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8596 posts

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  # 1381039 7-Sep-2015 11:54
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BlueShift: 

There's two types of 30 Seconds cleaner - one is sodium hypchlorite based and the other is benzylkonium chloride which is an algicide. If you read the side of the container, it will tell you the concentration of bleach they use, its probably on their website somewhere too. Then you can choose your own source of bleach and dilute to suit.


I was thinking that the benzalkonium chloride based stuff might be more effective than chlorine, but as this stuff isn't algae, I don't know. Benzalkonium chloride is also a good bactericide, but again with this organism - lord knows.  If bleach or this did work, but didn't completely nail the stuff, then it'll probably just grow back.  

This article suggests "cultural" control methods, then mancozeb or chlorothalonil fungicide for chemical control.  You can buy pesticides with these ingredients, but doesn't look like there's anything "on label" suggesting they could or should be used for controlling this stuff.

Perhaps if copper works, then rather than copper sulphate which will disappear quickly, a copper oxychloride fungicide might be better.



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  # 1381067 7-Sep-2015 12:41
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peejayw:

I have found spraying with cheap homebrand bleach will work, but takes a month or two to break it down. If you leave it for a few minutes, it will show any spots you have missed, as the bleach will lighten the mould.

I did use an algaecide / moss killer  with good results, but seems more difficult to locate these days.


Do you recall what strength you used the bleach at? I was thinking of getting some cheap swimming pool chlorine and making a solution from that but no idea what strength to use.


It was the standard 4% sodium hypochlorite.  The budget brand seems to be more dilute though (2.5%?)

http://www.downgardenservices.org.uk/bluegreenalgae.htm
When dry they can look unsightly and when wet they can be very slippery. The bead-like form can be swept up and the rubbery sheets are easily lifted. The loose jelly can be swept up as well. On hard surfaces bleach (20% Sodium Hypochlorite dairy cleanser from farm suppliers) applied to the hydrated algae, or another such cleaner should kill any that remains. Improve the drainage and fertility in the lawn to discourage its growth.


I haven't tried the copper anti-fungal methods others have mentioned, but it's not a fungus, it's an algae. Hence why glycophos doesn't affect it.




My thoughts are no longer my own and is probably representative of our media-controlled government


 
 
 
 


8596 posts

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  # 1381120 7-Sep-2015 13:38
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SepticSceptic:
peejayw:

I have found spraying with cheap homebrand bleach will work, but takes a month or two to break it down. If you leave it for a few minutes, it will show any spots you have missed, as the bleach will lighten the mould.

I did use an algaecide / moss killer  with good results, but seems more difficult to locate these days.


Do you recall what strength you used the bleach at? I was thinking of getting some cheap swimming pool chlorine and making a solution from that but no idea what strength to use.


It was the standard 4% sodium hypochlorite.  The budget brand seems to be more dilute though (2.5%?)

http://www.downgardenservices.org.uk/bluegreenalgae.htm
When dry they can look unsightly and when wet they can be very slippery. The bead-like form can be swept up and the rubbery sheets are easily lifted. The loose jelly can be swept up as well. On hard surfaces bleach (20% Sodium Hypochlorite dairy cleanser from farm suppliers) applied to the hydrated algae, or another such cleaner should kill any that remains. Improve the drainage and fertility in the lawn to discourage its growth.


I haven't tried the copper anti-fungal methods others have mentioned, but it's not a fungus, it's an algae. Hence why glycophos doesn't affect it.


It's not really an "algae" either, but a more primitive and unrelated "blue-green algae".

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  # 1381126 7-Sep-2015 13:47
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Had to deal with it on a concrete driveway on the famr i grew up on. Was an organic farm so no chemicals.
Match and diesel works the best.
Never saw it since.

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  # 1381653 8-Sep-2015 11:05
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It's type of microorganism called a cyano-bacteria - sort of cross between an algae and a bacteria.  It's a colony of individual bacteria.

Whatever you do you won't kill every last cell and it will return.  It likes a damp environment with phosphates (fertilisers), so drainage of the area where it grows (if possible) is the best prevention.

Control options you could try, which will need to be repeated include scraping of the bulk of the material and dosing the rest with: -

Salt: It's tolerant to brackish water so you may kill it with very salty conditions.
Acid: It likes alkaline conditions, so a milder acid like vinegar may kill it.
Copper: Copper is generally toxic so copper hydroxy-chloride is definitely worth a go.
Bleach: Will work, but functions by oxidising organic matter, rather than as a toxin.  So you will to repeatedly spray it with bleach.
QAC's: Cleaning compounds called Quaternary Aluminum Compounds.  Not sure if these are available to the public, but they are widely used in food processing premises to tackle bacteria films.  Safety Note: QACs must be kept separate from bleaches.




Mike

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