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  Reply # 1640942 26-Sep-2016 21:47
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Imho when comes to steak you need the pan HOT so you can get a nice caramelized crust and every non-stick pan I've ever had including circulon and scanpan state they shouldn't be heated to high temperature (which makes sense given the coatings) there for not so good for steak. I use the circulon for most other frying and its pretty good although the scanpans have lasted really well too.






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  Reply # 1641059 27-Sep-2016 09:03
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Question, somewhat unrelated. How much power does induction use compared to other electric cooking methods?

 

 


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  Reply # 1641063 27-Sep-2016 09:13
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ratsun81:

 

We use Woll cookware on our induction cooktop. Cant recommend them more. Bought them at last years home show.

 

Ive got a Wok, 3 saucepans and a regular Frypan. The larger pots came with their own silicone Colander/steamer. 

 

 

 

Brilliant to use, easy to clean. High quality gear. But pricey...

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ha, the so called titanium nonstick that lasts forever?  Well it doesn't, even if you follow the care instructions!

 

Does last longer than teflon, but our woll nonstick wore off. It is a good pan even without nonstick , but not worth the money you pay.   The sales people and marketing is deceptive. 


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  Reply # 1641065 27-Sep-2016 09:22
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MikeAqua:

 

I'm interested to hear what pans, griddles etc people with induction cook tops have found best to cook steak on.

 

 

I have induction, and find a basic cast iron frypan is great for cooking steaks.   

 

The only issue I've had is that if I am cooking for a long time, the heat transfers from the cast iron pan to the induction cooktop .... cast iron gets really hot and so does the cooktop if you are cooking for a while....  this causes the induction heat protection circuitry to cut the power.   However, this has only happened once or twice , and i appreciate the safety aspect. 

 

 


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  Reply # 1641083 27-Sep-2016 09:51
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surfisup1000:

 

ratsun81:

 

We use Woll cookware on our induction cooktop. Cant recommend them more. Bought them at last years home show.

 

Ive got a Wok, 3 saucepans and a regular Frypan. The larger pots came with their own silicone Colander/steamer. 

 

 

 

Brilliant to use, easy to clean. High quality gear. But pricey...

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ha, the so called titanium nonstick that lasts forever?  Well it doesn't, even if you follow the care instructions!

 

Does last longer than teflon, but our woll nonstick wore off. It is a good pan even without nonstick , but not worth the money you pay.   The sales people and marketing is deceptive. 

 

 

 

 

What about warranty, these have a long warranty period on the surface?

 

 





 

 

 

 

 


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  Reply # 1641087 27-Sep-2016 10:00
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networkn:

Question, somewhat unrelated. How much power does induction use compared to other electric cooking methods?


 



I've got a F&P one that each element will drag 3.2KW when on power boost

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  Reply # 1641091 27-Sep-2016 10:03
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ratsun81:

 

surfisup1000:

 

ratsun81:

 

We use Woll cookware on our induction cooktop. Cant recommend them more. Bought them at last years home show.

 

Ive got a Wok, 3 saucepans and a regular Frypan. The larger pots came with their own silicone Colander/steamer. 

 

 

 

Brilliant to use, easy to clean. High quality gear. But pricey...

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ha, the so called titanium nonstick that lasts forever?  Well it doesn't, even if you follow the care instructions!

 

Does last longer than teflon, but our woll nonstick wore off. It is a good pan even without nonstick , but not worth the money you pay.   The sales people and marketing is deceptive. 

 

 

 

 

What about warranty, these have a long warranty period on the surface?

 

 

 

 

Will have to dig out the receipt and check it out.   Might be worth pursuing as they cost so much.   But, I'm guessing they will say i didn't care for it.   Basically, once it lost the nonstick surface we stopped treating it so well (never on high heat, always wiped after use etc). 

 

 

 

 


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  Reply # 1641116 27-Sep-2016 10:38
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networkn:

 

Question, somewhat unrelated. How much power does induction use compared to other electric cooking methods?

 

 

Since it's heating the pan directly, not an element that heats the pan, I expect it will use less power overall. It will still use a fair bit of power when it's on high.





