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  Reply # 1485981 5-Feb-2016 15:15
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Talked to a very good electrician today, who did my bathroom wiring. He said:

 

  • A timer costs around $100
  • I'd need a larger relay. While a $100 timer can switch a 13A cylinder they tend to wear out pretty quickly. Another $100
  • 1.5 hours of time

Total around $400 inc GST. My best guess is this could save 20c of power per day when prices are low, 50c on an average day, and $1 or a bit more on a day where evening prices are quite high - late summer, early winter, or any time the hydro lakes are low. Given they're turning off another power station in a year or two the payback time could come back, I doubt it will get worse.

 

So I think the payback time is at least a year, probably two years. Not sure it's worth it for the money, more for the interest factor. If I could get the parts and install cheaper, sure it's worth it, but $400 is a lot more than I expected to pay. I'll get onto my neighbor the electrician to see if he can do it cheaper before I decide.





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  Reply # 1489903 10-Feb-2016 18:35
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Trying to decide what to do here for new build.. by default they were going to put hot water onto standard rate power. I asked for a relay which then in turn I could control with a Z-Wave relay, but was offered to wire it for night rate power. I then asked for a timer, but that is $265+GST.

 

Perhaps I'll just go with the night rate option for now..

 

In Christchurch the (interesting) options for ripple control are

 

Night only: Provides approximately 7½ hours per night in one or two blocks, between the hours of 9pm and 7am.
Night with afternoon boost: As above but 3 hour boost between 12pm and 4pm in the afternoon
Night and weekends: As above with an additional 4 hour boost between the hours of 9am and 4pm on Saturdays and Sundays.


 
 
 
 


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  Reply # 1489908 10-Feb-2016 18:54
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timmmay I think you could persist with Flick.. This is the response I got from Powershop when I enquired about changing the ripple control options

 

"Turning the ripple relay off would involve a contractor coming to the site. This change would be permanent unless you got a contractor to come out and turn it back on again.

There would be a fee of $65 for this change.

Please advise if you would like to go ahead."

 

I understand they just have to change the ripple control channel to select a different option. Like you say by default they will only control load in peak or emergencies.




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  Reply # 1489951 10-Feb-2016 20:55
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I think I'd rather have the control myself, but thanks for the info.





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  Reply # 1496050 20-Feb-2016 07:07
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My electrician recommended this digital timer (Vemer Memo DW E), which looks fine, and since he recommended it I'm sure it'd be ok. Curious though what the line below means from the specs - it says both 16 and 10A ratings.

 

 

 

Output: 1 monostable change-over contact 16(10)A/250Vac





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  Reply # 1496063 20-Feb-2016 07:40
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Looks good
Yeah the lower rating will be for inductive or load and the 16A for resistive load (I've seen other references to ohmic load, not sure if that is the same as resistive or not)

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  Reply # 1497545 23-Feb-2016 08:31
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I know the topic mentions "Digital Timer" but I had my sparky install a timer for our hot water (its a new build). Based on advice from one of the more experienced sparky's we installed an analog timer. Cost around $350 including installation.

 

This is what has been installed;

 

Click to see full size

 

Specs;

 

http://www.theben.de/en/Products/Time-and-light-control/Analogue-time-switches/DIN-rail/Daily-program/SYN-160-a


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  Reply # 1497547 23-Feb-2016 08:43
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tchart:

 

I know the topic mentions "Digital Timer" but I had my sparky install a timer for our hot water (its a new build). Based on advice from one of the more experienced sparky's we installed an analog timer. Cost around $350 including installation.

 

This is what has been installed;

 

Click to see full size

 

Specs;

 

http://www.theben.de/en/Products/Time-and-light-control/Analogue-time-switches/DIN-rail/Daily-program/SYN-160-a

 

 

Yeap I have a similar timer, replaces the circuit breaker on the hot water circuit.  Fitted when I had Solar PV installed and changed to a single import/export meter.  The additional cost was a about $200 plus GST a few years ago.  I have water heating on during the day when solar is generating power.  It is a good product and works well.

 

 




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  Reply # 1497553 23-Feb-2016 08:58
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tchart:

I know the topic mentions "Digital Timer" but I had my sparky install a timer for our hot water (its a new build). Based on advice from one of the more experienced sparky's we installed an analog timer. Cost around $350 including installation.


This is what has been installed;


Click to see full size


Specs;


http://www.theben.de/en/Products/Time-and-light-control/Analogue-time-switches/DIN-rail/Daily-program/SYN-160-a



Why analog instead of digital?




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  Reply # 1497565 23-Feb-2016 09:17
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Why analog instead of digital?

 

 

 

It is what was recommended by the installers at the time. Simple and robust.

 

I'm interested in other solutions. I haven't had a good run with cheap digital timers and Wifi devices. 

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  Reply # 1497614 23-Feb-2016 10:13
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kotuku4: Why analog instead of digital?   It is what was recommended by the installers at the time. Simple and robust. I'm interested in other solutions. I haven't had a good run with cheap digital timers and Wifi devices. 

 

Yep same argument from my sparky. I asked for digital, he checked with a more experienced sparky and the advice was to get analog over digital for simplicity and longevity.


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  Reply # 1497637 23-Feb-2016 10:36
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Note that some of these timers have built in battery backup, and some don't.  

 

I suggest that you don't get one without battery backup - it's an extra annoyance / clock to reset in case of power outages, and probably something likely to be forgotten.

 

http://www.theben.de/en/Products/Time-and-light-control/Analogue-time-switches/DIN-rail/Daily-program/SYN-160-a (without battery)

 

http://www.theben.de/en/Products/Time-and-light-control/Analogue-time-switches/DIN-rail/Daily-program/SUL-180-a (with battery)




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  Reply # 1497641 23-Feb-2016 10:38
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Interesting about analog being more reliable and long lasting. Anyone else find this? Any evidence or is it all experience based?




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  Reply # 1497645 23-Feb-2016 10:50
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Cant say I agree with a mechanical device with motors and plastic cogs being more reliable than an electronic device.. 


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  Reply # 1497668 23-Feb-2016 11:00
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Lemming:

 

Cant say I agree with a mechanical device with motors and plastic cogs being more reliable than an electronic device.. 

 

 

Mechanical timers have been around since the 1930's some well proven and very reliable designs, digital timers early 80's i'm sure there are also some well proven reliable designs as well, mechnical timers lack accuracy, digital timers can be affected by surges and spikes, cost wise mechanical are cheaper, a mechanical timer for this application would do just fine.


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