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Topic # 196048 17-May-2016 12:30
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Dryer "hums or buzzes" when activated but tumbler doesn't turn or begin drying cycle.

 

Opened up the rear panel and see a big lump of melted lead in one spot. Internet research suggests it may be a dead capacitor.

 

Anyone paid for a professional repair of this type recently? 

 

I could probably get a decent working used dryer for around $100.00+. I assume repair cost could be around $100.00 so probably not worth it. 


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  Reply # 1554087 17-May-2016 12:32
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At least that much to get someone out to do it and warranty it. Perhaps less if you take it in somewhere but they still have to do all the electrical safety checks etc so $60 plus.




Richard rich.ms

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  Reply # 1555873 19-May-2016 23:36
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had this problem a year or so ago in a not that old simpson (4-5 years).

 

Problem was the motor start capacitor was so smoked i couldnt read the value off it. But for $15-20 i got a generic motor start cap from the electrical wholesalers and away it went.

 

Awkward parts were getting it off the wall mount and un-mounting the cap which had been mounted to the motor and then fitted to the drier. Bit of reverse mental imagery needed to undo something blind.

 

 

 

Not hard and not technical and in the end successful and cheap.


 
 
 
 


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  Reply # 1556149 20-May-2016 11:44
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If you find what capacitor you need - give me a buz. I may have it. You do not need to spend even $15-20 for a "special" capacitor.

 

Few caps can be connected together to get the required capacitance. I've done that before with another motor-starting cap in another device. No prob.

 

 




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  Reply # 1556156 20-May-2016 11:51
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The DIY part of me thinks it would be ok to just do it myself or to get someone with the requisite skills to do it cheaply, but the legal part of me thinks that I ought to pay a certified professional to do it. I usually veer on the side of caution.

 

Thanks for all the information and help.


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  Reply # 1556173 20-May-2016 12:08
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What brand of dryer?

 

F&P has Capacitors on their parts page - here is a 8uF one: https://secure.fisherpaykel.com/nz/Catalog/ItemContent.aspx?ItemNumber=131121&CatalogId=004&CatalogDetailId=38&NSM=Y


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  Reply # 1556180 20-May-2016 12:20
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Legally you are allowed to repair your own appliances.





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  Reply # 1556185 20-May-2016 12:31
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richms:

 

Legally you are allowed to repair your own appliances.

 

 

 

 

left off a really important bit, here is the exemption clause, section (g) is the most important bit!

 

 

 

Exemption for maintenance of domestic appliances

 

 

 

80.

 

(1) The owner of any electrical appliance may do any prescribed electrical work, or assist in doing any prescribed electrical work, in relation to that appliance if—

 

 

 

(a) the appliance is kept principally for the use of that person, or any near relative of that person, or both; and

 

 

 

(b) the appliance is used principally for domestic purposes and not for commercial or industrial purposes; and

 

 

 

(c) the work is within the limits prescribed in regulations made for the purposes of this section; and

 

 

 

(d) the work is carried out in accordance with the requirements of any regulations; and

 

 

 

(e) the work is carried out in a competent and safe manner; and

 

 

 

(f) while that work is being carried out, the appliance is not connected to a power supply; and

 

 

 

(g) the work is, before connection to a power supply, tested and certified, in accordance with regulations, by a registered person who holds a current practising licence issued under this Act that authorises that person to test and certify prescribed electrical work.

 

 

 

 




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  Reply # 1556193 20-May-2016 12:39
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Yeah thanks. I don't actually know the law at all, but my gut feeling was that any electrical repair needs to be certified. 

 

I'm bit paranoid around insurance policies, and seeing how faulty wiring is a common cause of house fires and likely to be a disqualifying matter for home and contents insurance policies.


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  Reply # 1556200 20-May-2016 12:54
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gregmcc:

 

richms:

 

Legally you are allowed to repair your own appliances.

 

 

 

 

left off a really important bit, here is the exemption clause, section (g) is the most important bit!

 

 

 

Exemption for maintenance of domestic appliances

 

80.

 

(1) The owner of any electrical appliance may do any prescribed electrical work, or assist in doing any prescribed electrical work, in relation to that appliance if—

 

(a) the appliance is kept principally for the use of that person, or any near relative of that person, or both; and (b) the appliance is used principally for domestic purposes and not for commercial or industrial purposes; and (c) the work is within the limits prescribed in regulations made for the purposes of this section; and (d) the work is carried out in accordance with the requirements of any regulations; and (e) the work is carried out in a competent and safe manner; and (f) while that work is being carried out, the appliance is not connected to a power supply; and (g) the work is, before connection to a power supply, tested and certified, in accordance with regulations, by a registered person who holds a current practising licence issued under this Act that authorises that person to test and certify prescribed electrical work.

 

 

 

That's incorrect - where did that come from?

 

In general, you may work on household appliances subject to conditions that:

 

You, or a close relative, must own it.  It must be for use by you or a close relative.  It must not be for commercial or industrial use.

 

The relevant regulation (ECP 50) is here.

 

 

 

Of course you must be "competent", and having to ask about how to do something which is fairly basic in forums might be good indication that you aren't.

 

 

 

Edit:  OK I see what's happened here.

 

That "clause g" actually states:

 

"Where required by regulations made under section 169 of this Act, the work is tested and certified by a registered electrical inspector in accordance with regulations made under that section before connection to a power supply."

 

 

 

 




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  Reply # 1556227 20-May-2016 13:05
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Fred99:

 

 

 

having to ask about how to do something which is fairly basic in forums might be good indication that you aren't.