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  Reply # 1641122 27-Sep-2016 10:47
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timmmay:

 

networkn:

 

Question, somewhat unrelated. How much power does induction use compared to other electric cooking methods?

 

 

Since it's heating the pan directly, not an element that heats the pan, I expect it will use less power overall. It will still use a fair bit of power when it's on high.

 

 

Somewhat related to your somewhat unrelated question - How dose a wok perform on induction? I'd guess not very well because there is only a small amount of surface area in the field (as opposed to flames licking up the sides with gas).

 

 





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  Reply # 1641129 27-Sep-2016 10:53
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mcraenz:

 

Somewhat related to your somewhat unrelated question - How dose a wok perform on induction? I'd guess not very well because there is only a small amount of surface area in the field (as opposed to flames licking up the sides with gas).

 

 

 

Woks don't work on induction.


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  Reply # 1641173 27-Sep-2016 11:26
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Stevens had half price Circulon when I was there on Saturday; picked up a new Circulon Elite frying pan for the induction top. Won't be using it for steak though as non-stick shouldn't be heated to a high heat.

 

I've got a Lodge cast iron pan which is great for steak. Last year I got a Scanpan grill pan, but because it is non-stick I'm reluctant to bring it up hot enough to do the steak well, although use it occasionally..

 

Possible to get woks for induction they would just be a bit different shape (and a lot more metal involved) https://www.amazon.co.uk/Circulon-Infinite-Anodised-Covered-Stirfry/dp/B001ELKCS4

 

I think there was even one at Stevens half price


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  Reply # 1641206 27-Sep-2016 12:04
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networkn:

 

Question, somewhat unrelated. How much power does induction use compared to other electric cooking methods?

 

 

Somebody gave me induction (one section table top) to play with. I've dismantled it to have a look inside, found schematics online - nothing extraordinary electronic-wise.

 

Measured electro magnetic field - quite high and unsafe for people with pacemakers etc.

 

Measured consumption in all settings - 1kWh at mimium settings (e.g. boiling water was very fast) 1.8 to 2kWh in max (frying).

 

It is faster to boil water than on usual or even ceramic electric cooktop. But I have not conducted (& not planning to do) comparative tests for overal power usage for cooking same food on induction vs ceramic type.

 

Will keep it as emergency cooktop to be powered from one of my inverters in case of outage... Pretty sure any metal tool from my workshop could be used to make scrabled eggs on that induction device,  e.g. even a saw :-)

 

 


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  Reply # 1643106 30-Sep-2016 08:46
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From a recent NZ Consumer Report:

 

We knew induction cooking was fast – but to see just how fast, we boiled 1 litre of water on 3 cooktops: induction, radiant-ceramic and gas.

 

The induction cooktop was at least 3 times faster at boiling water than the radiant-ceramic or gas models.

 

Approximate time to boil 1 litre of water:

 

  • Induction: 2 minutes
  • Radiant-ceramic: 6 minutes
  • Gas: 8 minutes

and:

 

The sales talk highlights induction cooktops’ efficiency and cost savings – but when we compared them with a ceramic cooktop they weren’t any cheaper to run over the same period of time.

 

Because it boils water in seconds, an induction cooktop may save a little energy. But the purchase price is high. And if you don’t have suitable cookware there’s the added expense of new pots and pans.


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  Reply # 1643117 30-Sep-2016 09:08
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I've used circulon for a few years, but I like to cook everything really hot, so the surface is done within a couple of years. Everything sticks to it now. I've decided nothing non-stick will last, so I just buy Tefal frying pans from briscoes when they're 50% off, use them until they fail, toss them out and buy a new one. This model claims to have a surface that lasts longer, but I have one called platinum or something. These pans with super non-stick coatings aren't so good for things like steak, there's no browning as such, circulon are better for that.

 

Even circulon aren't that expensive on sale, so just buy 'em, cook 'em hot, and replace when needed.

 

I'd try cast iron or something but I suspect everything would stick to that.





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  Reply # 1643153 30-Sep-2016 10:07
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timmmay:

 

I'd try cast iron or something but I suspect everything would stick to that.

 

 

Well maintained cast iron does not stick.   Keep it oiled etc.   A friend of mine who loves cooking reckons his cast iron pan is great for frying eggs even. 


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