Geekzone: technology news, blogs, forums
Guest
Welcome Guest.
You haven't logged in yet. If you don't have an account you can register now.




205 posts

Master Geek
+1 received by user: 9


Topic # 179412 7-Sep-2015 19:07
Send private message

Normally I would think a quality product will be backed with nicer warranty, especially when manufacture/retailer has confidence in that. But why Ozito power tools generally have better warranty terms then many "trade quality" tools?

I'm looking for a small router for some I suppose easy edge shape and cut job. I'm thinking Ryobi 18V battery powered one, 99 dollars and 2 year warranty, as I have 2 Ryobi 1.3A 18V Li batteries already. But also think a mains powered one might be better? Suddenly I see the Ozito 350W for only 69 dollars, with more accessories and a 3 year replacement warranty. 

Any thoughts? ( I don't do trade work for a living, the current project is a small coffee table.)











View this topic in a long page with up to 500 replies per page Create new topic
 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5
17 posts

Geek
+1 received by user: 3


  Reply # 1381307 7-Sep-2015 19:11
Send private message

If the brand name doesn't give you an idea of quality, offering a longer warranty period at least tells the consumer they think it will last 

3500 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 1586

Subscriber

  Reply # 1381309 7-Sep-2015 19:15
Send private message

"Suddenly I saw the Ozito 350W for only 69 dollars, with more accessories and 3 year replacement warranty."

I know and use Ryobi tools - reliable & perfectly OK for domestic use.

Never heard of Ozito - the "3 year replacement warranty" sounds too good to be true, so it probably is ...




Sideface


 
 
 
 


16339 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 1895

Trusted

  Reply # 1381315 7-Sep-2015 19:22
Send private message

Replaced by warranty or not, if a tool doesn't help but hinder you, it's useless. But hinder is not the name as broken, so your warranty is useless.



205 posts

Master Geek
+1 received by user: 9


  Reply # 1381316 7-Sep-2015 19:24
One person supports this post
Send private message

Sideface: "Suddenly I saw the Ozito 350W for only 69 dollars, with more accessories and 3 year replacement warranty."

I know and use Ryobi tools - reliable & perfectly OK for domestic use.

Never heard of Ozito - the "3 year replacement warranty" sounds too good to be true, so it probably is ...


I guess at least bunnings has to replace the tool if it goes wrong. I have a Ozito Circular saw, with very rare use it does the job fine. The only condition which will void the warranty written on the manual is to replacing the motor brush when worn, which I think is very fair.

So maybe bunnings' bet is that average home user will not use power tools often enough so even an Ozito should last 3 years easily?   

gzt

8689 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 1107


  Reply # 1381317 7-Sep-2015 19:24
2 people support this post
Send private message

Because the majority of those ozito buyers will use it only a few times in three years and ozito know that. Very few people will be silly enough to try and earn a living with one, and then there is probably a trade exclusion in the warranty anyway.

Makita is a trade tool.



205 posts

Master Geek
+1 received by user: 9


  Reply # 1381321 7-Sep-2015 19:33
Send private message

gzt: Because the majority of those ozito buyers will use it only a few times in three years and ozito know that. Very few people will be silly enough to try and earn a living with one, and then there is probably a trade exclusion in the warranty anyway.

Makita is a trade tool.


That makes sense. But even Ozito drills have 3 year replacement warranty as well. I would normally think even a diyer would use the drill much more often than a router. According to the manual of my Ozito saw, there is no abnormal terms in the warranty section. 

Anyway, I didn't buy Ozito cordless drills because I found out that the cheap Ozito models have low torque and etc, while the powerful Ozito models are not really cheap.

12561 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 1403


  Reply # 1381328 7-Sep-2015 19:44
One person supports this post
Send private message

IMO and IANAL, the terms and conditions for those cheap 3 year warranty ones probably say you can't use them for trade use. The makita one probably says you can. Whatever the case, if you buy the makita one for personal use, you should still covered by the CGA, which overrides any warranty.

3500 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 1586

Subscriber

  Reply # 1381330 7-Sep-2015 19:45
Send private message

"Cheap and crappy" tools are cheap and crappy.

If they fail within the warranty period, the best case scenario is that you get another cheap and crappy tool.

Avoid.




Sideface


1507 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 213


  Reply # 1381332 7-Sep-2015 19:53
2 people support this post
Send private message

Much like cash back deals, they may also be banking on the fact that it probably won't be claimed. Chances are by the time it dies you will have lost the receipt and the box it came in and write it off as a cheap tool. I have bought Ozito branded blades for my planer and they may actually have been made of cheese. If their router is similar, get a good set of name brand bits for it and it may be alright. That does kind of defeat the point of buying it cheap upfront though.




Try Vultr using this link and get us both some credit:

 

http://www.vultr.com/?ref=7033587-3B




205 posts

Master Geek
+1 received by user: 9


  Reply # 1381333 7-Sep-2015 19:59
Send private message

Sideface: "Cheap and crappy" tools are cheap and crappy.

If they fail within the warranty period, the best case scenario is that you get another cheap and crappy tool.

Avoid.


I agree with you for that point. But it doesn't make sense for bunnings as they would have unnecessary high risk of loose margin/money if these cheap tools are crapy for reliability.



