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mdf



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Topic # 194958 31-Mar-2016 20:49
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I'm planning out the installation of structured ethernet cabling throughout our place. My aim is to do it properly, so am planning out now for renovations that will actually take the next few years (garage is first, natch).

 

I've done a little bit of this, but am at best an enthusiastic amateur. I've read up (on geekzone and elsewhere) about patch panels, star wiring, T568A vs B, cat 6, RG6, punch down tools, cable tests and so on. Hopefully I've now got something of a handle of the fundamentals and if I want to learn anything more, there's no better way than getting your hands dirty.

 

However, in terms of planning the "wiring diagram", I'd be grateful if someone could point me at some further guidance, particularly about things like how far power cables and ethernet should be placed from each other (I gather any crosses should be at right angles). If all goes to plan, there will be an overkill of cables in both walls and ceilings, so want to make sure they go in the best possible places. 

 

I've found a few consumer guides, but have found these to be too basic:

 

I'd like to do most of this myself if time permits, however, even if I get a professional in to do some or all of it, I am keen to know more about best practice. I have been burnt before by sparkies who claim they know their way around data cabling and want to be able to call BS on any claims that "everyone does it like this, it will be fine" from a position of knowledge.

 

And I can confirm that anything involving power will be done by a registered electrician, though perhaps with express instructions as to where cables should go.


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  Reply # 1523585 31-Mar-2016 21:57
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I avoid running cat5 and power together in parallel if at all possible . I have some jack points that are on the other side of a stud from a power point but they work fine - you wont be able to avoid some proximity in some cases.

 

You'll be fine if you keep your long runs 300 mm away from power where possible. Power is at 50 Hz and the signalling in Cat5 is much much higher frequency as well as being differential.

 

It's a very simple concept - one wire from every jack point to the patch panel.

 

Every patch panel port to a switch. Switch to your router.

 

The hard part is wriggling under the house etc.

 

Enjoy your project !

 

 

 

 


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  Reply # 1524302 1-Apr-2016 21:12
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Electrician should sort all the power side out. Have you considered using Cat 6A instead of Cat 6?


 
 
 
 


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  Reply # 1524348 1-Apr-2016 23:01
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http://www.tcf.org.nz/library/85f5318d-fc71-409f-a04d-48ff414107f7.cmr

 

I found it very useful/interesting for when I did my home network. Ran cat 6x6 from a cupboard where the ont was placed to behind tv/media cabinet with two extra runs of 2 each to bedrooms.

 

Have 24 port patch panel which I will add extra runs later.

 

Lists specs for separation of power to data- cable etc.

 

Also look at youtube videos of punch down wiring etc.

 

There was also useful videos on youtube on how to lay cables through walls etc.

 

 

 

A.

 

 

 

 


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  Reply # 1524540 2-Apr-2016 12:05
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From my own experience with doing our home:

 

  • Run galved steel wires (reasonably heavy gauge) under your house to attach the network cable to. These can be run on diagonal lines to save a bit of cable length. You can easily add extra cables to the bundles this way.
  • Drill at least 25 mm holes for cable entry into your house, to allow for more cables in the future.
  • You can block up the holes with steel wool to prevent rodents getting in. The wool can be easily removed if you need to get at your cables.
  • If you're using modular face plates, go for ones with a few extra holes (and get some blank modules for the holes). This way you can add more network outlets at a later date without having to replace your face plates.
  • If you're re-gibbing a room and you're not ready to network it yet, put 25 or 32 mm conduit(s) in to future proof that room.

 


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  Reply # 1524700 2-Apr-2016 17:04
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pipe60:

 

Electrician should sort all the power side out. Have you considered using Cat 6A instead of Cat 6?

 

 

There is absolutely no point in Cat 6A for data.

 

And frankly there is actually no point in Cat 6 either if the use is purely for data - Cat5e is perfectly fine for 1000BASE-T. The only thing Cat6 can be good for is running things like HDMI extenders (the extra MHz Cat6 supports is used). Although then that comes to another point in that I see zero point in distributing uncompressed video  - things like the Raspberry Pi, Roku, Chromecast etc have dealt to that!


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  Reply # 1524706 2-Apr-2016 17:19
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chevrolux:

 

pipe60:

 

Electrician should sort all the power side out. Have you considered using Cat 6A instead of Cat 6?

 

 

There is absolutely no point in Cat 6A for data.

 

And frankly there is actually no point in Cat 6 either if the use is purely for data - Cat5e is perfectly fine for 1000BASE-T. The only thing Cat6 can be good for is running things like HDMI extenders (the extra MHz Cat6 supports is used). Although then that comes to another point in that I see zero point in distributing uncompressed video  - things like the Raspberry Pi, Roku, Chromecast etc have dealt to that!

 

 

Following on - CAT6A, CAT7 cabling systems are specked/designed for cabling up core switching in Data Centres etc when you need max through put on multiple parallel cable links with near zero cross-talk not only within the cable but with other cables in close proximity - not really cost effective or practical for what you would find in a home network situation.


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  Reply # 1525067 3-Apr-2016 09:48
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InstallerUFB:

 

chevrolux:

 

pipe60:

 

Electrician should sort all the power side out. Have you considered using Cat 6A instead of Cat 6?

 

 

There is absolutely no point in Cat 6A for data.

 

And frankly there is actually no point in Cat 6 either if the use is purely for data - Cat5e is perfectly fine for 1000BASE-T. The only thing Cat6 can be good for is running things like HDMI extenders (the extra MHz Cat6 supports is used). Although then that comes to another point in that I see zero point in distributing uncompressed video  - things like the Raspberry Pi, Roku, Chromecast etc have dealt to that!

