Geekzone: technology news, blogs, forums
Guest
Welcome Guest.
You haven't logged in yet. If you don't have an account you can register now.




3 posts

Wannabe Geek


# 207751 12-Jan-2017 11:35
Send private message

Hi there,

 

I've read a lot about what it's legal to do yourself and what's not, but mostly it discusses wiring a home, while I'm more interested in repairing/altering appliances. For example, if I buy a temperature controller (like STC-1000), I'm not allowed to actually connect it and switch on until an electrician inspects it, right? If so, is such inspection feasible or too complicated/expensive?

 

What if I brought with me some stuff I made in another country where I lived before?


Create new topic
27768 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 7254

Moderator
Trusted
Biddle Corp
Lifetime subscriber

  # 1701978 12-Jan-2017 11:56
Send private message

If you imported electrical goods they need to meet electrical guidelines (which is pretty much AS/NZ standards) before they can be used here.


1663 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 378

Trusted
Lifetime subscriber

  # 1701986 12-Jan-2017 12:18
Send private message

 

 

Hi there,

 

 

 

I've read a lot about what it's legal to do yourself and what's not, but mostly it discusses wiring a home, while I'm more interested in repairing/altering appliances. For example, if I buy a temperature controller (like STC-1000), I'm not allowed to actually connect it and switch on until an electrician inspects it, right? If so, is such inspection feasible or too complicated/expensive?

 

 

 

What if I brought with me some stuff I made in another country where I lived before?

 

 

 

 

If repairing appliances you need to be an registered EST (Electrical service tech) if altering them you would need to provide proof that they are safe, usually in the form of an electrical safety certificate.

 

 

 

 if you are importing an appliance for your own personal use then there arn't (AFAIK) any requirements to test before use, if you are importing to on sell then you must supply a suppliers document of conformity which means it must go through a testing process to prove it's safety, this process can be quite expensive.

 

 

 

 

 

As far a importing items for personal use, there is a lot of reliance on common sense, such as correct voltage, suitable for use etc, as soon as you want to make money from doing it, then it needs to be proved it meets the current regulations through the testing process.

 
 
 
 


588 posts

Ultimate Geek
+1 received by user: 188
Inactive user


  # 1702026 12-Jan-2017 13:25
Send private message

When it comes to appliances there are some grey areas that "are not a problem until they're a problem".

 

Firstly whatever you import / produce must comply with EMC requirements: https://www.rsm.govt.nz/compliance/supplier-requirements/how-to-ensure-your-products-comply

 

Secondly depending on the type of appliance there are different degrees of evidence required for electrical safety: http://www.energysafety.govt.nz/appliances-fittings/electrical-appliances-fittings

 

Thirdly there may be other industry specific requirements for mechanical safety, food safety, medical use approvals, mining etc.

 

 

 

In regards to carrying out work on an appliance; basically anything over 50V is considered "prescribed electrical work" and must be carried out by an approved person (Electrician or Electrical Appliance Service-person).....with some exceptions providing you are doing so for yourself without payment or reward:

 

 

 

Electricity (Safety) Regulations 2010, Schedule 1, Section 2: Non-prescribed electrical work:

 

"(a)(i) replacing a fuse link with a fuse link or plug-in miniature circuit breaker of an appropriate rating; or"

 

"(a)(ii) affixing a plug, adaptor, cord extension socket, or appliance connector of an appropriate rating to a flexible cord designed for that purpose:"

 

"(m) installing temporary conductors between fittings (or between appliances, or between fittings and appliances) or repairing fittings and appliances, but only if the fittings or appliances are used for experimental, testing, demonstration, teaching, or research purposes in any electrical engineering workshop, manufacturing facility, electrical test facility, laboratory, hospital, research project, or teaching institution:" (this implies you are competent to do the work you are carrying out, have the appropriate test equipment and take proper precautions such as RCD protection, isolating transformers etc.)

 

"(j) maintaining appliances, but only if the work is done in accordance with user instructions prepared by the manufacturer and supplied with the appliance to the user:"

 

"(k) repairing or reworking an appliance, but only if it is undertaken in accordance with the instructions of the original manufacturer of the appliance:"

 

 

 

You can also carry out any work under "supervision" of an electrician (does not necessarily have to be in person).

 

Electricity (Safety) Regulations 2010, Part 7, Section 92: Limits of work that supervised persons may do

 

 

 

 

 

In addition with the above you you should also make yourself familiar with the following:

 

New Zealand Electrical Code of Practice for Repair and Maintenance of Domestic Electrical Appliances by the Owner of the Appliance (NZECP 50:2004)

 

New Zealand Electrical Code of Practice for Homeowner/Occupier's Electrical Wiring Work in Domestic Installations (NZECP 51:2004)

 

AS/NZS 5762 "In-service safety inspection and testing - Repaired electrical equipment" 

 

and/or AS/NZS 3760 "In-service safety inspection and testing of electrical equipment"




3 posts

Wannabe Geek


  # 1702171 12-Jan-2017 16:44
Send private message

Thanks.

