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  Reply # 1526378 5-Apr-2016 15:02
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Good luck with your project.  It can be great fun implementing and using (have structured wiring throughout our home (RG6 and Cat5e) including tielines to the garage with office (and it's own dedicated cabinet)... went a bit overboard :-D





Check out my LPFM Radio Station at www.thecheese.co.nz cool


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  Reply # 1526492 5-Apr-2016 19:33
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Disrespective:

 

Yeah, fair call. I don't recall if there is a master splitter at the demarcation point already, and I'm not sure I completely understand where it's supposed to be wired to be able to apply it to my situation properly. *shrug*

 

 

The ST2206 looks like a good unit. But otherwise, I understand you'd typically install the master splitter in either the ETP or your comms cabinet/cupboard. But, it can go anywhere between your ETP and your ADSL jack point (e.g. in the ceiling space or subfloor).

 

In either scenario, ideally there will only be Cat5e/6 cable and the splitter itself all the way from the ETP to the to the ADSL jack point.

 

In your case the splitter would probably be in your cabinet, hooked directly up to patch panel. The dedicated ADSL jack point would be one port of your patch panel, with a few adjacent ports for phone only.

 

 


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  Reply # 1526495 5-Apr-2016 19:43
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froob:

 

Disrespective:

 

Yeah, fair call. I don't recall if there is a master splitter at the demarcation point already, and I'm not sure I completely understand where it's supposed to be wired to be able to apply it to my situation properly. *shrug*

 

 

The ST2206 looks like a good unit. But otherwise, I understand you'd typically install the master splitter in either the ETP or your comms cabinet/cupboard. But, it can go anywhere between your ETP and your ADSL jack point (e.g. in the ceiling space or subfloor).

 

In either scenario, ideally there will only be Cat5e/6 cable and the splitter itself all the way from the ETP to the to the ADSL jack point.

 

In your case the splitter would probably be in your cabinet, hooked directly up to patch panel. The dedicated ADSL jack point would be one port of your patch panel, with a few adjacent ports for phone only.

 

 

 

 

one would hope the ST2206 is of reasonable build quality that it doesnt matter. Point would be to have an isolatable circut for testing, Which is required by the standard.

 

 

 

of the photos i have seen the loopback for the isolated point looks like it could be a little more sturdier but then i haven't physically played with one So ill leave others to comment on that.  - I'm likely to be redoing all the wiring here on one though, so i would love to be told otherwise!

 

 

 

 

i find the Two input lines part interesting too, as far as i can tell only the bottom left port is actually connected to this, With only one port it almost makes more sense to just directly wire it up to a jackpoint for a secondary connection.





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Any comments made are personal opinion and do not reflect directly on the position my current or past employers may have.


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  Reply # 1526540 5-Apr-2016 21:08
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So, from everything I've read, technically there is (almost?) no difference between T568A and B, and it doesn't actually matter what you do so long as you do it consistently.

 

But I've read a few things that T568A is the preferred standard in New Zealand - is that still correct?

 

 


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  Reply # 1526573 5-Apr-2016 21:56
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But I've read a few things that T568A is the preferred standard in New Zealand - is that still correct?

 

 

Yes, it seems to be the current position. This is from the current TCF guidelines:

 

There are two standard pin‐out options available, commonly referred to as “568A” and “568B”. The 568A option is the preferred option in Australia and New Zealand. This option should be used unless there is some specific reason why this is not practicable. Premises Owners should exercise caution when purchasing equipment (CPE) particularly from international sources as it may be wired to the 568B standard and therefore result in an incompatibility issue.

 

Whether the 568A or 568B option is used, the same option should apply throughout the installation. During later cabling additions, the installer should check the existing wiring standard at the patch‐panel before any additional TO’s are terminated.

 

To avoid problems when additions are made, where the 568B option is used, this should be clearly marked on the Home Distributor and in any user instructions or cable records.


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  Reply # 1526741 6-Apr-2016 09:55
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Next query (but still in the "doing it right" category), any recommendations as to decent network tools would be welcome.

 

I've got a Hanlong combo ethernet stripper and crimping tool that I bought on a whim from PBTech, though no idea if it does either stripping or crimping particularly well (the link says its a Dynamix brand, but it looks identical and the model numbers are the same).

 

I think, at minimum, I will need 110 punch down tool and cable tester. Depending on the cable stripping capabilities of the combo tool I already have, I may also need a better cable stripper too. Anything else required/highly recommended?

 

What should I be looking for in terms of brand? There are some on trademe that look cr@ptacular, but equally some on the dedicated networking sites that go for hundreds.

