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  Reply # 1638629 22-Sep-2016 10:32
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You probably need mechanical extraction. Have a look here for the type we have, I'm sure I posted the make / model somewhere. This was supplied through a bathroom firm when they redid the bathroom, you can't buy them at hardware stores. It's two speed, on low steam never builds up, on high it can change all the air in the bathroom in no time at all. The models in hardware stores, with lights and such, probably have 10% the airflow of this thing.

 

Shower Dome will prevent condensation getting out, but there's still moisture in your shower, but it's designed to take it. I chose extraction over containment.





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  Reply # 1638673 22-Sep-2016 11:24
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timmmay:

 

You probably need mechanical extraction. Have a look here for the type we have, I'm sure I posted the make / model somewhere. This was supplied through a bathroom firm when they redid the bathroom, you can't buy them at hardware stores. It's two speed, on low steam never builds up, on high it can change all the air in the bathroom in no time at all. The models in hardware stores, with lights and such, probably have 10% the airflow of this thing.

 

Shower Dome will prevent condensation getting out, but there's still moisture in your shower, but it's designed to take it. I chose extraction over containment.

 

 

I can attest that while a shower dome does work (somewhat) I think the advantage is outweighed by the fact that the shower enclosure is permanently wet or at least damp as a result. It never dries out in there and it means I have a rampant mould problem inside the shower - I have to spray exit mould on it at least once a week and scrub the stuff off, otherwise the entire inside of the shower turns into a pink moudly mess. The shower at my old house did not have a dome, and I only had to clean it around once every 2 or 3 months (based on one person showering once per day).

 

Even though I have the dome at my current house, I still use the extractor fan while showering, and I leave the fan running for at least 10 minutes afterwards.

 

I think even a budget extractor fan is better than none at all, but you must have a source of replacement air (such as a window slightly open or a grate in the bathroom door) otherwise you are wasting your time. I installed Weiss fans in all my rental properties which seem to work well. I got them wired into the light switch with timers to leave them on for around 10 mins after the light is turned off. The fans themselves are really not that hard to install but I think a sparky does have to connect them to power.


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  Reply # 1638716 22-Sep-2016 12:27
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Wheelbarrow01:

 

I can attest that while a shower dome does work (somewhat) I think the advantage is outweighed by the fact that the shower enclosure is permanently wet or at least damp as a result.

 

All showerdome installers/manufacturers recommend leaving the door ajar after your shower to allow air to dry the enclosure. I realise that this moisture eventually ends up in the room anyway, but we used a shower dome for 7 years before moving and fully recommend them to anyone whose existing mechanical ventilation is not up to the task. Leaving the door ajar after our showers always ensured the shower was dry by evening, and we never needed to clean it more than a regular once a week clean, which we would do regardless of the shower dome presence.


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  Reply # 1638741 22-Sep-2016 13:20
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Disrespective:

 

Wheelbarrow01:

 

I can attest that while a shower dome does work (somewhat) I think the advantage is outweighed by the fact that the shower enclosure is permanently wet or at least damp as a result.

 

All showerdome installers/manufacturers recommend leaving the door ajar after your shower to allow air to dry the enclosure. I realise that this moisture eventually ends up in the room anyway, but we used a shower dome for 7 years before moving and fully recommend them to anyone whose existing mechanical ventilation is not up to the task. Leaving the door ajar after our showers always ensured the shower was dry by evening, and we never needed to clean it more than a regular once a week clean, which we would do regardless of the shower dome presence.

 

 

I can agree with this as well. If i ever move again, I will be installing another ShowerDome.  Works so well to reduce the amount of condensation in the bathroom!  I also have an extractor fan to remove the steam that does escape the shower and I use Shower Witch every couple of days which helps keep the shower clean as well.

 

As for the bathroom reno, I have recently completed doing the toilet, laundry, back door and bathroom and the DIY side of it is easy!

 

I removed all the features in the room, ripped out the old GIB (that is "fun") and tidied the room up.

 

I then insulated, GIB'ed and GIB stopped the room and installed tile board and painted waterproofing on the floor and sealed the floor-wall joins as well.  The process can seem daunting but it is doable as long as you are patient and don't mind a bit of hard work.

 

To re-do our bathroom, I think the total cost included all the GIB etc came to around $4500.  This included a new bath, vanity, mirror, heated towel rails, and shower door.  I left the existing alcove shower in place as it was reasonably new.  I got a tiler in to do the tiles and his cost is in the total as well. 

 

Have a read over the building regulations, you will be surprised at how much you can do yourself, especially if it is like for like (eg replace lightswitch, replace bath/vanity without moving pipes)

 

 


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  Reply # 1638743 22-Sep-2016 13:25
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Waterproofing layers need to be inspected by the council to get building consent, before anything goes on top of them. THIS IS IMPORTANT. If you don't you'll have an unconsented bathroom that you have to declare when you sell the house, which could make the sale more difficult or reduce your sale price. Ask me how I know...





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  Reply # 1638797 22-Sep-2016 15:13
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Geese: I should add I'm installing infinity gas, and the existing water pressure here is low, so I'm replacing the shower because I'm worried once the water pressure increases it'll blow the whole thing apart.