 

First of all I should make it clear that I'm talking only about appliances used intermittently by myself at home and of course not about any paid work, products for sale, etc.

 

I've seen most of the linked documents before, still, there are some items in the list of not prescribed electrical work that are not quite clear:

 

 

 

(k) repairing or reworking an appliance, but only if it is undertaken in accordance with the instructions of the original manufacturer of the appliance

 

What's considered an appliance (versus, maybe, a "component")? Pretty much anything that's meant for DIY will come with an instruction. Again with a temperature controller as an example - it comes with instructions how to wire it.

 

I don't think a home can normally be considered an engineering workshop or a laboratory, but the next item confuses me:

 

(n) experimental work on radio transmitters, receivers, and electronic apparatus, but only if the work is not carried out for payment or reward

 

Does this statement only apply to radio equipment? I'm confused by the "and electronic apparatus" part.

 

 


588 posts

Ultimate Geek
+1 received by user: 188
Inactive user


  # 1702185 12-Jan-2017 17:55
Send private message

peter1823:

 

 

 

What's considered an appliance (versus, maybe, a "component")? Pretty much anything that's meant for DIY will come with an instruction. Again with a temperature controller as an example - it comes with instructions how to wire it.

 

 

 

 

"electrical appliance means any appliance that uses, or is designed or intended to use, electricity, whether or not it also uses, or is designed or intended to use, any other form of energy"

 

Anything that "uses" (converts) electricity is an electrical appliance.

 

e.g. A simple restive heating element connected to a flexible supply cable that can be plugged into a wall outlet = electrical appliance.

 

A resistor by itself is not an appliance.

 

The regulations don't cover "components" themselves but once you put them into an appliance or fixed wired "installation" the entire appliance / installation must comply with the relevant regulations.

 

 

 

 

 

peter1823:

 

I don't think a home can normally be considered an engineering workshop or a laboratory,

 

 

Depends, if you saw my home or some other Geekzoner's... wink

 

 

 

peter1823:

 

 

 

Does this statement only apply to radio equipment? I'm confused by the "and electronic apparatus" part.

 

 

"electronic apparatus" ≠ "electrical apparatus". Electronic would constitute <50V SELV.

 

 

 

 

 

As I mentioned there are some grey areas and mostly depends on your "competence" in the area; in regards to your specific scenario I would be asking:

 

a) Was your STC-1000 controller was purchased from a reputable source, marked with overseas approvals (CE, TUV etc) and appropriately rated (240VAC). Ideally with an SDoC supplied?

 

b) Are you intending to connect your controller only to other approved non-fixed-wired appliances?

 

c) Are you connecting the controller to a mains outlet and to the other appliances with properly rated double insulated flexible supply cables?

 

d) Is there is some form of over-current protection and accessible means of disconnection between the finished appliance and the mains outlet?

 

 

 

e) Do you have the tools (multi-meter, Megger or PAT) to verify polarity of the mains supply to the appliances and to test insulation and/or grounding of all accessible parts?

 

f) Again; are ALL accessible parts double insulated or grounded AND no live conductors accessible without the aid of a tool?

 

g) Are you 100% confident all of the above and with what you are doing?

 

 

 

If "yes" to all of the above I wouldn't have a problem carrying out that work under these provisions however if you have any doubts whatsoever about what you are doing obviously get a qualified person to help you out.

 

If you can provide more information about your project such as your proposed wiring diagram and components we can advise further.




3 posts

Wannabe Geek


  # 1705784 19-Jan-2017 13:47
Send private message

solutionz:

 

 

 

As I mentioned there are some grey areas and mostly depends on your "competence" in the area; in regards to your specific scenario I would be asking:

 

a) Was your STC-1000 controller was purchased from a reputable source, marked with overseas approvals (CE, TUV etc) and appropriately rated (240VAC). Ideally with an SDoC supplied?

 

b) Are you intending to connect your controller only to other approved non-fixed-wired appliances?

 

c) Are you connecting the controller to a mains outlet and to the other appliances with properly rated double insulated flexible supply cables?

 

d) Is there is some form of over-current protection and accessible means of disconnection between the finished appliance and the mains outlet?

 

 

 

e) Do you have the tools (multi-meter, Megger or PAT) to verify polarity of the mains supply to the appliances and to test insulation and/or grounding of all accessible parts?

 

f) Again; are ALL accessible parts double insulated or grounded AND no live conductors accessible without the aid of a tool?

 

g) Are you 100% confident all of the above and with what you are doing?

 

 

 

If "yes" to all of the above I wouldn't have a problem carrying out that work under these provisions however if you have any doubts whatsoever about what you are doing obviously get a qualified person to help you out.

 

If you can provide more information about your project such as your proposed wiring diagram and components we can advise further.

 

 

Well, being a random new guy here, I can't prove anything, but yeah I have tools and enough experience, and use good quality cables and components as much as I can. So basically it's not about safety - I'm pretty sure that what I do will not harm anyone or damage property - but that alone doesn't make it legal unfortunately, as I understand. On the other hand, as long as nothing bas happens, no one will know, but still it being illegal bothers me.


