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  Reply # 1435702 27-Nov-2015 00:57
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jonathan18:
Jase2985: i would need to save 8% in their hour of power to even start breaking even on what im currently paying

there is not a lot we could shift into any of those periods to save much there

Is there a way on the flick website to estimate what your bill will be?

ive use whatsmynumber and powerswitch but they are not that great


Not that I ever found. They do provide the costs of the other component costs such as lines charges (by region under pricing) but as their own rate is market plus margin they don't provide that. Give them a call and perhaps they can provide you with some comparisons based on your own usage.

I'm yet to read of members here who are paying more through Flick than with alternatives, but personally I'm not counting my chickens until they survive the coming summer.


You can download the historical spot prices right here. You will need your historical half-hourly usage to make this useful, only some retailers such as Powershop will have this available.

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  Reply # 1435973 27-Nov-2015 12:39
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mad01: I've been with them for a few months.

For info, my rates in Christchurch:
Your current electricity rates are: Pay for what you use:
$0.23 per kWh; Plus a fixed cost of:
$0.84 per day



Looks more to me like they're offsetting cheaper per kWh with an higher per day charge


for example mine are 

Per kWh: $0.3032  and
per day: $0.3750

 
 
 
 


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  Reply # 1436162 27-Nov-2015 16:15
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Athlonite:
mad01: I've been with them for a few months.

For info, my rates in Christchurch:
Your current electricity rates are: Pay for what you use:
$0.23 per kWh; Plus a fixed cost of:
$0.84 per day



Looks more to me like they're offsetting cheaper per kWh with an higher per day charge


for example mine are 

Per kWh: $0.3032  and
per day: $0.3750



That'll be the difference between a Low User and Standard User tariff. Anything 30c-ish / day is Low User, anything more like $1-$2 / day is Standard. Low User rates are higher per kWh to make up the difference.

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  Reply # 1437205 29-Nov-2015 12:59
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fortydayweekend:
Athlonite:
mad01: I've been with them for a few months.

For info, my rates in Christchurch:
Your current electricity rates are: Pay for what you use:
$0.23 per kWh; Plus a fixed cost of:
$0.84 per day



Looks more to me like they're offsetting cheaper per kWh with an higher per day charge


for example mine are 

Per kWh: $0.3032  and
per day: $0.3750



That'll be the difference between a Low User and Standard User tariff. Anything 30c-ish / day is Low User, anything more like $1-$2 / day is Standard. Low User rates are higher per kWh to make up the difference.


I'm not on a low user tariff well not according to my bill seeing as I use more the 8000kW a year 

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  Reply # 1440611 4-Dec-2015 15:54
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Athlonite:
fortydayweekend:
Athlonite:
mad01: I've been with them for a few months.

For info, my rates in Christchurch:
Your current electricity rates are: Pay for what you use:
$0.23 per kWh; Plus a fixed cost of:
$0.84 per day



Looks more to me like they're offsetting cheaper per kWh with an higher per day charge


for example mine are 

Per kWh: $0.3032  and
per day: $0.3750



That'll be the difference between a Low User and Standard User tariff. Anything 30c-ish / day is Low User, anything more like $1-$2 / day is Standard. Low User rates are higher per kWh to make up the difference.


I'm not on a low user tariff well not according to my bill seeing as I use more the 8000kW a year 



If you're paying 30c / day plus GST after discounts, you're on a Low User tariff. If you're using more than 8000 kWh a year, you're probably better off changing to a Standard tariff.

Being on the cheaper tariff isn't automatic :)



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  Reply # 1589568 11-Jul-2016 12:19
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Just received:

 

 

Feeling the cold? Keeping warm this winter just got more affordable as smaller, smarter online power retailer, Electric Kiwi, has just entered the Taupo, Hawke’s Bay and Rotorua regions. What’s more, it guarantees it will cut at least $200 from your annual power bill.

 

As one of New Zealand’s most innovative power retailers, Electric Kiwi capitalises on the smart meter installed in your home to deliver electricity more efficiently - and therefore, at a lower cost. “We’re delighted to be able to offer affordable power to more regions and we’re thrilled to enter the new markets,” says Electric Kiwi managing director Julian Kardos.
The company has developed super-efficient systems and processes which make it less costly to keep homes warm.

 

Simplicity is a driving force for Electric Kiwi. “We know our customers just want low cost, reliable electricity every day. We’ve designed our systems to work for people and that includes making it easy to sign up and get sorted with no fuss and no hassle,” Kardos explains.

 

This is down to the company making extensive use of web-based technology. Because Electric Kiwi is 100 per cent online it has made it easy for customers to change power suppliers. Electric Kiwi’s online sign up process means customers just have to enter a few details online and the remainder of the switch process is automated. You can also chat with a service representative on the website, on social media, email or if you wish, they’ll call you back at your convenience.

