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  Reply # 1618916 28-Aug-2016 22:19
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Fred99:

 

Mesothelioma notifications in NZ, 1954-2010 - it's not a pretty picture.

 

<snip>

 

Absolutely disgusting given that a clear link with asbestosis and mesothelioma had been known for many decades.

 

 

 

The association between asbestos and mesothelioma was firmly established by the early 1960s.

 





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  Reply # 1618922 28-Aug-2016 23:13
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I know someone who got it after working as a plumber for many years. IMHO covering up asbestos shouldn't be permitted. Although there are stories in the media that it was common after the Christchurch earthquakes. It is continued exposure that is the problem, as it builds up, as the body can't remove it.  I wouldn't be surprised if there were building products used today that were almost as bad You see warnings on them in the fineprint that they can be dangerous if breathed in.


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  Reply # 1618948 29-Aug-2016 08:14
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As above, it's an issue if airborne.  Sanding a floor is 100% in the zone to be concerned about, as is drilling/grinding/sanding or cracking sheets during disposal/demolition etc. 

 

Covering with new lino is a viable option, often they'll do a skim coat of filler if the lino below is embossed.  This effectively seals it in, so isn't completely hiding the issue.  If you're looking to make the house look prettier before selling, then that's the most cost effective approach.  Wooden floors can look nice, but aren't as appealing these days as people want more warm/energy efficient homes, so less return from an investment perspective (and a heap of hard work for someone).


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  Reply # 1619212 29-Aug-2016 16:38
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Jaxson:

 

As above, it's an issue if airborne.  Sanding a floor is 100% in the zone to be concerned about, as is drilling/grinding/sanding or cracking sheets during disposal/demolition etc. 

 

Covering with new lino is a viable option, often they'll do a skim coat of filler if the lino below is embossed.  This effectively seals it in, so isn't completely hiding the issue.  If you're looking to make the house look prettier before selling, then that's the most cost effective approach.  Wooden floors can look nice, but aren't as appealing these days as people want more warm/energy efficient homes, so less return from an investment perspective (and a heap of hard work for someone).

 

 

 

 

Although most agents now, at least the good ones, require you to sign a disclosure form, and on it you would need to put whether there is known issues, such as asbestos on the property. So potentially just putting a lay over it potentially could affect what people will offer for your house. Not disclosing it, when you have done work on it could create a big headache for everyone involved. IMO it is best to be get rid of it, if you need to do work on it, and not cover it over. Especially with something like Asbestos, where regulations are only going to get tougher.

 

I often find it ironic when I hear a builder who says that it's risk is exaggerated, and they have been handling it for years without any problems. But they often aren't the most healthy looking people, and sometimes they are smokers. Also the problems don't take effect until 30-40 years after the exposure.

 

 


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  Reply # 1619232 29-Aug-2016 17:12
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mattwnz:

 

you would need to put whether there is known issues, such as asbestos on the property.

 

 

 

 

If you don't test, you don't know.


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  Reply # 1619907 30-Aug-2016 20:56
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 The asbestos is in the lino's backing, so removing it is when you would have the risk of exposure.





Qualified in business, certified in fibre, stuck in copper, have to keep going  ^_^

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