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mdf



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Topic # 201645 28-Aug-2016 13:55
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We got a new washing machine this weekend. Exciting times in our house!

 

Like the last washing machine, the instructions for this one suggest/insist that we turn off the water supply tap between washes. This didn't happen for the last washing machine, with no (obvious) ill-effects.

 

Preliminary query - does anyone actually do this?

 

Main query - would it be possible to insert some kind of "relay valve" on the cold tap that would turn itself off and on when the washing machine is turned off and on? There is probably an approved term for a relay valve but I don't know what it is.


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  Reply # 1618712 28-Aug-2016 14:44
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Geez. What model is it? Does it not have back flow protection built in or something?

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  Reply # 1618714 28-Aug-2016 14:50
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Could be covering there behinds? Personally I'd risk it, unless it was a particularly cheap and nasty build.

European machines usually have a 'box' on the intake pipe that does exactly what you are suggesting, with a solenoid valve inside. That end of things wouldn't be hard, but finding a suitable control signal from the washing machine could be challenging.

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  Reply # 1618715 28-Aug-2016 14:51
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the correct term is a solenoid of witch it already has one for both the hot and the cold otherwise it would not be able to turn it off as required!

 

as for turning off the taps when not in use my guess is it is more of a precaution than anything else just in case something fails.... (not something I bother to do)





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mdf



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  Reply # 1618722 28-Aug-2016 15:05
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Yeah, I'm 99% sure it's butt covering but just thought I'd check. Google seems to show it's a common recommendation for most washing machines. Most point to "washing machine hoses may break/split and if that happens it might flood". 

 

The current one is an Ariston, the previous ones were Whirlpool and Samsung and they all had the same instruction. The one time I did turn the tap off all that happened was I forgot to turn it back on the next time I tried to do a wash.

 

Cheers for the thoughts. Always on the look out for a new project I can spend loads of time researching and loads of money buying the parts for, then get about halfway through, put it on hold and then relegate it to a shelf in the garage.


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  Reply # 1618918 28-Aug-2016 22:48
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We shut off the water to the washing machine / dish washer when we leave for any considerable length of time - we used to switch them off all the time, but now we are too lazy :-)

 

The main reason is if the hose or connectors bursts and leaks/sprays water all over the laundry ... (which can be very expensive if left for more than a week ...)

 

You can get flood valves (that's the name iirc - a plumber / plumbing outlet would point you in the right direction), which detect a faster flow of water than normal and cut the flow of the water.

 

Our dishwasher and washing machine are connected to only the cold, and both are connected via a Y connection - I've been advised that a flood value would be no good due to water consumption would most likely be more than the threshold as we run the washing machine and dishwasher at the same time.

 

Other things to consider are getting braided hoses with metal attachments on the end - these will assist in ensuring no failures.  The other advice was to keep an eye on the pipes and consider replacing them after a few years (I forget the time span, 8 years?  10 years?)

 

I understand that the hoses will degrade faster with hot water through them. 

 

Hope that helps!


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  Reply # 1618926 28-Aug-2016 23:40
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nickb800: Could be covering there behinds? Personally I'd risk it, unless it was a particularly cheap and nasty build.

European machines usually have a 'box' on the intake pipe that does exactly what you are suggesting, with a solenoid valve inside. That end of things wouldn't be hard, but finding a suitable control signal from the washing machine could be challenging.


It doesn't have to be an electrical solenoid. Some inlet hoses are twin walled, if the inner hose leaks water in the outer hose causes the valve at the tap end to shut off.

In 40 years I've had 1 washing machine hose leak from a faulty crimp. 1 polybutylene flexible hose to a basin mixer leak and 1 dishwasher outlet hose break. An aqua stop style inlet hose won't stop every flood.

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