 

But it is the smart meter, installed in around 70 per cent of all Kiwi households, which is at the heart of Electric Kiwi’s ability to keep costs lower. Kardos explains: “Though smart meters are in use across the country, most other electricity companies don’t do anything smart with them. We’ve created ways for customers to benefit every day from the extra information provided by the smart meter. By analysing our customers’ power use overall, we can optimise the cost of our wholesale electricity purchases - helping us to deliver low power prices, 365 days a year.”

 

Electric Kiwi is so sure they can save you money with their smart approach to electricity, they guarantee a $200 annual saving in your first year.
Another innovation introduced by the company is its free off-peak ‘Hour of Power’. For one hour every day, outside 7-9am and 5-9pm slots, every Electric Kiwi customer doesn’t pay for electricity. That means you can run the washing machine, the dishwasher and other power hungry appliances at this time, with the meter suspended. “It’s an easy way to boost your power savings every day,” says Kardos.

 

Already operating in 12 regions across the North and South Islands, Electric Kiwi is one of the country’s fastest growing electricity retailers, thanks to its customer service excellence and the delivery of those guaranteed savings.

 





2662 posts

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  Reply # 1589609 11-Jul-2016 12:38
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freitasm:

 

Just received:

 

 

Feeling the cold? Keeping warm this winter just got more affordable as smaller, smarter online power retailer, Electric Kiwi, has just entered the Taupo, Hawke’s Bay and Rotorua regions. What’s more, it guarantees it will cut at least $200 from your annual power bill.

 

As one of New Zealand’s most innovative power retailers, Electric Kiwi capitalises on the smart meter installed in your home to deliver electricity more efficiently - and therefore, at a lower cost. “We’re delighted to be able to offer affordable power to more regions and we’re thrilled to enter the new markets,” says Electric Kiwi managing director Julian Kardos.
The company has developed super-efficient systems and processes which make it less costly to keep homes warm.

 

Simplicity is a driving force for Electric Kiwi. “We know our customers just want low cost, reliable electricity every day. We’ve designed our systems to work for people and that includes making it easy to sign up and get sorted with no fuss and no hassle,” Kardos explains.

 

This is down to the company making extensive use of web-based technology. Because Electric Kiwi is 100 per cent online it has made it easy for customers to change power suppliers. Electric Kiwi’s online sign up process means customers just have to enter a few details online and the remainder of the switch process is automated. You can also chat with a service representative on the website, on social media, email or if you wish, they’ll call you back at your convenience.

 

But it is the smart meter, installed in around 70 per cent of all Kiwi households, which is at the heart of Electric Kiwi’s ability to keep costs lower. Kardos explains: “Though smart meters are in use across the country, most other electricity companies don’t do anything smart with them. We’ve created ways for customers to benefit every day from the extra information provided by the smart meter. By analysing our customers’ power use overall, we can optimise the cost of our wholesale electricity purchases - helping us to deliver low power prices, 365 days a year.”

 

Electric Kiwi is so sure they can save you money with their smart approach to electricity, they guarantee a $200 annual saving in your first year.
Another innovation introduced by the company is its free off-peak ‘Hour of Power’. For one hour every day, outside 7-9am and 5-9pm slots, every Electric Kiwi customer doesn’t pay for electricity. That means you can run the washing machine, the dishwasher and other power hungry appliances at this time, with the meter suspended. “It’s an easy way to boost your power savings every day,” says Kardos.

 

Already operating in 12 regions across the North and South Islands, Electric Kiwi is one of the country’s fastest growing electricity retailers, thanks to its customer service excellence and the delivery of those guaranteed savings.

 

 

 

I wonder if that "guarantee" to save at least $200 in the first year applies to those who switch over from Flick? And how would the relative cost be calculated in Flick's case (given it's rates are ever-changing)?

 

I see the hour of "free power" seems a lot more flexible than originally offered, which allowed the user to select one of two hours our of 24; the press release above indicates it's any hour other than 7-9am or 5-9pm. That's far more useful, eg we could select 6-7am, which in winter would be ideal as our central heating starts at 6am so as to have the house warm by the time we get up.

 

Will investigate further...


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  Reply # 1589623 11-Jul-2016 13:01
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mattwnz: Have to cross them off my list, as they don't buy back generated power.

 

 

 

We are in the same boat, but I spoke with Solar City and as long as you don't want payment for the solar you generate then you can use them or any company you wish.

 

There is another peer to peer company that buys your generated solar power p2power.co.nz

 

haven't look into yet but that may be an option.


