Geekzone: technology news, blogs, forums
Guest
Welcome Guest.
You haven't logged in yet. If you don't have an account you can register now.


Filter this topic showing only the reply marked as answer View this topic in a long page with up to 500 replies per page Create new topic
1 | 2 | 3 | 4
198 posts

Master Geek

Lifetime subscriber

  # 1369144 19-Aug-2015 10:26
Send private message

timmmay: .... Also potentially interested in DIY options, within reason - if it involves any soldering I'm probably not interested.


I have used most of the Global Cache Itach/GC-100 range for much of my home automation and all of my IR needs for many years.

They are capable of learning and transmitting very long IR codes and I control all of my 2006 model Mitsubishi air-con units with no issues.

However, this is a geeky (non-soldering) solution because the Global Cache hardware is TCP/IP based and you need to control their units with software capable of opening a port and sending the required commands (which are quite simple once you read the API).

If you have some basic knowledge of working with TCP/IP ports you would find them quite useful for controlling anything IR based.

My entire IR control system is based on a local ubuntu/apache web server and PHP scripting to produce a fully featured remote control web page with a mass of html buttons for most AV and home automation. This makes the remote control available to all family members on any web based device that they want to use.

Cost-wise: A single iTach IP2IR or WiFi2IR unit is around US $100-$140 from overseas sites and although they only have 3 IR output ports, I have found that you can actually use stereo jack splitter's to route IR emitters to other devices in other rooms without any major issues.

For example, a single IP2IR Itach is feeding IR to several devices in the Lounge, a few in the Theater room and it also controls the upstairs bedroom air-con via one of the spare RG6 cables where a stick-on IR sender is attached to the bedroom air-con.

The iTach comes with stick-on emitters and a single IR blaster and additional emitters are relatively cheap. The stick-on cables are great for routing to other rooms because you can cut one in half and wire it into the house cabling to run IR control to other devices. I am currently sending IR signals through all types of cables (Cat5e, RG6 and normal AV cables). The emitters only have 2 wires so connecting back to the Itach is easy and there appears to be no major signal loss during long runs (up to about 20-25 meters in my case).

If you have a passion to play around with scripting or programming, you can write simple scripts to automate any IR device. I currently have several working automated functions to turn on or off devices at particular times using these units.



15110 posts

Uber Geek

Trusted
Subscriber

  # 1369162 19-Aug-2015 10:45
Send private message

Interesting option. I'd probably have to run wires everywhere or drill holes in the ceiling for that, which the Mrs probably wouldn't like. So I'd need two units, and a bunch of time to get it all working. That's not a lot cheaper than the off the shelf option for my case. Thanks though, interesting option.

 
 
 
 


271 posts

Ultimate Geek

Lifetime subscriber

  # 1369164 19-Aug-2015 10:46
Send private message

sbiddle: I'm keen to build my own Arduino solution as a project when I get some time.


I watch with interest, found this site with interesting units and kits.   

https://www.cooking-hacks.com/documentation/tutorials/control-hvac-infrared-devices-from-the-internet-with-ir-remote/




:)




15110 posts

Uber Geek

Trusted
Subscriber

  # 1369166 19-Aug-2015 10:51
Send private message

Interesting, but it's still quite expensive when you count the R.Pi and the extra hardware you need. NZ$120 for the R.Pi version, plus the Pi.

8816 posts

Uber Geek

Lifetime subscriber

  # 1369196 19-Aug-2015 11:28
Send private message

timmmay: Interesting, but it's still quite expensive when you count the R.Pi and the extra hardware you need. NZ$120 for the R.Pi version, plus the Pi.


An arduino clone can be had from about $25 from some NZ suppliers

1686 posts

Uber Geek

Subscriber

  # 1370184 19-Aug-2015 11:36
Send private message

datahawk:
timmmay: .... Also potentially interested in DIY options, within reason - if it involves any soldering I'm probably not interested.


I have used most of the Global Cache Itach/GC-100 range for much of my home automation and all of my IR needs for many years.

They are capable of learning and transmitting very long IR codes and I control all of my 2006 model Mitsubishi air-con units with no issues.

