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Topic # 201598 26-Aug-2016 07:48
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I'm very soon to make the decision on whether to take on my mothers house or sell it on her behalf. It needs a lot of work, which I'm selling my house to finance but i know I'll fall short of what i need.

What i have recently come across is that lino before mid 1990s is likely to contain asbestos. The house is 1940s i believe, possibly 1950s. It's been renovated i guess in the 1970s but lino is at least 30 years old. The rules regarding asbestos removal were tightened a few months back, and the lino is over 10m2 but I'm unsure precisely the meterage.

The house smells like a rural church, and i get a hacking cough after only half a day there, job number one was tearing up the carpets and getting Wooden floors done.

I'm told that floor guys won't touch any Wooden floors that have had lino with asbestos content, even after removal.

Since from what I've read asbestos in lino is so prevalent in nz, and also seems to be completely unheard of amongst my friends, I wonder if any GZers have replaced lino and had issues with asbestos and floor sanding? Any idea on additional cost to handle it? And since I've created the topic, a ball park figure on getting a small 2 bedroom 80m2 house carpets removed and wooden floors polished up?

I guess though before April (?) this year it wasn't as big of an issue.

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  Reply # 1617665 26-Aug-2016 08:37
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For what it's worth, I had an estimate of $750 to sand a 4.7m2 bathroom after I had already removed the vinyl from the floor.

 

I ended up hiring the floor sander and doing it myself, but in retrospect I wouldn't do this again, and certainly not for the rest of the house (ymmv).

 

As for asbestos, you need to call around for quotes. Some areas of the country have free asbestos testing which would be worthwhile doing so you know where you stand before getting quotes.


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  Reply # 1617672 26-Aug-2016 08:56
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Lino shop I spoke to said they often just lay over old lino that could have aesbestos.  They lay and nail super thin ply to ensure the surface is flat and smooth, then lay lino over the top.  Total added height I believe was less than 1cm, so no worse than tiles.


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  Reply # 1617676 26-Aug-2016 09:05
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sxz:

 

Lino shop I spoke to said they often just lay over old lino that could have aesbestos.  They lay and nail super thin ply to ensure the surface is flat and smooth, then lay lino over the top.  Total added height I believe was less than 1cm, so no worse than tiles.

 

Yep, can confirm. I've had to remove three layers of lino before getting down to the boards. Removing all those staple nails was the single worst job i've done for a while.


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  Reply # 1617701 26-Aug-2016 09:28
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Hiding the problem is such a bulls#!t idea!

At some point someone is going to either try to pull it up or drill a hole, then you're putting them at risk.
I'd LOVE to see some legislation to ban these types of methods.




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  Reply # 1617719 26-Aug-2016 10:02
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Get it tested not all pre 1990's lino has asbestos





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  Reply # 1617722 26-Aug-2016 10:05
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The laws around this changed earlier this year. http://www.business.govt.nz/worksafe/information-guidance/guidance-by-hazard-type/asbestos

 

Removal of any hazard is always better than covering it over however at the moment your removal cost will now have additional monitoring of anything up to $1500 or more on top (subject to which company is used for the post work 4 stage clearance). The removal company itself will now not be the biggest bill.


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  Reply # 1617793 26-Aug-2016 11:52
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Yes, get it tested so you know if you actually have an expensive problem.

 

If you have got asbestos then the regulations, which you should read, are onerous, e.g. until it is removed by a registered remover than nobody should be entering the house unless you seal off that room.

 

 


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  Reply # 1617833 26-Aug-2016 12:41
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FWIW, I had two quotes from the same place to install new lino in our kitchen under renovation. Second one I advised that the builder has said its not of the asbestos type and the cost was cheaper despite being a superior and more expensive product. I think the flooring places just presume all old lino is asbestos and quote accordingly.

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  Reply # 1617879 26-Aug-2016 13:58
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Isn't asbestos OK unless you disturb it?

 

I.e. presence of asbestos securely contained within materials doesn't require evacuation of the house.  But if you interfere with it, then all the regs kick in?





