Geekzone: technology news, blogs, forums
Guest
Welcome Guest.
You haven't logged in yet. If you don't have an account you can register now.


View this topic in a long page with up to 500 replies per page Create new topic
1 | 2 | 3 | 4

mdf



2352 posts

Uber Geek

Trusted
Subscriber

  # 1675077 21-Nov-2016 16:54
Send private message

timmmay:

 

The WCC / Tank guy tanks aren't sealed, they have a hole near the top and the lid is just sitting there. I'd go for a barrel with a good screw on lid, but if you can't find one that WCC one is good enough.

 

 

The hole near the top is for the rainwater diverter spout to come in. The lid does lock on with a twist, but you are right it doesn't seal tight.

 

We had one at our old place and I was always surprised at how gunge-free the water was when I checked it, but there were definitely some bits of detritus floating in the water. You'd want to filter (and boil) it before drinking.


15345 posts

Uber Geek

Trusted
Subscriber

  # 1675078 21-Nov-2016 16:55
Send private message

Yeah it does twist on, and I just put duct tape over the diverter hole so I can uncover easily if required.

 

Boiling water in an emergency is unlikely to be possible, unless you have a camp stove or BBQ, and that could take a lot of gas to boil all the water. Water treatment tablets are easier.


 
 
 
 


mdf



2352 posts

Uber Geek

Trusted
Subscriber

  # 1675090 21-Nov-2016 17:10
Send private message

I've just invested in a camping burner that runs of a 9kg gas bottle to let us boil water if we need it. But water purification tablets are a great idea too.

3024 posts

Uber Geek


  # 1675093 21-Nov-2016 17:18
Send private message

Marley water tank section has overflow vacuum details. Sucks from bottom when tank full. Once level drops siphon is broken so stops.

235 posts

Master Geek


  # 1675108 21-Nov-2016 18:09
Send private message

mdf:

 

@ObidiahSlope - I couldn't see a siphon discharge option on the Marley website?

 

 

Not specificity mentioned because it is simply a U shaped pipe with top at the overflow level and the discharge point below the tank floor level to operate the siphon.

 

Another point. I have a "thermette" or as the English call them a "camp volcano" which is a wood fired water jacket heater on standby for use in emergencies where water needs to be boiled and utility services are out of action. This type of appliance is an efficient water heater in challenging conditions. They were often used for picnics. They are hard to come by as they have fallen out of general use. If you see one at a second hand store I would advise you to buy it.





Obsequious hypocrite

3024 posts

Uber Geek


  # 1675134 21-Nov-2016 19:00
Send private message

Keeping it in-house see http://www.geekzone.co.nz/Dav4122/8671  hole in top angle is to stop siphon once water level has dropped a bit. Depending on how much vacuuming you wanted that hole could be further down the pipe. Without it the water would all go if the outlet was low enough.


4176 posts

Uber Geek

Subscriber

  # 1675157 21-Nov-2016 20:12
Send private message

mdf:

 

Drinking water hoses seem to have an outer with an inner core. The outer has all the stuff that makes a hose tough enough to actually use, but the inner core (that the water runs through) is made out of the whimpy stuff that is safe but wouldn't last on its own outdoors. I've just bought one from Bunnings. And brass fittings for it, thinking I was doing the right thing there. Whoops.

 

 

Can you please post the link of the Bunnings hose, if you've spotted it on their website? (Or even its exact name?) Thanks.

 

mdf:

 

- The guy in Christchurch with the black barrels has a notice on his website advising that shipping north has been disrupted (unsurprisingly). It's also pretty expensive - $55-odd. I've been looking around in Wellington but most of the hardware stores seem pretty cleaned out.

 

 

Yep, I got a reply from them today as well - for delivery to PN I got quoted $45 per barrel if ordering two or more, or $74 for a single barrel! That's not happening...