However, this is a geeky (non-soldering) solution because the Global Cache hardware is TCP/IP based and you need to control their units with software capable of opening a port and sending the required commands (which are quite simple once you read the API).

If you have some basic knowledge of working with TCP/IP ports you would find them quite useful for controlling anything IR based.

My entire IR control system is based on a local ubuntu/apache web server and PHP scripting to produce a fully featured remote control web page with a mass of html buttons for most AV and home automation. This makes the remote control available to all family members on any web based device that they want to use.

Cost-wise: A single iTach IP2IR or WiFi2IR unit is around US $100-$140 from overseas sites and although they only have 3 IR output ports, I have found that you can actually use stereo jack splitter's to route IR emitters to other devices in other rooms without any major issues.

For example, a single IP2IR Itach is feeding IR to several devices in the Lounge, a few in the Theater room and it also controls the upstairs bedroom air-con via one of the spare RG6 cables where a stick-on IR sender is attached to the bedroom air-con.

The iTach comes with stick-on emitters and a single IR blaster and additional emitters are relatively cheap. The stick-on cables are great for routing to other rooms because you can cut one in half and wire it into the house cabling to run IR control to other devices. I am currently sending IR signals through all types of cables (Cat5e, RG6 and normal AV cables). The emitters only have 2 wires so connecting back to the Itach is easy and there appears to be no major signal loss during long runs (up to about 20-25 meters in my case).

If you have a passion to play around with scripting or programming, you can write simple scripts to automate any IR device. I currently have several working automated functions to turn on or off devices at particular times using these units.


FYI - openHAB has a binding for the Global Cache IR system.

https://github.com/openhab/openhab/wiki/Global-Cache-IR-Binding

Potentially a bit simpler as it probably doesn't require as much scripting, and you get a UI with native iOS/Android apps thrown in. 



15110 posts

Uber Geek

Trusted
Subscriber

  # 1370225 19-Aug-2015 12:42
Send private message

Is there any way openhab could help do this cheaply?

 
 
 
 


1686 posts

Uber Geek

Subscriber

  # 1370245 19-Aug-2015 13:28
One person supports this post
Send private message

openHAB is just software so you will still need some hardware to *speak* to your device. If your A/C is in the living room something like the Global Cache device might be a worthwhile investment since you can then setup openHAB to control all of your AV gear as well as the A/C (and anything else nearby that is IR).

You will still need something to run openHAB on tho - a Rapsberry Pi 2 is probably the most cost effective option.

So the cost for *just controlling the A/C* is probably higher than you were hoping for, however if you plan it right you could end up with a load more devices that are controllable, for the same outlay.

Plus, if you have anything IP controllable (e.g. Yamaha AVR, smart TV, Squeezebox, Sonos, XBMC) you can hook these into openHAB for free since they all have bindings readily available.

149 posts

Master Geek


  # 1370313 19-Aug-2015 15:00
Send private message

timmmay: Is there any way openhab could help do this cheaply?


I'm looking forward to this being finished http://forum.mysensors.org/topic/1402/ir-blaster-progress which I hope will control both our heatpumps.

Also can build one using http://www.mysensors.org/build/ir Due to having a Toshiba heatpump have extremely long IR code won't fit on Arduino nano (that I could work out with limited knowledge) which means I'd need a Arduino Mega to store code, I have now brought one but not tried setting up yet.

MySenors works with openHab

48 posts

Geek


  # 1370329 19-Aug-2015 15:23
Send private message

What about a Broadlink RM Home? (~USD$30).  Might need two depending on if you have line of sight to both heatpumps. Have used one before and it done the job ok.
Similar devices like the "geeklink" can be setup with a hub and an extender - but I've never tried one of these. 



15110 posts

Uber Geek

Trusted
Subscriber

  # 1370349 19-Aug-2015 16:11
Send private message

That Broadlink thing looks interesting, and a couple of youtube reviews say it seems to work. For $33 it seems like a pretty good option if you want direct control from your phone. You'd have to add some kind of other app or controller to get a timer though.

I like the geeklink website - it has infrared lambs!

