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andrew027
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  #1564927 3-Jun-2016 11:36
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I believe it's called a "roller latch" and any new one will allow for tension adjustment. Yours probably does as well but might not, depending on how old it is. If you bought a new one it should come with a striker plate for the opposing door, e.g.: Adjustable roller latch - Mitre 10.

 

 


 
 
 

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timmmay

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  #1565020 3-Jun-2016 13:06
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PeterQ:

 

Just get a flat screw driver and push the latch in while turning to the right, it might need a couple of turns to get it to what you want

 

 

I'll give that a go, thanks. I didn't know you could do that :)


timmmay

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  #1565021 3-Jun-2016 13:06
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andrew027:

 

I believe it's called a "roller latch" and any new one will allow for tension adjustment. Yours probably does as well but might not, depending on how old it is. If you bought a new one it should come with a striker plate for the opposing door, e.g.: Adjustable roller latch - Mitre 10.

 

 

Sounds like a good backup plan, thanks :)




mdf

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  #1565025 3-Jun-2016 13:10
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timmmay:

 

PeterQ:

 

Just get a flat screw driver and push the latch in while turning to the right, it might need a couple of turns to get it to what you want

 

 

I'll give that a go, thanks. I didn't know you could do that :)

 

 

I had some that were a little different. You had to take the mechanism out and then there was a thumb screw at the end that you could move in and out to adjust the tension. This way sounds much easier though!


gedc
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  #1565367 3-Jun-2016 19:39
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 Looking at the picture you probably won't be able to simply turn it. Generally the metal plate around it is close fitting. Broad blade screwdriver. Put it into the slot and PUSH the ball assembly back into the door so the edge of  it disappears under the metal plate. Then turn it. Do this a few times and it basically sticks out more or retracts back into the door depending upon which way to turn it. Sticking out more requires more force and grunt to open and shut so I presume you want the opposite.  Generally ( again ) many of these are a standard size fitting and its simply a case of removing the two screws, pulling it out of the doorframe and gently tapping the replacement one back into the hole.

 


Also, where it hits the frame there is generally a metal striker plate that appears missing on yours. If you buy a new one, it will likely come with that extra plate. That stops it chipping and marking the paint as you can see in your picture. However, if it's not there you'll probably need to chisel it in and that ain't easy with a jigsaw :) It's not needed as you will figure out but does help a little

 

 


timmmay

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  #1565390 3-Jun-2016 20:47
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Thanks, I'll give that a shot in the morning.


mdav056
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  #1565423 3-Jun-2016 22:03
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linw:

 

I've got a similar one and, much to my surprise, it was adjustable. Just looked at the blown up version of your pic and I wouldn't be surprised if it is the same as mine.

 

Mine is a Samson and beneath the protruding bit are instructions for altering the pressure. Yours is painted over!

 

It says to use a coin to twist the sticky out bit. 

 

Pretty confident you'll get a solution as I did.

 

 

 

 

Yup, bet this is it.  I have used a large screwdriver, pushed the stickyout bit in, and turned it around in 180 degrees clicks.  Anticlockwise probably decreases the tension.





gml




Bung
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  #1565449 4-Jun-2016 00:53
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Anticlockwise may decrease spring tension but it brings the roller further out. The roller needs to move inwards to stop it hitting the frame so early.,

wally22
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  #1565569 4-Jun-2016 10:22
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I just examined the photograph and can see the striker on the jamb for the closed door.

 

The jamb protrudes past the door and the striker doesn't come out that far, hence the grooves in the wood.

 

You could make a neat chamfer or bevel in the wood approximately the width of the striker to prevent contact with the wood before the roller contacts the striker.

 

Think of how the architrave around a door is shaped, bevelled or bullnose.

 

Look at your existing internal doors for examples.

 

Your strikers have probably been flattened to suit the non standard installation. Normally they protrude beyond the jamb by 5-10mm and have a curve in them to help the roller (catch) to operate smoothly (and quietly).

 

Correct adjustment is critical for the aforementioned smooth and quiet operation with these roller catches. If the gap between door and jamb is nominally zero, then the catch or striker require recessing about 2-4mm for optimal operation. This is because as you screw the roller in to decrease the protusion the spring is tightened and gets harder to operate.

 

 

 

Hope this helps


shrub
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  #1565582 4-Jun-2016 11:13
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just wind it in. Use a large flat blade screwdriver and push on the roller so it goes into the door then rotate to adjust.


timmmay

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  #1565725 4-Jun-2016 16:58
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I wound it in, but it's too loud still - it's super old. We looked at replacements but they all look similarly loud. I've bought a couple of magnetic catches from the hardware store so I'll just fill up the holes and fit the magnets somewhere. Thanks for all the advice, it's appreciated :)


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