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93 posts

Master Geek


# 210483 29-Mar-2017 13:11
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We've got a couple of leaks in out gutter, I had a repair guy pop around only to be told he can't fix it due to it being an internal gutter, and to contact Taylor Fascia.

I got Taylor Fascia to pop around and they provided a quote to replace 80% of the gutter, for a hefty price.

I've send photos to another gutter company who also told me that I'd need to get Taylor Fascia to do the repairs...

I've seen a few companies websites state they do internal to external gutter conversions etc etc. And a couple of property talk forums complain about Taylor Fascia styled guttering being a design flaw that can lead to water leaking into your house.

Anyone have some experience with either getting this stuff repaired or replaced?

Thanks,
Paul

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253 posts

Ultimate Geek


  # 1750125 29-Mar-2017 13:33
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Hey Paul, I run a roofing company. Feel free to pm me your number and I'll call you and give you a run down on things if you need more info.

Rick

15286 posts

Uber Geek


  # 1750131 29-Mar-2017 13:43
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Have you got a photo so people can see what you mean? I pressume it is one of those that have a metal fascia and a pvc gutter behind it which is within the soffits. My grandma lived in a retirement flat with with that sort of gutter, but not aware of people having problems. I imagine converting would be very pricey. Not sure why it would be needed if overflows are installed correctly.

 
 
 
 


3231 posts

Uber Geek


  # 1750152 29-Mar-2017 14:22
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Taylor facia should never have been invented! Had it on a past house (it was trendy then) but design lends itself to leaking internally when full or when it fails. If you can I suggest spend a little more and change to traditional external guttering rather than patching a dodgy product.




Always be yourself, unless you can be Batman, then always be the Batman





93 posts

Master Geek


  # 1750190 29-Mar-2017 15:16
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Thanks RickW – PM on its way.

Here's a photo of the guttering/fascia


1199 posts

Uber Geek
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  # 1750246 29-Mar-2017 16:18
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scuwp: Taylor facia should never have been invented! Had it on a past house (it was trendy then) but design lends itself to leaking internally when full or when it fails. If you can I suggest spend a little more and change to traditional external guttering rather than patching a dodgy product.

 

 

 

I was just about to mention this.

 

We were in a newish rental a few years ago. Gutter got clogged up, and one night during some really heavy rain while watching TV we were suddenly looking at the niagra falls. Funny now, but not funny at the time. Luckily it was a rental because it was not just a quick fix either. Water had been seeping into the walls for a long time. Repair costs escalated quickly. It turned out to be a bit of a bun fight between us tenants and homeowner (who tried to blame us for not checking/cleaning gutters regularly enough).

 

I don't see many new houses these days with them.

 

pknz but yours looks like a better design as your soffit it designed to keep water away from the house.

 

 

 

 

254 posts

Ultimate Geek


  # 1750264 29-Mar-2017 16:40
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scuwp: Taylor Fascia should never have been invented! Had it on a past house (it was trendy then) but design lends itself to leaking internally when full or when it fails. If you can I suggest spend a little more and change to traditional external guttering rather than patching a dodgy product.

 

Agree. We have this on the current house- not that I ever knew what it was called until now. It cannot handle extreme rain events and I have to ensure the gutter remains clear of leaves at all times. I get cold shudders when it rains hard and I hear the overflows start running- I go and check the walls and make sure nothing is coming back inside.

 

Plus it has rusted through in parts and I've had to bog it with silicone to stop it coming back into the house. I'm replacing parts shortly but unfortunately due to cost considerations replacing with the same stuff.

 

TL;DR Any failure means water inside the house instead of staying outside where it's meant to be.





I reject your reality and substitute my own!
- Adam Savage, Mythbuster

255 posts

Ultimate Geek


  # 1750305 29-Mar-2017 17:42
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I had Taylor Faschia on my house but removed it all and went to external conventional gutters as a DIY job. My sister had a horror situation as theirs blocked and got into the walls and caused all sorts of damage.