 

 

Following on - CAT6A, CAT7 cabling systems are specked/designed for cabling up core switching in Data Centres etc when you need max through put on multiple parallel cable links with near zero cross-talk not only within the cable but with other cables in close proximity - not really cost effective or practical for what you would find in a home network situation.

 

 

Which is why it seems strange that the TCF have specified Cat6A in its TCF Premises Wiring Cable Installers Guidelines for Telecommunication Services.

 

Another point to keep in mind is that there are limits on the size of the holes you should put in your house framing. Usually with standard framing, the largest size you are going to want to drill is 25mm, with holes spaced at least 100mm apart. This article in Build magazine has more detail. 


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  Reply # 1525144 3-Apr-2016 10:56
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i use cat6 for prewires as its easier to pull you can predrill top/ bottom plates and nogs with draw wire 25mm hole max other side of stud from power and a wall box at 400mm-top. mark location on plan if necessary.


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  Reply # 1525145 3-Apr-2016 10:57
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Hi,

 

 

 

A few point you might want to consider if you are doing a new build

 

Read https://www.chorus.co.nz/our-network/wiring/for-home

 

 

 

If you are putting in a cabinet to house the patch panel make it as big as you can. I have a the alarm, Phone & TV all in 1 wall cabinet in the garage & its needs to be at least twice as big !

 

Run a solid conduit from where the phone/Fibre entry point is on the outside of the house into the cabinet, there should already be a green conduit to the kerb, so from the house end of that to the cabinet

 

If you are down a shared driveway put in an extra conduit from the boundary as well !

 

Think about where you are going to put your modem, run 2 Cat 6 cables to that location so you can link to & from the patch panel

 

I have my modem siting on a shelf above the cabinet in the garage & have a power point and 2 network cables run down in to the patch panel, 1 is connected to the ONT, the other to the a small network switch

 

Think about the needs for each room, 2 network cables will do but remember these can double as phone line so maybe 3 or 4 runs to say the home office or in behind the TV would be a better Idea

 

If you are on a multi level house or just big, think about adding extra cables in to places like the ends of the halls or stairwells to support wifi repeaters to increase coverage

 

 


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  Reply # 1525302 3-Apr-2016 18:52
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Thanks everyone for the replies.

 

In terms of CAT 5e vs 6 vs 6a, most people I have spoken to have suggested CAT6 as striking a reasonable balance between performance, future proofing, cost and "WTF!? CAT6a!? That's nuts!". But I've just been comparing prices on Cables Direct (though I haven't shopped around yet and I do know a couple of people with trade accounts at the electrical wholesalers), and for shielded solid core ethernet, you're looking at more than double the price of a reel (5e ~ $160, 6 ~ $360).

 

Everything I've read seems to say that shielded is the way to go for internal cabling.

 

I certainly don't have any plans to be sending uncompressed HDMI via a balun down these cables, but was more leery about what the future may bring. I'd hate to skimp and not do it right while I had the chance.


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  Reply # 1525306 3-Apr-2016 18:56
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Cable is part of the cost - how much will compatible patch panels and terminals bump up the cost? I tend to agree that if you're doing it, do it right, but then you can gold plate a project to no benefit.

 

Work out the total cost - your labour will be the same either/or.


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  Reply # 1525308 3-Apr-2016 19:04
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And for holes in studs, a builder told me a useful rule of thumb was that the hole should be no more than a quarter of the width of the stud. Which is about 25mm for a 100mm stud.

 

But on this topic, what's the best drill bit to use. I've got 25mm spade bits (that make a mess) and hole/saw bits (that are slow and often require access to both sides). I've seen auger-style bits that are quite short (to get between the studs, I guess) but I don't know what they're called. My drills have a 13mm shanks.


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  Reply # 1525318 3-Apr-2016 19:16
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No you don't need to worry about shielded, just regular solid CAT5e or CAT6 will do just fine

 

Shielded and CAT6a is horrible stuff


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  Reply # 1525319 3-Apr-2016 19:18
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chevrolux:

 

pipe60:

 

Electrician should sort all the power side out. Have you considered using Cat 6A instead of Cat 6?

 

 

There is absolutely no point in Cat 6A for data.

 

And frankly there is actually no point in Cat 6 either if the use is purely for data - Cat5e is perfectly fine for 1000BASE-T. The only thing Cat6 can be good for is running things like HDMI extenders (the extra MHz Cat6 supports is used). Although then that comes to another point in that I see zero point in distributing uncompressed video  - things like the Raspberry Pi, Roku, Chromecast etc have dealt to that!

 

 

 

 

Given the 2500baseT is likely to come to life soon with 2500baseX hitting a rather large datacenter deployment already CAT5e life is somewhat extended.

 

 

 

Ild personally put CAT6 in where cost effective but then im also in that area where breaking over 1Gbit is a serious consideration too.

 

You have a great point on distributing compressed video, Even when your talking raw bluerays images often thats looking at 20~30Mbit for the video track and another 1~2Mbit for the full DTS audio. Even a 100mbit network can handle that with ease!

 

 

 

The biggest hit i see with CAT6 is the extra jump up in things like patch panels and connectors unless i have been looking in the wrong places Theres quite a premium there! - IMO patch panels themselves are a tad expensive for what they are though too (Directly compared to dumb switches though.)





#include <std_disclaimer>

 

Any comments made are personal opinion and do not reflect directly on the position my current or past employers may have.


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  Reply # 1525321 3-Apr-2016 19:24
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I've used auger bits, spade bits and bi-metal hole saws.

 

Bi-metal hole saws are the only one of the above that will cut thru steel such as nails. They are rather short so you'll need extensions to get a reasonable distance down your walls, assuming you're doing so with the gib in place.

 

Click to see full size

 

 


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