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Topic # 193395 9-Mar-2016 13:46
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Hi. 

 

 

 

Was quoted $60m2 ($3500) for relaying our existing tiles and compacting underneath so they don't sink again, and instead of little stones in between them they are going to put some sort of dense sand to stop weeds from growing in between.

 

$3500 seems pricey!

 

I am in Auckland.

 

 

 

What do you guys think?


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  Reply # 1510295 10-Mar-2016 09:01
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It sounds expensive, but if they're going to lift the tiles/pavers, excavate say 100mm of loose soil/fill, replace that with new fill and compact it, then re-lay the pavers, there's quite a lot of work and quite a few m3 of carting in the job.




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  Reply # 1510310 10-Mar-2016 09:24
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Fred99:

 

It sounds expensive, but if they're going to lift the tiles/pavers, excavate say 100mm of loose soil/fill, replace that with new fill and compact it, then re-lay the pavers, there's quite a lot of work and quite a few m3 of carting in the job.

 

 

 

 

I don't think they are intending on taking 100mm off the bottom. The way they were doing it, meant they were going to close the current gaps between each tile, meaning more tiles needed to be purchased. The were also going to use a thing called Pave lock, but to keep the price down they are going to leave the existing gaps when they relay, and still use pave lock. We had little white stones there before, but they got washed away in a series of significant rainfall, and we were going to reinstate them, but they have advised against it, as High Maintenance.

 

I am a little concerned about drainage but they seem confident that with the fall they will create the water will drain elsewhere like the garden around the outside, the lawn and the area behind the lawn where our few fruit trees are. We are now at $2300 which to me still seems like a lot of money for 60m2, but considerably better than $1400 more. 

 

 


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  Reply # 1510896 10-Mar-2016 20:47
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networkn:

 

We are now at $2300 which to me still seems like a lot of money for 60m2, but considerably better than $1400 more. 

 

 

 

 

 

Keep working on them.  With that success rate, in a couple more negotiating cycles, they'll be wanting to pay you to do the job.




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  Reply # 1510959 10-Mar-2016 22:14
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the concern I have, and my wife shares it, is that if they use pavelock, we have no more weeds, but equally no more drainage. We are pretty close to the limit allowed. The issue then becomes, if we don't pave lock, and refill the gaps with little stones as we had done in the past, when heavy rain comes, the stones will again be washed away,and back will come the weeds. 

 

I guess we could get another quote and consider the advice of a second option, but anyone who has any commentary happy to hear it.


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  Reply # 1510991 10-Mar-2016 23:46
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networkn:

 

the concern I have, and my wife shares it, is that if they use pavelock, we have no more weeds, but equally no more drainage. We are pretty close to the limit allowed. The issue then becomes, if we don't pave lock, and refill the gaps with little stones as we had done in the past, when heavy rain comes, the stones will again be washed away,and back will come the weeds. 

 

I guess we could get another quote and consider the advice of a second option, but anyone who has any commentary happy to hear it.

 

 

 

 

If you have got water draining between the tiles, then it is likely to need doing again in a few years anyway. 3.5k sounds far too much. What is their hourly rate, and how many hours have they quoted for? It sounds like it is almost all labour cost. When it was originally installed, they should have installed concrete drainage channels, leading to a sump. Either that, or sloped the path towards gardens to take the water. If you are having it done properly, they are going to need to install compacted hardfill under the sand, and probably install drainage channels. Channels are quite easy and cheap to do from poured concrete. I did mine about 10 years ago, and the tile surface is still flat and true. Tree roots though are the big problem with tiles.


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  Reply # 1511146 11-Mar-2016 10:42
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Having done a bit of paving myself, its not particularly difficult. But to do a good job you need th right tools.

 

For that area, they will probably compact using a plate compactor, this will ensure the ground underneath is flat and "solid". If they are not digging out existing base course, are they allowing for any new base course to be laid down?

 

If they are adding pavers, there will be a need to cut them to fit, either they will use a concrete saw or a tile cutter, depending on the size of tiles/pavers used and finish required.

 

Pavelock doesn't prevent drainage, I have used it to good success. It is essentially a mix of paving sand and cement. It does the same job as paving sand, but sets more solid to prevent movement and inhibits weeds - doesn't mean you won't still get some weeds over time. But it is better than paving sand alone. Pavelock does specify a limit of 20mm between pavers though, so if they aren't moving the pavers closer together, what is the gap?

 

 

 

You might be able to save on some $$ if you lift the pavers yourself too?




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  Reply # 1511148 11-Mar-2016 10:46
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FiggyNZ:

 

Having done a bit of paving myself, its not particularly difficult. But to do a good job you need th right tools.

 

For that area, they will probably compact using a plate compactor, this will ensure the ground underneath is flat and "solid". If they are not digging out existing base course, are they allowing for any new base course to be laid down?

 

If they are adding pavers, there will be a need to cut them to fit, either they will use a concrete saw or a tile cutter, depending on the size of tiles/pavers used and finish required.