Also the whole idea of corner shower with dome is that currently even with windows wide open, after a 10 minute shower, the room is drenched, there isn't enough air flow to get the stream outside and leaves the room wet like you wouldn't believe.


Now you tell us ...
You might have to replumb your house as your hot water piping might not be rated for mains pressure.




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  Reply # 1638800 22-Sep-2016 15:18
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timmmay:

 

Waterproofing layers need to be inspected by the council to get building consent, before anything goes on top of them. THIS IS IMPORTANT. If you don't you'll have an unconsented bathroom that you have to declare when you sell the house, which could make the sale more difficult or reduce your sale price. Ask me how I know...

 

 

You managed to screw someone down on price because they had dared to not let council meddle in how they operated their own property?





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  Reply # 1638803 22-Sep-2016 15:19
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timmmay:

 

Waterproofing layers need to be inspected by the council to get building consent, before anything goes on top of them. THIS IS IMPORTANT. If you don't you'll have an unconsented bathroom that you have to declare when you sell the house, which could make the sale more difficult or reduce your sale price. Ask me how I know...

 

 

While this may be the case with some council's, it is not always needed.

 

The guidelines that are put forward by the MBIE can be interpreted in multiple different ways.  And thus has created a "grey area" for anyone trying to work this out on their own. 

 

As ALWAYS check with your local council to confirm the requirement for consent when it comes to renovations.

 

In regards to a shower, only a "wet area" shower required a building consent in my case, but as the shower was a plastic lined shower box, no consent was required.

 

-EDIT-

 

Here is the exemption list:

 

http://www.legislation.govt.nz/act/public/2004/0072/latest/DLM5770963.html


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  Reply # 1638814 22-Sep-2016 15:33
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richms:

 

 

 

You managed to screw someone down on price because they had dared to not let council meddle in how they operated their own property?

 

 

No, our Licensed Building Practitioner project manager for a prominent bathroom firm in Wellington failed to get necessary building consents, and we only found out after the project had been complete for a year. Because of that there will be implications when selling the house.





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  Reply # 1638879 22-Sep-2016 16:59
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joker97: Now you tell us ...
You might have to replumb your house as your hot water piping might not be rated for mains pressure.


That was part of the gas fitting quote, and is pocket change really to get done. Perhaps because the 3 rooms with hot water are all in a row, and very small.



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  Reply # 1638882 22-Sep-2016 17:05
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jaymz:

As ALWAYS check with your local council to confirm the requirement for consent when it comes to renovations.


In regards to a shower, only a "wet area" shower required a building consent in my case, but as the shower was a plastic lined shower box, no consent was required.



I called our council. Was told only wet floor showers would need consent. He said everything on my quote was tickety-boo, except installing wall insulation. That requires a building consent... he then said that then means the building code most be followed to the letter, which may require new safety glass windows, etc. Don't put in the insulation = no problem.

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  Reply # 1638987 22-Sep-2016 20:32
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I know nothing about building regulations...
Is it compulsory for the pink batts to be installed when opening up (exterior) walls?

 

As you would have been told by the council, the short answer is no. But, if you do install insulation in an exterior wall (or a firewall), it will need building consent. That applies unless there is a general exemption from your council, or they grant you a specific exemption. 

 

The slightly longer answer is that it is complex, and depends on the building work you are doing. The building work you are carrying out has to comply with the buidling code, and it also must not reduce the compliance of the rest of the building. So, if your building work is going to reduce the overall thermal performance of the building, you may need to do something to counteract that, like installing some extra insulation as part of your work. There is a bit more information on this here and here.

 

It seems unlikely that insulation would be required for the work you are proposing, which I think your council has confirmed, but might be a good idea while you have the opportunity. 

 

Pricing-wise, we had a new acrylic shower, towel rail and vent installed for about $5-6k a few years ago. It involved relining the section of wall behind the shower, but very few changes to the plumbing. I also did the painting myself.


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  Reply # 1639905 24-Sep-2016 16:10
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So they've now regulated UPgrading your thermal insulation too *shake*

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  Reply # 1639919 24-Sep-2016 16:42
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PhantomNVD: So they've now regulated UPgrading your thermal insulation too *shake*

 

Yes, because adding insulation to a weatherboard house with minor water tracking thru the wood or similar with a slightly porous fiber cement cladding without putting in a barrier will lead to it becoming a sponge and rotting out.





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  Reply # 1639922 24-Sep-2016 16:54
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jnimmo:

 

All building work carried out must comply with the building code - so it is my understanding if you were removing wall linings you'd need to put in batts (if external wall) - but a bag of batts is less than $150.

 

Pulling out the bath and putting in a corner shower is probably quite good if you never use the bath, then you can use a shower dome etc which is great.. although guess would cost more to do as you'd have to replace the gib there too.

 

 

 

 

But if they are putting in batts into the external walls, then they will likely need a building consent with the council, as potentially it can affect the cladding and weather tightness.

 

 

 

The big problem with these domes is cleaning above them, as they can develop a layer of dust and dirt over time. Most people will need a ladder to do this. I really wonder why shower manufactuers don't create their own, which you can easily open like a hatch to clean the top.


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