 

I am aiming for reasonable quality, but this is very much a home project; I am not doing this professionally and don't need (nor want to pay for) kit designed for 1 million+ installs. From reading around, the spring loaded punch down tools are the way to go.


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  Reply # 1527942 7-Apr-2016 20:08
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I bought a combo 110/krone punchdown tool; this one I think.

 

For cable stripping, I just use the blades on one of the cheap yellow punchdown tools like the one shown in this thread. You have to be careful not to nick the wires, but it works well enough.

 

My cable tester was bought years ago off TradeMe, and is some generic brand. It is the two unit type that tests each wire and lights up an LED if it connects. Nothing fancy.

 

I wouldn't highly recommend any of this kit, but it all works well enough.


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  Reply # 1528058 7-Apr-2016 22:47
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mdf:

 

So, from everything I've read, technically there is (almost?) no difference between T568A and B, and it doesn't actually matter what you do so long as you do it consistently.

 

But I've read a few things that T568A is the preferred standard in New Zealand - is that still correct?

 

 

 

 

As others have said, should be no difference in practice. Having said that, I've read somewhere that some of the hdmi over network cable senders work better over T568B than T568A. The reason for this was that in the B version, some of the more critical signals were sent over a pair with a higher twist ratio resulting in better rejection of noise etc. They said the distance it would work over and the B version was longer (but not by much). Sounds feasible that they would optimize the product for the biggest market.

 

 

 

Also, you should not remove the insulation from the wires before punching them down (as shown in one of the pictures above).

 

 

 

 


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  Reply # 1528258 8-Apr-2016 11:08
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dolsen:

 

 

 

Also, you should not remove the insulation from the wires before punching them down (as shown in one of the pictures above).

 

 

pictures were straight off google, from people posting on GZ.

 

 

 

i should have made a point of pointing out that while posting though.





#include <std_disclaimer>

 

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  Reply # 1540634 23-Apr-2016 13:06
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Can anyone explain the difference between:

 

 

and

 

?

 

I've been investigating faceplate options further, and I've been put off using amdex jacks. I like the look of the PDL ones better than Dynamix, but I think I need to use an adapter - one of the above.

 

For the 8P8C shaped one, I thought it would be weird to add an extra ~1mm of thickness to a jackpoint - won't this make it harder to get the cables out?

 

But for the square one, maybe you end up with an odd looking recess?


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  Reply # 1540657 23-Apr-2016 14:32
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I used the second of the two options, which just makes the jack slightly recessed. No problems at all taking cords out. Here's a photo so you can see the result:

 

Click to see full size


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  Reply # 1540847 23-Apr-2016 19:42
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mdf:

 

Can anyone explain the difference between:

 

 

 

and

 

?

 

I've been investigating faceplate options further, and I've been put off using amdex jacks. I like the look of the PDL ones better than Dynamix, but I think I need to use an adapter - one of the above.

 

For the 8P8C shaped one, I thought it would be weird to add an extra ~1mm of thickness to a jackpoint - won't this make it harder to get the cables out?

 

But for the square one, maybe you end up with an odd looking recess?

 

 

 

 

The bottom one was designed by/for PDL for use to adapt their standard face plates for use with any standard keystone jack. Keystone is not a brand but a mounting design standard specification.

 

The top one looks like someone elses attempt to do something similar. Possibly so that the face of the jack is directly presented.

 

I have used the bottom one on multiple installs (using PDL Face plates) with a variety of different manufacture's Jacks (with as many variety of pricing/quality variations) and have had no problems with fitting/removing or the use of the jacks.

 

The top ones I have never used.


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  Reply # 1540862 23-Apr-2016 20:14
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Thanks guys. Both are actually Dynamix. The top one is a FP-AVCWH "AV Keystone to PDL600 Series Compatible Modular Clip" and the second (apparently more usual one) is FP-RJCWH "RJ45 Keystone to PDL600 Series Compatible Modular Clip".

 

Having just cut and paste all that, I've now realised that the top one (the AV one) is for non RJ-45 purposes. Basic reading comprehension fail.


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  Reply # 1542272 26-Apr-2016 15:28
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So I found the comments about the ethernet to telephone thing quite interesting. How much does that device cost, I couldn't find it listed anywhere.


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  Reply # 1542360 26-Apr-2016 17:46
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Willuknight:

 

So I found the comments about the ethernet to telephone thing quite interesting. How much does that device cost, I couldn't find it listed anywhere.

 

 

can you explain or expand a little?


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