 

Pavelock doesn't prevent drainage, I have used it to good success. It is essentially a mix of paving sand and cement. It does the same job as paving sand, but sets more solid to prevent movement and inhibits weeds - doesn't mean you won't still get some weeds over time. But it is better than paving sand alone. Pavelock does specify a limit of 20mm between pavers though, so if they aren't moving the pavers closer together, what is the gap?

 

 

 

You might be able to save on some $$ if you lift the pavers yourself too?

 

 

 

 

Thanks, that is useful information, especially the information about the pave lock and drainage. 

 

The existing gap between pavers is probably 5-10mm certainly not more than that. We have opted to stick with the existing gap because changing the gap requires additional pavers and all the other gear, and that obviously contributed to the higher price we were offered initially. 

 

Without needing to cater for more pavers they have got the price right down, but it still seems quite a lot really.

 

 


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  Reply # 1511158 11-Mar-2016 10:55
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 So they are going to lift the pavers still?

 

If so they will still need:

 

  • Platecompactor - To compact the fill underneath
  • Additional fill - Where there are low points
  • Sand - To lay the pavers back onto to make sure they are seated and level
  • Pavelock - To put in between the pavers and secure them in place.

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  Reply # 1511188 11-Mar-2016 11:24
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Hmm, this sort of job is well within the regular DIY capability. Unless you can make $3600 in a weekend I would set aside a weekend and just do it myself. Use Google, hire the tools, and a little oomph and you will be saving at least a couple of grand.


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  Reply # 1511255 11-Mar-2016 12:27
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UHD:

 

Hmm, this sort of job is well within the regular DIY capability. Unless you can make $3600 in a weekend I would set aside a weekend and just do it myself. Use Google, hire the tools, and a little oomph and you will be saving at least a couple of grand.

 

 

I agree,  Plate compactor only costs about $80/day to hire from tool hire stores - some of the gardening supply places which sell pavers hire them out, as well as supply suitable fill with free trailer hire etc.

 

Not sure if 50m2 or so would be doable on one weekend though.




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  Reply # 1511296 11-Mar-2016 13:16
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Fred99:

 

UHD:

 

Hmm, this sort of job is well within the regular DIY capability. Unless you can make $3600 in a weekend I would set aside a weekend and just do it myself. Use Google, hire the tools, and a little oomph and you will be saving at least a couple of grand.

 

 

I agree,  Plate compactor only costs about $80/day to hire from tool hire stores - some of the gardening supply places which sell pavers hire them out, as well as supply suitable fill with free trailer hire etc.

 

Not sure if 50m2 or so would be doable on one weekend though.

 

 

 

 

I am not the DIY Sort. I certainly couldn't do 60m2 in a weekend, and I don't trust myself to get the "fall" and drainage part correct. 

 

He basically came back and offered $1950 for the job if we go ahead, and we have told them to proceed. 

 

 

 

Thanks for the advice.


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  Reply # 1511549 11-Mar-2016 19:25
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FiggyNZ:

 

 So they are going to lift the pavers still?

 

If so they will still need:

 

  • Platecompactor - To compact the fill underneath
  • Additional fill - Where there are low points
  • Sand - To lay the pavers back onto to make sure they are seated and level
  • Pavelock - To put in between the pavers and secure them in place.

 

 

 

I have never bothered to use pavelock myself, I just use sand, and it seems to be ok. I wonder what else is in it,  as it has a safety sheet at http://www.firth.co.nz/media/119878/pavelock%20%20sds.pdf




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  Reply # 1516094 19-Mar-2016 14:49
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So we signed up with FOS Hardscapes who subsequently I can find NO record of. Things aren't going that well, they have asked for another advance to resolve some drainage issues they have found. Already paid half as a deposit.

 

Is there anywhere I can search (I tried google) to try and get more information. I've ask for a GST Recept. I have a bank account number, and a mobile number and a name and a PO Box number on the invoice. 


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  Reply # 1516943 21-Mar-2016 14:21
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I wouldn't give them another $ until they do the work.  There should be few if any drainage issue with pavers, they are a permeable surface.  edit: the Pavers themselves obviously aren't permeable but the gaps between are.

 

networkn:

 

So we signed up with FOS Hardscapes who subsequently I can find NO record of. Things aren't going that well, they have asked for another advance to resolve some drainage issues they have found. Already paid half as a deposit.

 

Is there anywhere I can search (I tried google) to try and get more information. I've ask for a GST Recept. I have a bank account number, and a mobile number and a name and a PO Box number on the invoice. 

 





Mike



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  Reply # 1516968 21-Mar-2016 14:49
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Well I am not sure about how this works, but they have pulled about 12 pavers up so far and then got string and a level out, and then stopped. I presume it's so they know the level they are trying to reach. I would have thought first job would be to lift all the pavers for the area you are working in. 

 

They are there again today and seem to be making some progress. We will see what happens. 

 

They provided a plan and explanation for drainage, and whilst it didn't seem completely necessary, they are going to take it (The $700) off the quote for the lawn relay they gave us, so other than cashflow it won't "cost" any more. 

 

I told them I wasn't advancing any more funds on work completed and after 2 days they agreed. 

 

I guess we wait and see. 

 

 


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