 

Replacing it was a was a mission and all up about 2 - 3 weeks of work. Me and a builder friend did it all much cheaper than getting a roofing/gutter company in. My house is two storied 80's brick house with decromastic tile roof. I did the project this time last year.

 

I had quote and estimates between $3.5k and $16k for various options such as replacing what was there and going to external gutters. I didn't have much faith in the quotes as there were lots of get out clauses and the estimate (which was one of the cheapest prices) was vague. The replacement cost to keep the status quo of the taylor faschia was $3.5k. The $16k was someone to do everything for me with metal external gutters.

 

It's a long story to explain the process of the replacement and I suppose your house may be different. Basically it was scaffold 3 sides of my house ($3k), rip off all the existing faschia and gutters (by myself). I bought metal faschia and brackets from Roofing Industries for about $600 which was much cheaper than timber and doesn't need painting. The metal faschia was also easier to fit and line up. Then I got my builder mate in to help. We had to trim back all the soffits (stringline then cut back with angle grinder - fricken dusty horrible job!) We then had to stringline the ends of the trusses and trim them back as they were uneven. We then had to fix all the faschia and brackets in place but found we had to lift all the perimeter tiles to fix and adjust the brackets on the side of the truss. Once that was all done I fitted all the gutters and downpipes by myself. I used Marley Stratus which is a coloured PVC gutter, it's more expensive than normal PVC but looks much better and was colour matched to the metal faschia in ironsand. I also painted all the soffits while the scaffold was up. The builder cost me $1500, labour only. All up I spent about $7.5k including paint but not including my time.

 

I'm really happy with the result, it looks very good and is almost maintenance free. It did take a lot of time and effort but was rewarding. But if you doubt your skills I wouldn't recommend DIY. Between my mate and I we managed to nut out all the issues and there were quite a few!


 
 
 
 


3885 posts

Uber Geek

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  # 1750426 29-Mar-2017 22:24

scuwp: Taylor facia should never have been invented! Had it on a past house (it was trendy then) but design lends itself to leaking internally when full or when it fails. If you can I suggest spend a little more and change to traditional external guttering rather than patching a dodgy product.

 

 

 

Fully agree also. Just bite the bullet and get it replaced with external guttering. House inspection companies know about taylor facia as well. So if you sell your house you will have to give a discount due to it having taylor facia on it. Safety rules are only going to get tougher, wages are only going to go up. So the cost of replacing it is unlikely to ever go down in the future.






253 posts

Ultimate Geek


  # 1750431 29-Mar-2017 22:38
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A bit of an update that might help someone down the track.

 

I spoke to pknz this avo and because he has a long run roof the best option is to remove the existing gutter and fascia system and install a external system. the work that needs to be done will be quite extensive and will include removing the existing. with the age of the house the soffit board will likely contain asbestos so will need to be replaced and has to be done by licensed asbestos removers. the rafters will need to be cut shorter new fascia installed new soffit installed and new gutter and downpipes installed as well.

 

Any internal gutter systems that are purely for cosmetic reasons are asking for trouble, whoever thought that it was a good idea to have a gutter inside the building envelope seriously needs to be shot.


15286 posts

Uber Geek


  # 1750441 29-Mar-2017 23:52
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Aredwood:

 

scuwp: Taylor facia should never have been invented! Had it on a past house (it was trendy then) but design lends itself to leaking internally when full or when it fails. If you can I suggest spend a little more and change to traditional external guttering rather than patching a dodgy product.

 

 

 

Fully agree also. Just bite the bullet and get it replaced with external guttering. House inspection companies know about taylor facia as well. So if you sell your house you will have to give a discount due to it having taylor facia on it. Safety rules are only going to get tougher, wages are only going to go up. So the cost of replacing it is unlikely to ever go down in the future.

 

 

There are a lot of spec houses, and houses built by developers over the last 20 or so years with this types of gutters. Many retirement  villages have this type of gutter. I believe some are better than others, and some have overflows. We didn't have any problem selling my grandmas retirement home unit, and it had these types of gutters, and never had any problem with htem, but they never blocked up due to there not being any trees around the house.