205 posts

Master Geek
+1 received by user: 9


  Reply # 1381335 7-Sep-2015 20:03
Send private message

paulmilbank: Much like cash back deals, they may also be banking on the fact that it probably won't be claimed. Chances are by the time it dies you will have lost the receipt and the box it came in and write it off as a cheap tool. I have bought Ozito branded blades for my planer and they may actually have been made of cheese. If their router is similar, get a good set of name brand bits for it and it may be alright. That does kind of defeat the point of buying it cheap upfront though.


I think the router doesn't come with any bit just like many expensive brands. I have an Ozito circular saw, but I don't have a good blade to compare so cannot comment on the supplied blade quality. 

I don't know about others but I always photocopied the thermal printed receipt and also keep an electronic copy in the email for anything I think that might break during the warranty period. :D

Yes for a router it make less sense to buy a cheap model because the bits are always quite expensive unless its a one-off job and only require few simple bits. I need to think about this.......:D

3500 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 1586

Subscriber

  Reply # 1381338 7-Sep-2015 20:05
Send private message

Huchiz:
Sideface: "Cheap and crappy" tools are cheap and crappy.

If they fail within the warranty period, the best case scenario is that you get another cheap and crappy tool.

Avoid.


I agree with you for that point. But it doesn't make sense for bunnings as they would have unnecessary high risk of loose margin/money if these cheap tools are crapy for reliability.


It makes complete sense - paulmilbank gives you the business model (see above).




Sideface




205 posts

Master Geek
+1 received by user: 9


  Reply # 1381339 7-Sep-2015 20:07
Send private message

Sideface:
Huchiz:
Sideface: "Cheap and crappy" tools are cheap and crappy.

If they fail within the warranty period, the best case scenario is that you get another cheap and crappy tool.

Avoid.


I agree with you for that point. But it doesn't make sense for bunnings as they would have unnecessary high risk of loose margin/money if these cheap tools are crapy for reliability.


It makes complete sense - paulmilbank gives you the business model (see above).


OK. :D But the business model doesn't work on me. 

43 posts

Geek
+1 received by user: 9


  Reply # 1381341 7-Sep-2015 20:08
Send private message

As far as I am aware, Makita NZ warranty is for three years for the tool and one year for batteries, I don't think the Makita tools from Bunnings are bought through Makita NZ, a little bit like DSE with Apple gear.

All my Makita battery tools have a three year warranty for the tool, they are used at least one hour each per day minimum.

Ozito and Ryobi tools are fantastic value for money and I have never heard of a problem with these, even with the tools used for trade use (boatbuilding).
If you do not use a certain tool for hours each day, go the Ozito or Ryobi. If you don't want to burst into tears when you drop your $600 Makita tool off two stories of scaffolding, buy Ozito or Ryobi.

If you earn your living relying on your tools, buy what you trust that will not let you down day or night, wet or dry. (Festool and Makita owner)

3500 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 1586

Subscriber

  Reply # 1381364 7-Sep-2015 20:15
Send private message

Huchiz:
Sideface:
Huchiz:
Sideface: "Cheap and crappy" tools are cheap and crappy.

If they fail within the warranty period, the best case scenario is that you get another cheap and crappy tool.

Avoid.


I agree with you for that point. But it doesn't make sense for bunnings as they would have unnecessary high risk of loose margin/money if these cheap tools are crapy for reliability.


It makes complete sense - paulmilbank gives you the business model (see above).


OK. :D But the business model doesn't work on me. 


But you are exceptional smile

Joe Bloggs does not keep receipts.




Sideface


 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5
View this topic in a long page with up to 500 replies per page Create new topic



Twitter »

Follow us to receive Twitter updates when new discussions are posted in our forums:



Follow us to receive Twitter updates when news items and blogs are posted in our frontpage:



Follow us to receive Twitter updates when tech item prices are listed in our price comparison site:





News »

Red Hat unveils production-ready open source hyperconverged infrastructure
Posted 23-Jun-2017 22:10


Whatever ailed Vodafone broadband … seems to be fixed
Posted 23-Jun-2017 14:10


VMware NSX Meets Stringent Government Security Standards with Common Criteria Certification
Posted 22-Jun-2017 19:05


Brother launches next-generation colour laser printers and all-in- ones for business
Posted 22-Jun-2017 18:56


Intel and IOC announce partnership
Posted 22-Jun-2017 18:50


Samsung Galaxy Tab S3: Best Android tablet
Posted 21-Jun-2017 12:05


Wellington-based company helping secure Microsoft browsers
Posted 20-Jun-2017 20:51


Endace delivers high performance with new 1/10/40 Gbps packet capture card
Posted 20-Jun-2017 20:50


You can now integrate SMX security into Microsoft Office 365, Google and other cloud email platforms
Posted 20-Jun-2017 20:47


Ravensdown launches new decision-making tool HawkEye
Posted 19-Jun-2017 15:38


Spark planning to take on direct management of all consumer stores
Posted 19-Jun-2017 10:03


Qrious acquires Ubiquity
Posted 14-Jun-2017 12:21


Spark New Zealand prepares for 5G with Nokia
Posted 14-Jun-2017 12:16


The future-proof 10.5-inch iPad Pro
Posted 13-Jun-2017 18:16


Mandatory data breach reporting in Australia
Posted 13-Jun-2017 11:30



Geekzone Live »

Try automatic live updates from Geekzone directly in your browser, without refreshing the page, with Geekzone Live now.



Are you subscribed to our RSS feed? You can download the latest headlines and summaries from our stories directly to your computer or smartphone by using a feed reader.

Alternatively, you can receive a daily email with Geekzone updates.