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Topic # 196477 1-Jun-2016 18:42
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Garden shed is modern, galv, about 3m x 2m. Sits on concrete slabs that slope for runoff. Has a maybe 75x75 internal wood frame. Sits on geez, that black water separation thing that starts with M. Ill remember later, it comes on a roll. Bolted down with 2 bolts and a right angle. Cool shed.

 

But the black water separation stuff that I cannot recall the trade name of, is supposed to stop water seepage, it doesnt, by a long shot.

 

I need to look at ways to watertight the edges. So its not swimming inside.

 

Ideas:

 

1. Put sealer goop around the edge, but the gap between the concrete and galv is not much over 5mm, so hard to goop it and finger it smooth

 

2. Raise it 75mm and lay 75mm treated strips onto concrete and attach a timber strip floor, and just let the water run under. Concerned over warping the galv

 

as I crowbar the base. Maybe its quite light to crowbar and with the wood frame which is in the base as well be ok? Need to buy or get made another set of right angle for the bolts as it wouldn't then reach the bolts.

 

3. Raise it a smaller amount, say 5mm and pack it, to allow water run through, and make a free standing joist/plank floor. 

 

4. Raise it a small amount, say 10mm, put a 10mm treated wood foundation around the perimeter, that will allow the bolts to reach. Paint and seal that.

 

 

 

Malthoid, thats it

 

Whaddya reckon? Any other options or gotchas?


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  Reply # 1563802 1-Jun-2016 18:49
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A large umbrella:p

Seriously though you don't want it too sealed, they need to breath so wet or damp tools etc dry




Mike
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  Reply # 1563804 1-Jun-2016 18:50
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If the walls dont go down past the floor then water will come in. Is this one of those cheap kitset sheds? All I have seen have had that problem because they are made to just sit on flat ground.





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gzt

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  Reply # 1563805 1-Jun-2016 18:50
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Some photos might help to see that exact situation of the shed, cladding, flashing, etc.

The malthoid is not designed to provide water tightness. It is a moisture break to prevent rot in the bottom plate.



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  Reply # 1563812 1-Jun-2016 18:55
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  Reply # 1563813 1-Jun-2016 18:57
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richms:

 

If the walls dont go down past the floor then water will come in. Is this one of those cheap kitset sheds? All I have seen have had that problem because they are made to just sit on flat ground.

 

 

Im unclear. The shed has internal wood frame, including the perimeter. The base sits on the malthoid then the concrete. 




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  Reply # 1563815 1-Jun-2016 18:58
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gzt: Some photos might help to see that exact situation of the shed, cladding, flashing, etc.

The malthoid is not designed to provide water tightness. It is a moisture break to prevent rot in the bottom plate.

 

Exactly, silly idea. If the concrete was level, its probably almost ok, but its not. 


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  Reply # 1563816 1-Jun-2016 18:58
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Put it on a wooden platform



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  Reply # 1563831 1-Jun-2016 19:03
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blackjack17: Put it on a wooden platform

 

That certainly one option. Concerned that as I crowbar the wood edge base, it may warp, and leave a permanent kink if I go a tad too far when crowbarring up each edge.

 

I'll need to extend the bolts. There is a straight Z bracket on that the bolt attaches to. Is there such a thing as a bolt extender? I can get away with 10mm, thats where I thought lift it 10mm, and line with a 10mm wood perimeter and paint/seal that. 




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  Reply # 1563833 1-Jun-2016 19:07
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If I raised it, is that liable to kink the galv? I guess the whole thing is quite light


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  Reply # 1563835 1-Jun-2016 19:11
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If you can (and want) to raise it up and don't want to warp it, can't you just double everything up - get two crowbars, two people and do two corners at a time ?





rb99




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  Reply # 1563838 1-Jun-2016 19:18
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rb99:

 

If you can (and want) to raise it up and don't want to warp it, can't you just double everything up - get two crowbars, two people and do two corners at a time ?

 

 

Yep. I can buy another crowbar unless I can find mate with one. Im thinking to raise the front as you say with two crowbars, say 80mm, pack that and along the front in places. Run a number of 75x75 runners front to back. Raise the back 80mm, slide runners under, lower it. Nail floor planks on that. Just need to get made or make the straight Z bracket for the two or three internal concreted bolts. In ChCh so the previous owner bolted for EQ maybe.The water can run under the shed and follow. The current floor is the concrete. 


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  Reply # 1563841 1-Jun-2016 19:27
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Build a false floor or put a pallet in it maybe




Mike
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The views stated in my posts are my personal views and not that of any other organisation.

 

 Mac user, Windows curser, Chrome OS desired.

 

The great divide is the lies from both sides.

 

 


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  Reply # 1563843 1-Jun-2016 19:28
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I guess possibly having to add your own floor does complicate it a bit. No idea how strong it needs to be, guess that depends on what goes in it. Still, you obviously know a lot more about such things than I do, my DIY skills consist of painting, hammering and teaching myself new swearwords (usually a result of the hammering).





rb99




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  Reply # 1563846 1-Jun-2016 19:53
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MikeB4: Build a false floor or put a pallet in it maybe

 

Seems the best plan long term.




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  Reply # 1563848 1-Jun-2016 19:59
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rb99:

 

I guess possibly having to add your own floor does complicate it a bit. No idea how strong it needs to be, guess that depends on what goes in it. Still, you obviously know a lot more about such things than I do, my DIY skills consist of painting, hammering and teaching myself new swearwords (usually a result of the hammering).

 

 

Not at all. If I get it raised 80mm. cut 8 or 9  75 x75 runners, drop the shed down onto them. Cut some planks and nail them on as the floor. Done.Just a hassle in managing the lift


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