Geekzone: technology news, blogs, forums
Guest
Welcome Guest.
You haven't logged in yet. If you don't have an account you can register now.


21286 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 4290

Trusted
Subscriber

Topic # 198774 21-Jul-2016 23:09
Send private message

I got a cheap dehumidifier from bunnings for the garage since it has hardiflex cladding which lets most of the moisture in it seems - this one - https://www.bunnings.co.nz/suki-dehumidifier-10l_p00222061

 

Anyway, twice now I have gone to the garage and the tank has been full to the point where it has switched off, but the dehumidifier is in a giant puddle of water that has come out from somewhere else on it.

 

Anyone had something like that happen? I suspect it is freezing up or something but dont care why, since it shouldnt be peeing water out all over the floor. If it was carpet then I would be looking at getting them to cover the cleaning costs of the wet carpet.





Richard rich.ms

Create new topic
14203 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 1825


  Reply # 1596579 21-Jul-2016 23:33
Send private message

How old is it? I would take it back. That is damn cheap for a dehumidifier, but no good if it leaks.  I suspect it has a hole somewhere in the tubing, as it would be working correctly if it is collecting water. You know when they stop working, when they stop collecting water, and need re-gassing, which is over $100 to get done.




21286 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 4290

Trusted
Subscriber

  Reply # 1596580 21-Jul-2016 23:38
Send private message

It does collect water in the bucket, and it didnt do it for 2 weeks when it was in the bathroom before I got a better one for there which is why I suspect it may be a freezing issue in the garage. If its a one off then I will take it back for a swap, if others have had them do it I will get a refund and buy the more expensive one like I got for the bathroom.





Richard rich.ms

14203 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 1825


  Reply # 1596583 21-Jul-2016 23:43
Send private message

richms:

 

It does collect water in the bucket, and it didnt do it for 2 weeks when it was in the bathroom before I got a better one for there which is why I suspect it may be a freezing issue in the garage. If its a one off then I will take it back for a swap, if others have had them do it I will get a refund and buy the more expensive one like I got for the bathroom.

 

 

 

 

I think it would be pretty poor it the garage, because they rely on the room they are in being warm. They also heat the room. So I would think the garage would be too cold to work well. But can't explain why it is leaking water unless water is condensing on the outside of the fins inside the unit. If that is the case I would stop using


1893 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 369

Subscriber

  Reply # 1596623 22-Jul-2016 07:58
Send private message

 Might also be an idea to test the bathroom one in the garage?


14049 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 2512

Trusted
Subscriber

  Reply # 1596629 22-Jul-2016 08:14
Send private message

Why not just use an extractor fan?





AWS Certified Solution Architect Professional, Sysop Administrator Associate, and Developer Associate
TOGAF certified enterprise architect
Professional photographer




21286 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 4290

Trusted
Subscriber

  Reply # 1596885 22-Jul-2016 14:46
Send private message

timmmay:

 

Why not just use an extractor fan?

 

 

Because air has to come in to replace it, and the problem is that outside is wet and muggy at this time of year because no sun gets to the ground near the garage to dry it out. Might be better when more gravel is down so its not just mud but also there is the loss of heat when using a fan vs the gains when using a dehumidifier.





Richard rich.ms

14049 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 2512

Trusted
Subscriber

  Reply # 1596897 22-Jul-2016 15:02
Send private message

Cold air is generally fairly dry because it has a lower capacity to absorb water. So while it feels wet and muggy to you, once you're just taking air without rain in it it can be quite dry. Exceptions for things like fog of course, and I could be wrong.





AWS Certified Solution Architect Professional, Sysop Administrator Associate, and Developer Associate
TOGAF certified enterprise architect
Professional photographer


12682 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 5971

Trusted

  Reply # 1596928 22-Jul-2016 15:28
Send private message

I feel it is being asked to do something beyond its capabilities. At the price it would seem to be a low capacity device. Garages will have a lot of water in them, such as poor water barriers, wet cars etc etc. I would suggest the best would be to find a way to air the garage.

 

On our garage the door has a gap at the bottom to allow air flow, unfortunately also the odd leaf will get in. We also have louver windows (grated)  that are always open a bit.





Mike
Retired IT Manager. 
The views stated in my posts are my personal views and not that of any other organisation.

 

 It's our only home, lets clean it up then...

 

Take My Advice, Pull Down Your Pants And Slide On The Ice!

 

 


929 posts

Ultimate Geek
+1 received by user: 39


  Reply # 1647962 9-Oct-2016 13:08
Send private message

 

Cold air is generally fairly dry because it has a lower capacity to absorb water. So while it feels wet and muggy to you, once you're just taking air without rain in it it can be quite dry. Exceptions for things like fog of course, and I could be wrong.

 

 

Cold air is dry in terms of absolute humidity but outdoors air is frequently very damp in New Zealand in terms of relative humidity. Relative humidity is the relevant characteristic. Very damp air needs to be heated by around 8 or 9 degrees before it has relative humidity moderate enough to prevent mould and dustmite growth and feel "dry". Most garage doors are nowhere near being airtight and let plenty of outdoors air in as do some ceiling manholes.

