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  Reply # 1645936 5-Oct-2016 14:11
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richms:

 

I still find the whole idea they are called consents or permits to be disgusting. Having to ask permission to build on your own land is BS.

 

I get that. I really do. But it's an insurance thing i'm sure. Liability needs to land somewhere when someone gets hurt. Especially if the property has been on-sold many times. With the Act in place, there is at least some lines drawn in the sand. That being said, designers/builders liability doesn't last for the life of a building anyway, so *shrug*


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  Reply # 1645957 5-Oct-2016 14:46
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Disrespective:

 

richms:

 

I still find the whole idea they are called consents or permits to be disgusting. Having to ask permission to build on your own land is BS.

 

I get that. I really do. But it's an insurance thing i'm sure. Liability needs to land somewhere when someone gets hurt. Especially if the property has been on-sold many times. With the Act in place, there is at least some lines drawn in the sand. That being said, designers/builders liability doesn't last for the life of a building anyway, so *shrug*

 

 

 

 

It is almost certainly about liability. If we went about saying that what you do on your own property is upto the owner, then the owner would be liable for anything that occurs on that property. Say the house develops leaky building issues, or someone is injuries by a structural failure, then the owner would be the one liable. So the best way to think of it is as an insurance policy.

 

There does appear to be been a relaxing of the rules around consents, and interpretations seem to have changed that, where less work is requiring consents.


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  Reply # 1645961 5-Oct-2016 14:49
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Disrespective:

 

You simply need to be more aware that work done prior to 1992 wasn't necessarily (probably wasn't) done to a standard that would match what is required of the laws today. The territorial authorities recognise this by not persecuting owners of properties which had work done prior to 1992 that didn't get a permit in the same way as they would if the work was done post 1992, and didn't receive a consent.

 

Clear as mud?

 

 

 

 

Not only that but councils records back then can be sketchy, and you didn't need as many documents to build a house. Some houses had just 5 pages of plans and specs. These days it is in the hundreds of pages, with plans and detailing and specs, etc. Also councils have merged and documents can be lost or misfiled. It isn't unusual to find the wrong house plans under the wrong property number from my experience.


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  Reply # 1645988 5-Oct-2016 15:41
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mattwnz:

 

These days it is in the hundreds of pages, with plans and detailing and specs, etc

 

Tell me about it! I'm at 38 A1 pages (10 just of details) of drawings for a house i'm working on right now. And I still have a Spec to write! The first house I drew up needed 10 A3 and a spec, and that was in the early/mid 2000's.


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  Reply # 1645989 5-Oct-2016 15:45
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Disrespective:

 

mattwnz:

 

These days it is in the hundreds of pages, with plans and detailing and specs, etc

 

Tell me about it! I'm at 38 A1 pages (10 just of details) of drawings for a house i'm working on right now. And I still have a Spec to write! The first house I drew up needed 10 A3 and a spec, and that was in the early/mid 2000's.

 

 

WOW does that mean kit aka GJ Gardner houses should be 10X cheaper than architect designed? Ready made plans, ready made material, ready made everything. 





Swype on iOS is detrimental to accurate typing. Apologies in advance.


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  Reply # 1645992 5-Oct-2016 15:49
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joker97:

 

WOW does that mean kit aka GJ Gardner houses should be 10X cheaper than architect designed? Ready made plans, ready made material, ready made everything. 

 

 

No because most of the crap they have to do is site related. That is why it is easier for them to build on new subdivisions than putting a house on a back or front section etc.

 

This is most of the problem with housing costs in NZ. So expensive to do anything because they over-regulate it. And expect people to want to build a totally permanant housing solution. Not saying that everyone should be living in trailers but commiting to the same land use for 50+ years is IMO a bit stupid.





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  Reply # 1646015 5-Oct-2016 16:30
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richms:

 

joker97:

 

WOW does that mean kit aka GJ Gardner houses should be 10X cheaper than architect designed? Ready made plans, ready made material, ready made everything. 

 

 

No because most of the crap they have to do is site related. That is why it is easier for them to build on new subdivisions than putting a house on a back or front section etc.

 

This is most of the problem with housing costs in NZ. So expensive to do anything because they over-regulate it. And expect people to want to build a totally permanant housing solution. Not saying that everyone should be living in trailers but commiting to the same land use for 50+ years is IMO a bit stupid.

 

 

 

 

You can blame much of it on the leaky building crisis, as people expect someone else to pay for any issues with the house they buy or build.

 

 

 

But part of the problem is lack of competition in the housing and materials market. Many of brands of products are owned by the same parent company. We pay so much more for materials than they cost in Oz and the US. With so much building going on you would expect material prices to be coming down due to economies of scale, but they aren't. If the government did a pharmacy type model for a kiwibuild system for buying in building materials in builk, NZ could potentially save a lot of money, and bring down the cost of building houses.


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