What does this tag do
1022 posts

Uber Geek

Subscriber

  # 1370403 19-Aug-2015 17:29
Send private message

Love my Tado https://www.tado.com/ but guess you would need two and would be out of budget unless can use an IR repeater

48 posts

Geek


  # 1370407 19-Aug-2015 17:39
Send private message

timmmay: That Broadlink thing looks interesting, and a couple of youtube reviews say it seems to work. For $33 it seems like a pretty good option if you want direct control from your phone. You'd have to add some kind of other app or controller to get a timer though.


The Broadlink has built in timer/scheduling. 



15110 posts

Uber Geek

Trusted
Subscriber

  # 1370428 19-Aug-2015 18:15
Send private message

Adamww:
timmmay: That Broadlink thing looks interesting, and a couple of youtube reviews say it seems to work. For $33 it seems like a pretty good option if you want direct control from your phone. You'd have to add some kind of other app or controller to get a timer though.


The Broadlink has built in timer/scheduling. 


Great! Do you happen to know if your phone as to be on and internet connected for that to work, or if the device does it? Just because I want to turn heating on before I get home.

Seems like amazing device for the money!

48 posts

Geek


  # 1370554 19-Aug-2015 21:16
Send private message

timmmay:
Adamww:
timmmay: That Broadlink thing looks interesting, and a couple of youtube reviews say it seems to work. For $33 it seems like a pretty good option if you want direct control from your phone. You'd have to add some kind of other app or controller to get a timer though.


The Broadlink has built in timer/scheduling. 


Great! Do you happen to know if your phone as to be on and internet connected for that to work, or if the device does it? Just because I want to turn heating on before I get home.


No, the schedule and commands are stored in the cloud, so only the broadllink needs to be connected to the net all the time but not your phone.  Check out the video at the bottom of this page; http://broadlink.co.nz/content/7-tips-and-tricks it shows how to set up a heatpump and schedule.

1 | 2 | 3 | 4
Filter this topic showing only the reply marked as answer View this topic in a long page with up to 500 replies per page Create new topic



Twitter and LinkedIn »



Follow us to receive Twitter updates when new discussions are posted in our forums:



Follow us to receive Twitter updates when news items and blogs are posted in our frontpage:



Follow us to receive Twitter updates when tech item prices are listed in our price comparison site:





News »

Facebook Portal to land in New Zealand
Posted 19-Sep-2019 18:35


Amazon Studios announces New Zealand as location for its upcoming series based on The Lord of the Rings
Posted 18-Sep-2019 17:24


The Warehouse chooses Elasticsearch service
Posted 18-Sep-2019 13:55


Voyager upgrades core network to 100Gbit
Posted 18-Sep-2019 13:52


Streaming service Acorn TV launches in New Zealand with selection with British shows
Posted 18-Sep-2019 08:55


Bitcoin.com announces partnership with smartphone manufacturer HTC
Posted 16-Sep-2019 21:30


Finalists Announced for Microsoft NZ Partner Awards
Posted 16-Sep-2019 19:37


OPPO Showcases New CameraX Capabilities at Google Developer Days China 2019
Posted 15-Sep-2019 12:42


New Zealand PC Market returns to growth
Posted 15-Sep-2019 12:24


Home sensor charity director speaks about the preventable death which drives her to push for healthy homes
Posted 11-Sep-2019 08:46


Te ao Maori Minecraft world set to inspire Kiwi students
Posted 11-Sep-2019 08:43


Research reveals The Power of Games in New Zealand
Posted 11-Sep-2019 08:40


Ring Door View Cam now available in New Zealand
Posted 11-Sep-2019 08:38


Vodafone NZ to create X Squad
Posted 10-Sep-2019 10:25


Huawei nova 5T to be available 20th September
Posted 5-Sep-2019 11:55



Geekzone Live »

Try automatic live updates from Geekzone directly in your browser, without refreshing the page, with Geekzone Live now.


Support Geekzone »

Our community of supporters help make Geekzone possible. Click the button below to join them.

Support Geezone on PressPatron



Are you subscribed to our RSS feed? You can download the latest headlines and summaries from our stories directly to your computer or smartphone by using a feed reader.

Alternatively, you can receive a daily email with Geekzone updates.