocution was surprisingly low compared to other factors - faulty plug-in appliances, using heaters etc too close to combustible materials/clothing, as well as abject stupidity (knife in the toaster, extension cord to run fan heater next to the bathtub etc).

Hmm, what to write...
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  # 1362660 11-Aug-2015 10:44
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Jaxson: That said the new fitting does need to be suitable for use in NZ.

As gregmcc has mentioned earlier, you should definitely ensure you walk out of the store with a copy or link to the suppliers document of conformity for the product you are buying.

eg link one

eg link two


Rules have changed, only the seller needs it. If the homeowner buys it in New Zealand he can assume the document exists. If it does not exist and the fitting is substandard and burns the house down the insurance company and Energy Safety can go after the seller.




Matthew


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  # 1363089 11-Aug-2015 18:49
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I'm in the process of making some wooden lamp shades that will go on standard bought in NZ lamps. Do my lamp shades need an SDOC?

Or it may be more accurate to say I'm making some hanging wooden lights where all the electrical components are bought in NZ.




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  # 1363107 11-Aug-2015 19:06
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mcraenz: I'm in the process of making some wooden lamp shades that will go on standard bought in NZ lamps. Do my lamp shades need an SDOC?

Or it may be more accurate to say I'm making some hanging wooden lights where all the electrical components are bought in NZ.


for your own personal use NO, now if you are making them and selling them then YES

Using wood as a lamp shade.....hmmm.... may want to think about that

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  # 1363112 11-Aug-2015 19:15
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I'm using wood so that when it catches fire and burns the house down there will be nothing but ash and sdoc approved fittings left behind. Insurance man will have to find anther way to screw me.

No but seriously wood is used a lot in lighting. E.g:

http://www.davidtrubridge.com/designs/lighting/

As long as you consider good air flow etc then it's fine.







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  # 1363143 11-Aug-2015 19:57
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mcraenz: I'm using wood so that when it catches fire and burns the house down there will be nothing but ash and sdoc approved fittings left behind. Insurance man will have to find anther way to screw me.

No but seriously wood is used a lot in lighting. E.g:

http://www.davidtrubridge.com/designs/lighting/

As long as you consider good air flow etc then it's fine.





Using LED bulbs would be a good idea. They eat much less power and produce much less heat. But please don't bother with cheap brands.

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  # 1363150 11-Aug-2015 20:04
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Yes planning to use led. COB Filament type like this:

http://www.lightoes.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/08/Combination-Vintage-Modern-Classic-Contemporary-Antique-Filament-LED-Bulbs-Design-Ideas-Unique-Style-incandescent-Bulb-Edison-Hand-strung-Tungsten-Filaments-Dimmable-Accent-and-Decorative-Uses.jpg




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