 

 

 

I wasn't asking about "how to do it". I was asking about people how had engaged professionals to do it. Re-read my first thread.


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  Reply # 1556234 20-May-2016 13:16
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Hatch:

 

Fred99:

 

 

 

having to ask about how to do something which is fairly basic in forums might be good indication that you aren't.

 

 

 

I wasn't asking about "how to do it". I was asking about people how had engaged professionals to do it. Re-read my first thread.

 

 

 

 

Sorry - that wasn't directed at you.

 

There are many past threads in this forum where people have asked for "how to" advice for restricted electrical work, and many incorrect replies based on misunderstanding of what you may or may not be allowed to do.  You are (if competent) allowed to do more than many people may expect.  However, even if competent, in different circumstances (ie a workplace or "doing a favour for a mate") you may be legally allowed to do far less than some people seem to think should be okay.


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  Reply # 1556250 20-May-2016 13:20
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Fred99:

 

gregmcc:

 

richms:

 

Legally you are allowed to repair your own appliances.

 

 

 

 

left off a really important bit, here is the exemption clause, section (g) is the most important bit!

 

 

 

Exemption for maintenance of domestic appliances

 

80.

 

(1) The owner of any electrical appliance may do any prescribed electrical work, or assist in doing any prescribed electrical work, in relation to that appliance if—

 

(a) the appliance is kept principally for the use of that person, or any near relative of that person, or both; and (b) the appliance is used principally for domestic purposes and not for commercial or industrial purposes; and (c) the work is within the limits prescribed in regulations made for the purposes of this section; and (d) the work is carried out in accordance with the requirements of any regulations; and (e) the work is carried out in a competent and safe manner; and (f) while that work is being carried out, the appliance is not connected to a power supply; and (g) the work is, before connection to a power supply, tested and certified, in accordance with regulations, by a registered person who holds a current practising licence issued under this Act that authorises that person to test and certify prescribed electrical work.

 

 

 

That's incorrect - where did that come from?

 

Section 80 of the Electricity Act 1992 (AKA "the law")

 

A good idea to follow ECP 50, (Electrical code of practice) but at the end of the day the Electricity act is what has to be followed, and should any issues arise out of home owner repairs the best defence is that it was "tested and certified by a registered person......"

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

In general, you may work on household appliances subject to conditions that:

 

You, or a close relative, must own it.  It must be for use by you or a close relative.  It must not be for commercial or industrial use.

 

The relevant regulation (ECP 50) is here.

 

 

 

Of course you must be "competent", and having to ask about how to do something which is fairly basic in forums might be good indication that you aren't.

 

 

 

Edit:  OK I see what's happened here.

 

That "clause g" actually states:

 

"Where required by regulations made under section 169 of this Act, the work is tested and certified by a registered electrical inspector in accordance with regulations made under that section before connection to a power supply."

 

 

 

 

 


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  Reply # 1556252 20-May-2016 13:24
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Hatch:

 

The DIY part of me thinks it would be ok to just do it myself or to get someone with the requisite skills to do it cheaply, but the legal part of me thinks that I ought to pay a certified professional to do it. I usually veer on the side of caution.

 

Thanks for all the information and help.

 

 

 

 

The big question is, why did it fail? was it because the dryer was been overloaded? are the bearings wearing out and causing too much friction resulting in the motor running too hot?

 

 

 

It's not a big job to replace the capacitor, but if the bearings are also worn out it most likely time to cut your losses and buy a new one, all depends on how much you want to spend fixing it


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  Reply # 1556263 20-May-2016 13:37
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gregmcc:

 

Fred99:

 

 

 

That's incorrect - where did that come from?

 

Section 80 of the Electricity Act 1992 (AKA "the law")

 

A good idea to follow ECP 50, (Electrical code of practice) but at the end of the day the Electricity act is what has to be followed, and should any issues arise out of home owner repairs the best defence is that it was "tested and certified by a registered person......"

 

 

 

 

 

 

If you refer the Electricity Act 1992, it very clearly states:

 

"Section 80: substituted, on 1 April 2010, by section 13 of the Electricity Amendment Act 2006 (2006 No 70)."

 

 

 

That repeals section 80 of the 1992 act.

 

Clause (2) in section 80 of part 9 of that 2006 act states:

 

"Subsection (1)(g) applies only if required by regulations."

 

 

 

(Actually - when I look back at the original 1992 act, that same clause was there anyway - that part hasn't even changed)

 

 

 

IOW - it's saying the same as ECP 50 (2004)

 

I do not believe your interpretation of the law is correct - implying that you may not for example legally replace an element on your toaster, or a broken plug on your hedge trimmer, without having it tested and certified by an electrical inspector before plugging it in.

 

 

 

 


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  Reply # 1556302 20-May-2016 15:05
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gregmcc:

 

The big question is, why did it fail? was it because the dryer was been overloaded? are the bearings wearing out and causing too much friction resulting in the motor running too hot?

 

It's not a big job to replace the capacitor, but if the bearings are also worn out it most likely time to cut your losses and buy a new one, all depends on how much you want to spend fixing it

 

 

Main reason of failures in modern electronics besides introduction of ROHS is: Capacitors made in China. F&P buys components in China.. Wonder if their medical products use the same component base...

 

I have recently opened about a dozen of faulty PC Power Supplies made in China - all have failed caps in them. Few cents components render expensive devices useless. Imagine Chineese planes. What are they using in them?

 

Changing bearing on the main shaft of the Washing Machine or Dryer is not a big deal. Done that. Cost me about $20 to buy a new ball bearing - you have to be very specific for the part number - last bit defines special type (to allow to expand when temperature rise)


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