680 posts

Ultimate Geek
+1 received by user: 129

Subscriber

  # 1705817 19-Jan-2017 14:54
Send private message

peter1823:

 

 

 

Well, being a random new guy here, I can't prove anything, but yeah I have tools and enough experience, and use good quality cables and components as much as I can. So basically it's not about safety - I'm pretty sure that what I do will not harm anyone or damage property - but that alone doesn't make it legal unfortunately, as I understand. On the other hand, as long as nothing bas happens, no one will know, but still it being illegal bothers me.

 

 

 

 

Hey,

 

You might want to think about insurances issues. If you have an electrical fire and an investigation finds some non-certified DIY electrical work, you can be sure your insurance will be able to weasel out of paying off ;-)


1724 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 415


  # 1706299 20-Jan-2017 10:21
Send private message

solutionz:

 

a) Was your STC-1000 controller was purchased from a reputable source, marked with overseas approvals (CE, TUV etc) and appropriately rated (240VAC). Ideally with an SDoC supplied?

 

 

Chinese suppliers have been known to fake certification on goods . And sell fake goods with unsafe wiring
In fact there was a recent case in the US of fake FCC certs , the company involved being fined US$100K (they had a US office)

 

I think the bottom line is , the law is there to protect others, not just the home handyman
Protect the next owner of the house, protect others in the house .
if you need to ask about the legality, perhaps you shouldnt be doing it ?

 

Then again, Im sure all of us have plugged in goods with cheap non certed chinese power packs/power supplies .


Hmm, what to write...
1010 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 522

Trusted
Subscriber

  # 1706314 20-Jan-2017 10:41
Send private message

Section  57 Exemption for domestic electrical wiring work

 

Basically you can do any of the following without needing any kind of inspection or licence (if you are the homeowner)

 

removing and replacing fuse links:

 

connecting and disconnecting fixed-wired appliances:

 

relocating existing switches, socket-outlets, and lighting outlets that are supplied with electricity by tough plastic-sheathed cables:

 

removing and replacing any of the following kinds of fittings (but only if the work does not involve work on a switchboard):

 

switches, socket-outlets, and light fittings:

 

permanent connection units, ceiling roses, cord-grip lampholders, and flexible cords connected to any of them:

 

batten holders:

 

water heater switches:

 

thermostats:

 

elements:

 

But if you are doing the following you need to get it inspected

 

installing, extending, and altering subcircuits (including submains)

 

 

 

*You should read the section in its entirety and how it relates to section 79 if you are planning on doing any of this*

 

 





Matthew


Hmm, what to write...
1010 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 522

Trusted
Subscriber

  # 1706319 20-Jan-2017 10:54
Send private message

and as for your appliances..

 

 

 

and note section (1)(g) does not apply in this instance

 





Matthew


Create new topic



Twitter »

Follow us to receive Twitter updates when new discussions are posted in our forums:



Follow us to receive Twitter updates when news items and blogs are posted in our frontpage:



Follow us to receive Twitter updates when tech item prices are listed in our price comparison site:





News »

HPE to acquire supercomputing leader Cray
Posted 20-May-2019 11:07


Techweek starting around NZ today
Posted 20-May-2019 09:52


Porirua City Council first to adopt new council software solution Datascape
Posted 15-May-2019 12:00


New survey provides insight into schools' technology challenges and plans
Posted 15-May-2019 09:30


Apple Music now available on Alexa devices in Australia and New Zealand
Posted 15-May-2019 09:11


Make a stand against cyberbullying this Pink Shirt Day
Posted 14-May-2019 20:23


Samsung first TV manufacturer to launch the Apple TV App and Airplay 2
Posted 14-May-2019 20:11


Vodafone New Zealand sold
Posted 14-May-2019 07:25


Kordia boosts cloud performance with locally-hosted Microsoft Azure ExpressRoute
Posted 8-May-2019 10:25


Microsoft Azure ExpressRoute in New Zealand opens up faster, more secure internet for Kiwi businesses
Posted 8-May-2019 09:39


Vocus Communications to deliver Microsoft Azure Cloud Solutions through Azure ExpressRoute
Posted 8-May-2019 09:25


Independent NZ feature film #statusPending to premiere during WLG-X
Posted 6-May-2019 22:13


The ultimate dog photoshoot with Nokia 9 PureView #ForgottenDogsofInstagram
Posted 6-May-2019 09:41


Nokia 9 PureView available in New Zealand
Posted 6-May-2019 09:06


Motorola Solutions joins local partners to deliver advanced communications network in New Zealand
Posted 30-Apr-2019 21:50



Geekzone Live »

Try automatic live updates from Geekzone directly in your browser, without refreshing the page, with Geekzone Live now.


Support Geekzone »

Our community of supporters help make Geekzone possible. Click the button below to join them.

Support Geezone on PressPatron



Are you subscribed to our RSS feed? You can download the latest headlines and summaries from our stories directly to your computer or smartphone by using a feed reader.

Alternatively, you can receive a daily email with Geekzone updates.