 

mdf:

 

- If someone does find a supplier that can ship to Wellington and is interested in putting together a bulk order, I'd probably be keen on participating. I have a few other enquiries out and will report back if I hear anything further.

 

 

Do you have a requirement to purchase new? If not, perhaps you missed the link above to the s/h 200 litre barrels (these previously held sugar syrup or vinegar)? $65 and $15 delivery to lower NI (or pick-up Kapiti Coast). 


 
 
 
 


mdf



2352 posts

Uber Geek

Trusted
Subscriber

  # 1675175 21-Nov-2016 21:28
Send private message

jonathan18:

 

Can you please post the link of the Bunnings hose, if you've spotted it on their website? (Or even its exact name?) Thanks.

 

 

Pope drinking hose. We got the 10m version but there is 20m too. It was flipping hard to find in the store too. I was sure I had seen them with the normal hoses before but after scouring through every option it turns out they were in the next aisle.

 

 

Do you have a requirement to purchase new? If not, perhaps you missed the link above to the s/h 200 litre barrels (these previously held sugar syrup or vinegar)? $65 and $15 delivery to lower NI (or pick-up Kapiti Coast). 

 

 

I'd probably prefer new. I looked at some of the rainharvest guy's other listings, and he suggests (disclaims) that they're not suitable for drinking water, e.g. "For Garden water or other purposes. * Not recommended for Potable/Drinking water, potable containers should be purpose built & made from virgin plastic.*."

 

While clearly in an emergency you'd be knocking back vinegary water like it was mother's milk, I thought I'd look around for an option that was designed for drinking. I may fall back on that option though. $65 isn't a big investment.


mdf



2352 posts

Uber Geek

Trusted
Subscriber

  # 1675176 21-Nov-2016 21:30
Send private message

Bung:

 

Keeping it in-house see http://www.geekzone.co.nz/Dav4122/8671  hole in top angle is to stop siphon once water level has dropped a bit. Depending on how much vacuuming you wanted that hole could be further down the pipe. Without it the water would all go if the outlet was low enough.

 

 

This is cool. I love old how old school physics still has plenty of answers for modern problems. But how do you prime the siphon?


3024 posts

Uber Geek


  # 1675260 21-Nov-2016 23:06
Send private message

When the water rises high enough to come out the overflow the air break hole is covered so the pipe will suck from the bottom (plus some through the hole) until the level drops to the hole allowing air in.

1772 posts

Uber Geek

Trusted

  # 1675365 22-Nov-2016 09:21
Send private message

ObidiahSlope:

 

Another point. I have a "thermette" or as the English call them a "camp volcano" which is a wood fired water jacket heater on standby for use in emergencies where water needs to be boiled and utility services are out of action. This type of appliance is an efficient water heater in challenging conditions. They were often used for picnics. They are hard to come by as they have fallen out of general use. If you see one at a second hand store I would advise you to buy it.

 

 

I remember those - I recall roadworkers, telecom linespeople, etc, would use those when out in the road and not near a source of electricity. I guess with the easy availability of butane canisters, etc, have essentially made these redundant.

 

Until you cant get the canisters :-)





My thoughts are no longer my own and is probably representative of our media-controlled government


474 posts

Ultimate Geek


  # 1675368 22-Nov-2016 09:31
Send private message

It probably goes without saying, but it's a good idea to make sure whatever water containers you use are well secured, especially if they have an open top.  Lest they tip over and rupture/pour out.


4176 posts

Uber Geek

Subscriber

  # 1675369 22-Nov-2016 09:31
One person supports this post
Send private message

SepticSceptic:

 

ObidiahSlope:

 

Another point. I have a "thermette" or as the English call them a "camp volcano" which is a wood fired water jacket heater on standby for use in emergencies where water needs to be boiled and utility services are out of action. This type of appliance is an efficient water heater in challenging conditions. They were often used for picnics. They are hard to come by as they have fallen out of general use. If you see one at a second hand store I would advise you to buy it.