 

However you can potentially  get the same problem occurring with external gutters, if they are not installed correctly. I have seem some external gutters installed right up to the bargeboard so there is no gap between the back of the gutter and the bargeboard. As the out part of teh gutter can be higher than the back of the bargeboard,  when the gutter overflows, it just ends up flowing over the back of the bargeboard, into the soffit. If the soffit is flat, it can track into the walls.

 

As the OPs soffit is sloped away, they are in a better position, than those with flat soffits.


15286 posts

Uber Geek


  # 1750442 29-Mar-2017 23:56
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RickW:

 

A bit of an update that might help someone down the track.

 

I spoke to pknz this avo and because he has a long run roof the best option is to remove the existing gutter and fascia system and install a external system. the work that needs to be done will be quite extensive and will include removing the existing. with the age of the house the soffit board will likely contain asbestos so will need to be replaced and has to be done by licensed asbestos removers. the rafters will need to be cut shorter new fascia installed new soffit installed and new gutter and downpipes installed as well.

 

Any internal gutter systems that are purely for cosmetic reasons are asking for trouble, whoever thought that it was a good idea to have a gutter inside the building envelope seriously needs to be shot.

 

 

 

 

How old is the house? I don't think these gutters haven't been around for more than a couple of decades, and Asbestos hasn't been used for a long time. But I imagine you may need a building consent, as you will be changing the type of guttering detail, and I think you now need it for asbestos removal, if it is infact asbestos. I would check with council, because you don't want any consent work that you do, picked up buy the buyer.


3055 posts

Uber Geek


  # 1750453 30-Mar-2017 00:44
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Well Kickinbac says his place was mid 80s which coincides with the change to asbestos free Hardie board. Hopefully he checked his before grinding away. The factory change didn't mean all supplies ran out on the same day.

253 posts

Ultimate Geek


  # 1750471 30-Mar-2017 08:00
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mattwnz:

RickW:


A bit of an update that might help someone down the track.


I spoke to pknz this avo and because he has a long run roof the best option is to remove the existing gutter and fascia system and install a external system. the work that needs to be done will be quite extensive and will include removing the existing. with the age of the house the soffit board will likely contain asbestos so will need to be replaced and has to be done by licensed asbestos removers. the rafters will need to be cut shorter new fascia installed new soffit installed and new gutter and downpipes installed as well.


Any internal gutter systems that are purely for cosmetic reasons are asking for trouble, whoever thought that it was a good idea to have a gutter inside the building envelope seriously needs to be shot.



 


How old is the house? I don't think these gutters haven't been around for more than a couple of decades, and Asbestos hasn't been used for a long time. But I imagine you may need a building consent, as you will be changing the type of guttering detail, and I think you now need it for asbestos removal, if it is infact asbestos. I would check with council, because you don't want any consent work that you do, picked up buy the buyer.



The house was built in the late 70's- early 80's. every time we have done one of these conversions to an external gutter system we have had the soffit board tested and we are yet to find one that has not contained asbestos. Most councils only require a PS3. (producer statement) no consents needed for asbestos removal you do have to be qualified and provide worksafe 5 days notice of any asbestos work being done tho.

255 posts

Ultimate Geek


  # 1750482 30-Mar-2017 08:34
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I probably should have said mid to late 80's. Our house was built in 87/88. I had a piece tested by Dowdell & Associates and they said it contained no asbestos. It costs $85.

 

 


255 posts

Ultimate Geek


  # 1750507 30-Mar-2017 09:00
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There is a another way to deal with overflows and that is to have overflows fitted to the gutters. A hole is cut through the taylor faschia and a pipe cut through into the gutter. If the gutters fill up too much they then overflow to the outside of the building.

 

Some houses are difficult to install the external gutter as the soffit not wide enough and the wall is too close to install the faschia. My house has 600mm wide soffits all round.


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