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  Reply # 1543623 28-Apr-2016 21:05
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Nothing at all wrong with overkill... but I just use one of these Dynamix double adapters


mdf



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  Reply # 1543660 28-Apr-2016 22:14
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froob:

Nothing at all wrong with overkill... but I just use one of these Dynamix double adapters



I've used these before too. You just need to be careful to check the wiring diagram to make sure it will do what you want it to. I've been caught out by this more than once.

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  Reply # 1544290 29-Apr-2016 22:19
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DarthKermit:

 

From my own experience with doing our home:

 

  • Run galved steel wires (reasonably heavy gauge) under your house to attach the network cable to. These can be run on diagonal lines to save a bit of cable length. You can easily add extra cables to the bundles this way.
  • Drill at least 25 mm holes for cable entry into your house, to allow for more cables in the future.
  • You can block up the holes with steel wool to prevent rodents getting in. The wool can be easily removed if you need to get at your cables.
  • If you're using modular face plates, go for ones with a few extra holes (and get some blank modules for the holes). This way you can add more network outlets at a later date without having to replace your face plates.
  • If you're re-gibbing a room and you're not ready to network it yet, put 25 or 32 mm conduit(s) in to future proof that room.

 

 

 

 

 

Cat6A is overkill unless you are planning to run some heavyduty gear on PoE.

 

 

 

Use catenary wire (available from electrical suppliers) to hang the cable off, but don't run diagonally. Run it along the lines of the building and branch off it to each outlet. Keep the data bundle 300mm away from the power cables where possible, and anywhere you can't avoid being closer than 50mm then just slit a bit of flexi-duct over to provide some physical separation. We block any larger floor penetrations with "greenstuff" insulation if the hole has a good amount of space leftover. You want all the holes you drill to be big enough for adding additional cables in future, so for example where you have 12 cables running through a wall you might need a 40mm hole or multiple 25mm holes. If you get tempted to leave a draw wire in the wall to pull extra cables in future, be aware that you won't be able to pull around corners inside the framing -- it pretty much only works in a straight line through the timber or through conduit if you need a bend.

 

 

 

Don't forget that you may want to get network in odd places in future, for example WIFI somewhere on the ceiling at a couple of points around the house, an outlet halfway up a wall for a TV, network for security cameras etc or other building devices ("internet of things") that might be programmed for automatic operation in future. 





Qualified in business, certified in fibre, stuck in copper, have to keep going  ^_^

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  Reply # 1544296 29-Apr-2016 22:22
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mdf:
froob:

 

Nothing at all wrong with overkill... but I just use one of these Dynamix double adapters

 


EDIT: Sorry just found the post that hadn't been quoted for context. However those double adapters are RJ45 and the round cable won't be replugged too nicely. The 4-way adapter would be better, and if you can find someone with an RJ11 crimping tool you can fix it to plug directly to the phone output of your router. Alternatively, just plug the phone output into the house wiring that Chorus should have labelled for you next to the ONT, then you can use phones at any of old BT outlets still connected around the house.





Qualified in business, certified in fibre, stuck in copper, have to keep going  ^_^

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  Reply # 1544298 29-Apr-2016 22:27
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webwat:

 

mdf:
froob:

 

Nothing at all wrong with overkill... but I just use one of these Dynamix double adapters

 



I've used these before too. You just need to be careful to check the wiring diagram to make sure it will do what you want it to. I've been caught out by this more than once.

 

Splitters are bulky and ugly, drop the speed to 100megs, and they block PoE if you happen to need an IP phone or whatever. Plan for enough cables when you build the network, and use the workarounds when you have no other choice.

 

 

That's true. But in this case, the discussion was around how to split an analogue phone signal across multiple ports, so the last two points don't apply.

 

Edit: But they are still bulky and ugly... :)


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  Reply # 1544302 29-Apr-2016 22:34
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mdf:

 

Jase2985:

 

mdf:

 

Kind of overkill, isn't it? How many internal phone jacks do you need to wire back to the router?

 

 

the ST2206 is overkill if you have fibre :)

 

the ST2210 is also cheaper than the ST2206 :)

 

 

Assuming you're using patch panels and don't need to wire directly, does the ST2210 do anything other than split one socket into four? If you don't need four wired phones, wouldn't a simple splitter do just as well?

 

 

 

 

Thats correct, although get a cabled splitter for this purpose (don't want to block ports on the back of the router) so the phone output of the router can feed any destination thats an analogue phone. And the plug will need to be RJ11, not RJ45, because the phone socket on the router is RJ11.





Qualified in business, certified in fibre, stuck in copper, have to keep going  ^_^

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  Reply # 1545033 1-May-2016 21:15
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I'm installing some ceiling mounted wireless access points (these ones).

 

I have two rooms side by side where I am aiming for maximum coverage. The two rooms are separated by a large doorway (it has a sliding door which is never closed). The "lintel" (right word?) above the doorway extends down from the ceiling approx 500mm. It's the standard 100mm gib faced interior wall. No idea if there's anything in the wall.

 

My query is how far back from the doorway is the optimal distance to install the access point. I would guess that too close to the doorway/wall/lintel and the room on the far side may be "shadowed". Too far back and you're obviously reducing the overall range (though I am sure I am _well_ within maximums).

 

No diagram sorry. Sketchup has gone awry and my one effort on Windows 10 paint must never see the light of day.


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  Reply # 1545042 1-May-2016 21:53
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My whole point was I liked the idea of not having to run a phone line and socket to each room. I was going to run paired Ethernet to each room anyway and the ST sounds like if I want one room to have a phone I can just plug one port into the phone and if I decide I don't need another phone in that room, I can plug it back into the router- much more elegant.

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  Reply # 1545043 1-May-2016 21:53
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My whole point was I liked the idea of not having to run a phone line and socket to each room. I was going to run paired Ethernet to each room anyway and the ST sounds like if I want one room to have a phone I can just plug one port into the phone and if I decide I don't need another phone in that room, I can plug it back into the router- much more elegant.

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