 

 

I remember those - I recall roadworkers, telecom linespeople, etc, would use those when out in the road and not near a source of electricity. I guess with the easy availability of butane canisters, etc, have essentially made these redundant.

 

Until you cant get the canisters :-)

 

 

My father was really keen on Thermettes - a first stage of setting up camp each night was boiling the jug for a hot drink using one, He bought me a s/h one; this forms part of our (currently inadequate) emergency kit. We've got wood in the shed, so more than enough fuel for it.

 

A quick search shows Thermettes are still made! They look quite stunning in all their new copper glory - nothing like mine...

 

 


Banana?
4871 posts

Uber Geek

Subscriber

  # 1675382 22-Nov-2016 09:55
Send private message

Yep, thermettes are awesome.

 

The parents used to have one (wasn't copper though - I remember it being painted red?), bloody brilliant at boiling water and was taken on a few holidays.

 

They have always been (and still are) very expensive.


3024 posts

Uber Geek


  # 1675387 22-Nov-2016 10:01
Send private message

SepticSceptic: l remember those - I recall roadworkers, telecom linespeople, etc, would use those when out in the road and not near a source of electricity. I guess with the easy availability of butane canisters, etc, have essentially made these redundant.


We carry a gas burner in the car. It is slow as a wet week unless the water is already hot (ex thermos). As a child i remember spending the odd day during holidays as tea boy on a building site. The thermette was fuelled by a slosh of kero on some cotton waste and was much quicker. The usual Army practice was to pour some petrol onto sand burn that.

1 | 2 | 3 | 4
View this topic in a long page with up to 500 replies per page Create new topic



Twitter and LinkedIn »



Follow us to receive Twitter updates when new discussions are posted in our forums:



Follow us to receive Twitter updates when news items and blogs are posted in our frontpage:



Follow us to receive Twitter updates when tech item prices are listed in our price comparison site:





News »

Chorus to launch Hyperfibre service
Posted 18-Nov-2019 15:00


Microsoft launches first Experience Center worldwide for Asia Pacific in Singapore
Posted 13-Nov-2019 13:08


Disney+ comes to LG Smart TVs
Posted 13-Nov-2019 12:55


Spark launches new wireless broadband "Unplan Metro"
Posted 11-Nov-2019 08:19


Malwarebytes overhauls flagship product with new UI, faster engine and lighter footprint
Posted 6-Nov-2019 11:48


CarbonClick launches into Digital Marketplaces
Posted 6-Nov-2019 11:42


Kordia offers Microsoft Azure Peering Service
Posted 6-Nov-2019 11:41


Spark 5G live on Auckland Harbour for Emirates Team New Zealand
Posted 4-Nov-2019 17:30


BNZ and Vodafone partner to boost NZ Tech for SME
Posted 31-Oct-2019 17:14


Nokia 7.2 available in New Zealand
Posted 31-Oct-2019 16:24


2talk launches Microsoft Teams Direct Routing product
Posted 29-Oct-2019 10:35


New Breast Cancer Foundation app puts power in Kiwi women's hands
Posted 25-Oct-2019 16:13


OPPO Reno2 Series lands, alongside hybrid noise-cancelling Wireless Headphones
Posted 24-Oct-2019 15:32


Waikato Data Scientists awarded $13 million from the Government
Posted 24-Oct-2019 15:27


D-Link launches Wave 2 Unified Access Points
Posted 24-Oct-2019 15:07



Geekzone Live »

Try automatic live updates from Geekzone directly in your browser, without refreshing the page, with Geekzone Live now.


Support Geekzone »

Our community of supporters help make Geekzone possible. Click the button below to join them.

Support Geezone on PressPatron



Are you subscribed to our RSS feed? You can download the latest headlines and summaries from our stories directly to your computer or smartphone by using a feed reader.

Alternatively, you can receive a daily email with Geekzone updates.