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  Reply # 1618592 28-Aug-2016 08:55
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Pretty sure I'd just remove it and sand the floor myself. It's not like the asbestos that's ingrained in the limo is likely to suddenly come loose and float all around the room to be breathed and it is only when loose fibres are breathed that ANY (potential) issue arises.

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  Reply # 1618611 28-Aug-2016 09:34
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PhantomNVD: Pretty sure I'd just remove it and sand the floor myself. It's not like the asbestos that's ingrained in the limo is likely to suddenly come loose and float all around the room to be breathed and it is only when loose fibres are breathed that ANY (potential) issue arises.

 

When you are sanding is PRECISELY when asbestos (if present) will become airborne.

 

Wear a proper mask and protective clothing. If you are power sanding a floor you should do this anyway, with or without asbestos.

 

Remember that inhaled asbestos takes several decades to kill you - it doesn't cause any immediate symptoms (which is what makes it so dangerous).





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  Reply # 1618641 28-Aug-2016 11:15
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As other's have said, a job for the pros.

 

I am not a builder but have friends that are. The common consensus among them (although bearing in mind that most of them are only stetsons and spurs removed from total cowboys) is that asbestos isn't _quite_ as scary as its made out to be. The vast majority of mesothelioma cases are due to repeated exposures, either from working in or living near asbestos mines/factories, or living with an asbestos mine/factory worker. It's the fibers that are bad for you, and undisturbed asbestos is stable. So having undisturbed asbestos somewhere in your house probably isn't going to strike you down the second you walk through the door. There are more than a few schools with significant amounts of asbestos.

 

But, at some stage someone is going to have to bite the bullet and get rid of the stuff, whether you or a subsequent purchaser. And asbestos being present is likely to significantly lower the sale price.

 

Clearly removing the stuff has a significant risk of creating fibers. The precautions for specialist removal workers aren't as significant as I expected though (disposable masks and overalls and making sure everything is swept up into plastic bags, basically). Still, I wouldn't be trying it myself. Your situation is pretty common and the right professional can probably give you a range of options to consider.

 

But I wouldn't be sanding floors myself either. Even if there wasn't asbestos present. I like DIY, but there are some things that have a real art to them, and floor sanding is one. Do it wrong and you will get waves (google "floor sanding waves" for examples).


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  Reply # 1618658 28-Aug-2016 12:35
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PhantomNVD: Pretty sure I'd just remove it and sand the floor myself. It's not like the asbestos that's ingrained in the limo is likely to suddenly come loose and float all around the room to be breathed and it is only when loose fibres are breathed that ANY (potential) issue arises.


When it is your problem it becomes a "big expensive deal", when it is the Government's as in the sloppy approach to the Christchurch rebuild it gets dismissed " Trust us it will be OK"



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  Reply # 1618870 28-Aug-2016 20:48
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I read while looking into this, in New Zealand one person dies every two (2) days from asbestos exposure.

Unless I'm any month/year now about to be struck down, i probably had a lucky escape with asbestos - playing with the fluffy fibrous white stuff inside ancient night store heaters as a teen.

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  Reply # 1618915 28-Aug-2016 22:08
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Geese: I read while looking into this, in New Zealand one person dies every two (2) days from asbestos exposure.

Unless I'm any month/year now about to be struck down, i probably had a lucky escape with asbestos - playing with the fluffy fibrous white stuff inside ancient night store heaters as a teen.

 

 

Mesothelioma notifications in NZ, 1954-2010 - it's not a pretty picture.

 

Unknown is the other lung cancers attributed to asbestos exposure, it's suggested that could be double the cases of mesothelioma.  One factor blurring this is synergistic effect of smoking and asbestos exposure, a smoker exposed to asbestos has a much higher (double to perhaps 15 times) chance of contacting mesothelioma than a non-smoker exposed to asbestos, a non smoker exposed to asbestos has a much higher chance of contracting other lung cancers.  There is a small background of mesothelioma not attributable to asbestos exposure.

 

Absolutely disgusting given that a clear link with asbestosis and mesothelioma had been known for many decades.

 

 

 

 

 

 


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