536 posts

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  Reply # 1589677 11-Jul-2016 13:36
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p2 looks pretty damn interesting...am with Meridian at the moment (and they do 7 and 10c for summer/winter buy back)...these guys are 16c for the first 50kw (per fortnight) and then 8c per kw flat, but their rates of buying electricity are cheaper too....anyone heard anything about them? Didn't even know they existed tbh...


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  Reply # 1589719 11-Jul-2016 14:56
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jonathan18:

 

I wonder if that "guarantee" to save at least $200 in the first year applies to those who switch over from Flick? And how would the relative cost be calculated in Flick's case (given it's rates are ever-changing)?

 

I see the hour of "free power" seems a lot more flexible than originally offered, which allowed the user to select one of two hours our of 24; the press release above indicates it's any hour other than 7-9am or 5-9pm. That's far more useful, eg we could select 6-7am, which in winter would be ideal as our central heating starts at 6am so as to have the house warm by the time we get up.

 

Will investigate further...

 

 

I thought it just added up your savings from the Hour of Power. I just logged in now and see
'You're on your way to save $1328 this year'

 

So the $200 gaurantee is irrelevant for me, I'm almost at that now after 1.5 months.

 

There is another thread on this site here: http://www.geekzone.co.nz/forums.asp?forumid=164&topicid=196633&page_no=3

 

On page 3 I describe how I use Electric Kiwi and the savings I make and the way I intend for my friends and family to save a couple of months worth of power each year.

 

It's a pretty nice company from what I can see. The web UI isn't quite as detailed as Powersghop was, but still good enough.


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  Reply # 1589735 11-Jul-2016 15:34
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michael001:

 

I thought it just added up your savings from the Hour of Power. I just logged in now and see
'You're on your way to save $1328 this year'

 

So the $200 gaurantee is irrelevant for me, I'm almost at that now after 1.5 months.

 

There is another thread on this site here: http://www.geekzone.co.nz/forums.asp?forumid=164&topicid=196633&page_no=3

 

On page 3 I describe how I use Electric Kiwi and the savings I make and the way I intend for my friends and family to save a couple of months worth of power each year.

 

It's a pretty nice company from what I can see. The web UI isn't quite as detailed as Powersghop was, but still good enough.

 

 

So what are they comparing the $200 saving with - what it would have otherwise cost without the "free hour"? The prices one would have paid with one's previous provider? If the latter, that's why I raise the questions regarding Flick, as already it can offer (and does provide for me) considerably cheaper power than the conventional providers. I'd be interested if they can promise I'd save $200 over a year compared to what I currently pay to Flick.

 

The return on the "free hour" of power will be directly proportionate to how much you can timeshift to this period - in your case you've been able to switch a lot, but for others it'll be far less. For example, we have gas hot water so no return there; I can only see the central heating being a key user for us, with much more minor gains from the washing machine and dishwasher (given we hardly use the latter).

 

 


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  Reply # 1589784 11-Jul-2016 16:07
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jonathan18:

 

michael001:

 

I thought it just added up your savings from the Hour of Power. I just logged in now and see
'You're on your way to save $1328 this year'

 

So the $200 gaurantee is irrelevant for me, I'm almost at that now after 1.5 months.

 

There is another thread on this site here: http://www.geekzone.co.nz/forums.asp?forumid=164&topicid=196633&page_no=3

 

On page 3 I describe how I use Electric Kiwi and the savings I make and the way I intend for my friends and family to save a couple of months worth of power each year.

 

It's a pretty nice company from what I can see. The web UI isn't quite as detailed as Powersghop was, but still good enough.

 

 

So what are they comparing the $200 saving with - what it would have otherwise cost without the "free hour"? The prices one would have paid with one's previous provider? If the latter, that's why I raise the questions regarding Flick, as already it can offer (and does provide for me) considerably cheaper power than the conventional providers. I'd be interested if they can promise I'd save $200 over a year compared to what I currently pay to Flick.

 

The return on the "free hour" of power will be directly proportionate to how much you can timeshift to this period - in your case you've been able to switch a lot, but for others it'll be far less. For example, we have gas hot water so no return there; I can only see the central heating being a key user for us, with much more minor gains from the washing machine and dishwasher (given we hardly use the latter).

 

 

You supply one of your power bills from the previous supplier. I didn't / couldn't because I was with Powershop, I didn't get a power bill as such like I do now.

 

I do know though that my house is very warm now (heat pump on 5x more than what it was) and my whole house is warm in the mornings which it never was and my power bills are much less than they were.

 

All I had to do was shift a couple of showers by an hour and put the dishwasher/washing machine on at the same time each day. Not too shabby.


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