 

Compressor based dehumidifiers don't work very well below around 18-20 degrees and much of their humidity lowering function will be from the heat they produce instead of actual water removal especially if they lack a defrost feature. Not all but some desiccant based dehumidifiers work well at low temperatures. This model was recommended by consumer

 

http://www.goldair.co.nz/product-catalogue/heating/dehumidifiers/8l-desiccant-dehumidifer-gd330

 

I think I saw that one being sold cheaply at Placemakers last year. You want something with a targetable humidistat or else it wastes energy by over drying. 

 

 


2474 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 674


  Reply # 1647968 9-Oct-2016 13:22
Send private message

Looking at the advert, it has a 'continuous drain' feature, which you probably have on... a quick google says this is;


Almost all dehumidifiers are set up for continuous drainage. In the casing you will find an opening, a port, to which a hose can be attached. The water collected now flows out through the hose, instead of collecting in the bucket. If you look in the user's manual you will find instructions on how to fit the hose.


Obviously the water coming through the hose needs to flow into a drain or sump. The feed through the pump is by gravity alone so that drain needs to be below the outlet port in the casing. If the flow is unobstructed, and all "down-hill" the appliance drains continuously and you never have to worry about emptying the bucket again.


Because this is a gravity fed drain it is helpful to raise the unit off the floor by mounting it on wood or concrete blocks. If it can be mounted on a shelf a few feet above the floor so much the better.



21286 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 4290

Trusted
Subscriber

  Reply # 1647986 9-Oct-2016 14:20
Send private message

No, its not the drain feature, it is freezing up over the coils, and the ice is blocking the path into the bucket so when it melts from the top down it runs over the ice and into the chassis of the dehumidifier.

 

Also it will run down and go inside the float that is supposed to switch off the dehumidifier when the tank is full. When the float (which is just a bowl) fills up it sinks and it will not stop even when the bucket is totally full and overflowing. I bought that one inside and ran it in the closet which is warmer than the garage and the same thing happened. Its just crap. I figured because the larger suki I had was really good that the small one would be too. I dont even think they are made by the same people.





Richard rich.ms

416 posts

Ultimate Geek
+1 received by user: 185


  Reply # 1648009 9-Oct-2016 14:58
Send private message

Most of the refrigerant dehumidifiers (especially the cheap ones) really struggle when air temperature drops below 15 Deg C. They have issues with water sucked out of the air freezing on the coils. More expensive ones still struggle, but cope with things like defrost cycles, forcing higher fan speed etc.

 

For cold area dehumidifying a decetessent dehumidifier like this is the way to go. Power consumption is high, but (despite the low 8L per day rating) will outperform refrigerant based dehumidifiers in typical conditions (their rated capacity is based on 80% humidity in 30 Deg C temp, not something we experience in NZ).

 

I was thinking of getting one of those, running a hose from the discharge to the drain, and setting it on a time to run for say 5 hours in the small hours of the morning when power is the cheapest. (despite having a weathertight garage we still get mold on the walls)

 

 




21286 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 4290

Trusted
Subscriber

  Reply # 1648018 9-Oct-2016 15:00
Send private message

Ive put my inside one in the garage and it is working fine to keep it dry. Even when it is cold they should still pull moisture out of the air, its just there isnt much to get out of it. Ive found another crack in the cladding of the garage that is letting moisture in. As is always the case it is behind something so really looking foward to having it reclad in something that isnt the thinnest crappiest fiber cement board I have ever seen.





Richard rich.ms

Create new topic

Twitter »

Follow us to receive Twitter updates when new discussions are posted in our forums:



Follow us to receive Twitter updates when news items and blogs are posted in our frontpage:



Follow us to receive Twitter updates when tech item prices are listed in our price comparison site:





News »

The Warehouse leaps into the AI future with Google
Posted 15-Aug-2018 17:56


Targus set sights on enterprise and consumer growth in New Zealand
Posted 13-Aug-2018 13:47


Huawei to distribute nova 3i in New Zealand
Posted 9-Aug-2018 16:23


Home robot Vector to be available in New Zealand stores
Posted 9-Aug-2018 14:47


Panasonic announces new 2018 OLED TV line up
Posted 7-Aug-2018 16:38


Kordia completes first live 4K TV broadcast
Posted 1-Aug-2018 13:00


Schools get safer and smarter internet with Managed Network Upgrade
Posted 30-Jul-2018 20:01


DNC wants a safer .nz in the coming year
Posted 26-Jul-2018 16:08


Auldhouse becomes an AWS Authorised Training Delivery Partner in New Zealand
Posted 26-Jul-2018 15:55


Rakuten Kobo launches Kobo Clara HD entry level reader
Posted 26-Jul-2018 15:44


Kiwi team reaches semi-finals at the Microsoft Imagine Cup
Posted 26-Jul-2018 15:38


KidsCan App to Help Kiwi Children in Need
Posted 26-Jul-2018 15:32


FUJIFILM announces new high-performance lenses
Posted 24-Jul-2018 14:57


New FUJIFILM XF10 introduces square mode for Instagram sharing
Posted 24-Jul-2018 14:44


OPPO brings advanced technology to the smartphone market with new device
Posted 24-Jul-2018 09:20



Geekzone Live »

Try automatic live updates from Geekzone directly in your browser, without refreshing the page, with Geekzone Live now.



Are you subscribed to our RSS feed? You can download the latest headlines and summaries from our stories directly to your computer or smartphone by using a feed reader.

Alternatively, you can receive a daily email with Geekzone updates.