Geekzone: technology news, blogs, forums
Guest
Welcome Guest.
You haven't logged in yet. If you don't have an account you can register now.




1341 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 62


Topic # 180635 15-Sep-2015 21:53
Send private message

Hi everyone.

I just wanted to get some quick feedback from everyone regarding minor dwellings. I am looking to put in an offer on a house that has a minor dwelling. The dwelling does not have any consents but it has been built quite nicely (everything was done properly according to the vendor). The right tradesman were used etc. From the looks of it, it does look quite solid and the workmanship does seem quite nice. The vendor is currently living in there and their son & family are living in the main house.

So my question is, how easy would it be to get a COA from the council. Or - would there be a big issue with the minor dwelling if I chose to not get COA at present and get it in the near future when cashflow is not as restricted (with a new mortgage and all). 

What are some of the things the council looks at? What would be some reasons that the council does not give the COA and demands that the minor dwelling be taken down. 

Thank you everyone. Just trying to get into my first home and these things are very important as it can be super costly in the future otherwise. 
BTW - i wont be holding anyone responsible for what they say here, I would just like some feedback :).

Create new topic
1232 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 68

Subscriber

  Reply # 1388264 15-Sep-2015 22:00
Send private message

You perhaps need to get the original plans / drawings used to create that small additional dwelling on the property you are looking at. The local council would ideally want to know how it was constructed and if it was constructed to codes / requirements e.g. construction methods, materials, considering effects from wind, weather, insulation, foundation engineering etc etc.

If there isnt anything on record with the council regarding this dwelling then it should ring alarm bells as how did they manage to connect it to the town water and waste water network (assuming it has water supply and a toilet/bathroom and kitchen).  

When was the dwelling built? 
Im assuming there is no code of compliance given you said there are no original resource consents ! 


1502 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 438

Subscriber

  Reply # 1388268 15-Sep-2015 22:19
Send private message

Just walk away from the deal. You are opening yourself up for a world of pain and your bank may be very hesitant to lend on a property like that. It'll also be very hard to sell if and when you need to get out.

I know it's attractive due to the income part of the property but it really isn't worth it.

 
 
 
 




1341 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 62


  Reply # 1388286 15-Sep-2015 22:47
Send private message

Handle9: Just walk away from the deal. You are opening yourself up for a world of pain and your bank may be very hesitant to lend on a property like that. It'll also be very hard to sell if and when you need to get out.

I know it's attractive due to the income part of the property but it really isn't worth it.


Hm, just had a chat with a couple of my other friends as well. They agreed - it may seem like quite a good deal for now - but they raised the bank issue as well as trying to sell the house in the future. 

Ahh, back to the hunt. The auckland market is quite ridiculous at this stage. Really leaves us first home buyers nowhere. 

1757 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 108

Subscriber

  Reply # 1388385 16-Sep-2015 09:17
Send private message

It will probably depend on what the dwelling has in it. Bedrooms, kitchen and a bathroom? Good luck. Just a living space and bedroom? Might have a shot. 

Worst case scenario is that the council asks you to remove the dwelling. 

Best case scenario is you get a Certificate of Acceptance which is good, but still not great. 

You would need to weigh up whether the extra dwelling is adding any value to the property, if not then go for it, as if you have to rip it down then it doesn't really affect you. If it is a major selling point then I would walk away. Council's are under no obligation to provide you with a coa. Inspections will need to be made, and builders/contractors may need to be contacted. If they don't want to lay claim to their work on it then you might have a decent fight on your hands. 



1341 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 62


  Reply # 1388389 16-Sep-2015 09:22
Send private message

Disrespective: It will probably depend on what the dwelling has in it. Bedrooms, kitchen and a bathroom? Good luck. Just a living space and bedroom? Might have a shot. 

Worst case scenario is that the council asks you to remove the dwelling. 

Best case scenario is you get a Certificate of Acceptance which is good, but still not great. 

You would need to weigh up whether the extra dwelling is adding any value to the property, if not then go for it, as if you have to rip it down then it doesn't really affect you. If it is a major selling point then I would walk away. Council's are under no obligation to provide you with a coa. Inspections will need to be made, and builders/contractors may need to be contacted. If they don't want to lay claim to their work on it then you might have a decent fight on your hands. 


I have certainly seen it as an advantage towards the property (it isnt sub-dividable or anything). The dwelling does have a kitchnette + bathroom. From wht the vendor has said, she reckons that since there is a kitchen sink, that would not be permitted. But a bathroom is fine. So that is one of the things I would need to remove if i was to get a COA.

But from the general consensus, it doesnt seem like it is worth the risk.

1087 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 109

Trusted
Subscriber

  Reply # 1388416 16-Sep-2015 10:13
One person supports this post
Send private message

Make the COA a condition of sale for the Vendor to sort out seeing that "everything was done properly". Without the inspections etc, I'd expect it to be very very hard to get one.

2038 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 212

Subscriber

  Reply # 1388450 16-Sep-2015 11:12
Send private message

Krishant007: But from the general consensus, it doesnt seem like it is worth the risk.


That all depends on the price.  You may be able to get the property at a very good price because the problems will scare off a lot of people.  It all depends on whether you think you can solve the problem.

118 posts

Master Geek
+1 received by user: 7


  Reply # 1388718 16-Sep-2015 21:12
Send private message

When was the sleepout built?

If prior to 1991(Building Act) the council won't care about it unless it poses a danger to somebody. If it was buit prior to 1991 you can get a building inspector to check it out and give it the all clear.

Recently went through this with a house I sold. If you talk to the council about it make sure you take notes of the conversation and get them to read and sign the bottom of the notes before you leave - this drives them nuts.

Create new topic



Twitter »

Follow us to receive Twitter updates when new discussions are posted in our forums:



Follow us to receive Twitter updates when news items and blogs are posted in our frontpage:



Follow us to receive Twitter updates when tech item prices are listed in our price comparison site:





News »

IDC thinks ANZ is a nation
Posted 27-Jul-2017 11:51


British new home buyers see ultrafast broadband as vital
Posted 27-Jul-2017 09:46


Australians want NZ-style gigabit, but for less
Posted 27-Jul-2017 08:57


Push notifications: A productivity killer
Posted 25-Jul-2017 14:15


Intergen takes SKYCITY to the cloud
Posted 25-Jul-2017 14:04


Nothing nebulous about Microsoft’s cloud-transition
Posted 21-Jul-2017 15:34


We’re spending more on tech, but not as much as Australians
Posted 21-Jul-2017 11:43


Endace announces EndaceFabric for network-wide packet recording
Posted 20-Jul-2017 20:49


Acorn 6: MacOS image editing for the rest of us
Posted 20-Jul-2017 17:04


HTC faces backlash over keyboard pop-up ads
Posted 19-Jul-2017 15:53


BNZ adds Visa credit cards to Android Pay wallet
Posted 18-Jul-2017 19:44


Still living in a Notification hell – Om Malik
Posted 18-Jul-2017 13:00


Duet Display uses iPad to extend Mac, PC
Posted 18-Jul-2017 10:58


PC sales could be worse
Posted 17-Jul-2017 07:34


Crypto-currencies, tulips, market bubbles
Posted 17-Jul-2017 06:38



Geekzone Live »

Try automatic live updates from Geekzone directly in your browser, without refreshing the page, with Geekzone Live now.



Are you subscribed to our RSS feed? You can download the latest headlines and summaries from our stories directly to your computer or smartphone by using a feed reader.

Alternatively, you can receive a daily email with Geekzone updates.