Geekzone: technology news, blogs, forums
Guest
Welcome Guest.
You haven't logged in yet. If you don't have an account you can register now.




34 posts

Geek


# 212703 7-Apr-2017 23:06
Send private message

Hi Everyone,

 

I have recently found out this thing called Thermal Glass Coating thing, or nano coating something like that, it is supposed to reduce UV, improve insulation, reduce heat lose compare to normal glass, has anyone used this thing around here? how well does it actually work....

 

 

 

you can google it or search in youtube and there are some video about it...

 

thanks in advance

 

 


View this topic in a long page with up to 500 replies per page Create new topic
 1 | 2
8533 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 2929

Lifetime subscriber

  # 1759317 8-Apr-2017 06:14
Send private message

post a link to it


496 posts

Ultimate Geek
+1 received by user: 36

Lifetime subscriber

  # 1759363 8-Apr-2017 09:28
Send private message

I wonder if this is what he means

 

 

 

http://kristalbond.co.nz/window-insulation-nano-technology/

 

 

 

And no I haven't used it.





'We love to buy books because we believe we’re buying the time to read them.' WARREN ZEVON


 
 
 
 


14785 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 2750

Trusted
Subscriber

  # 1759365 8-Apr-2017 09:35
Send private message

What a load of crap on that kristal bond page. The grammar is terrible as well

 

"In the winter, the heat you generate inside your home, is absorbed into the glass, forming a heat curtain, or barrier.  Neither Double Glazing or window film can does this, which is why the coating is so effective. "


458 posts

Ultimate Geek
+1 received by user: 257

Trusted

  # 1759377 8-Apr-2017 09:59
Send private message

There was a case several years ago where the advertising standards authority gave a similar company a spanking for unsubstantiated claims about the performance of it's product.

"A claim that a window film would "keep in 90% of your home's heat" was likely to mislead consumers the Advertising Standards Authority has found."



34 posts

Geek


  # 1759469 8-Apr-2017 14:09
Send private message

I can't really afford doing double glazing, because i have got aluminium frames in my house, i want to improve insulation of the windows, i also suffer from the intense sun in summer as rooms get too hot and furniture gets de-coloured by the sun, if this solution can really do reduce UV, make room cooler in summer, improve heat loss in winter, reduce condensation at the same time, it just sounds too good to be true.

 

 

 

check these video out, one of them is in japannse, anyone understand japanese?

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Who6puaeoKQ

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dh9Tv-4y1Bc

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mRy-cA_TXD4&t=21s

 

 

 

there is also a USA company does similar thing.

 

http://www.nansulate.com/windowinsulation.html

 

 

 

 

 

 




34 posts

Geek


  # 1759472 8-Apr-2017 14:19
Send private message

Morgenmuffel:

 

I wonder if this is what he means

 

 

 

http://kristalbond.co.nz/window-insulation-nano-technology/

 

 

 

And no I haven't used it.

 

 

 

 

yes, that is the nz site i found that does it. there are a number of companies in Japan, USA that do similar things, not sure if they all use the same product, or similar. 




34 posts

Geek


  # 1759473 8-Apr-2017 14:21
Send private message

timmmay:

 

What a load of crap on that kristal bond page. The grammar is terrible as well

 

"In the winter, the heat you generate inside your home, is absorbed into the glass, forming a heat curtain, or barrier.  Neither Double Glazing or window film can does this, which is why the coating is so effective. "

 

 

 

 

yeah, i agree, that sentence doesn't really make sense. I still don't understand what they are trying to say there.


 
 
 
 


918 posts

Ultimate Geek
+1 received by user: 812

Trusted
Chorus

  # 1759625 8-Apr-2017 23:30
Send private message

yinian:

 

I can't really afford doing double glazing, because i have got aluminium frames in my house, i want to improve insulation of the windows, i also suffer from the intense sun in summer as rooms get too hot and furniture gets de-coloured by the sun, if this solution can really do reduce UV, make room cooler in summer, improve heat loss in winter, reduce condensation at the same time, it just sounds too good to be true.

 

 

Have you looked into retro-fitted double glazing? They can use the existing aluminium frames and they make it look pretty painless. I have no idea what it costs, but you could look at just doing it only for the windows you are having trouble with to keep the cost down. I'd suggest a tinted window pane at the same time which may help with the heat and furniture fade. Or for the really cheap option, some venetian or roman blinds could help.

 

The floor to ceiling window in my dining area has tinted double glazing as well as roman blinds. The room faces west, so in summer I draw the blinds and angle them at 45 degrees when I get home from work to take the sting out of the sun.


14876 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 2017


  # 1759628 9-Apr-2017 00:30
Send private message

Wheelbarrow01:

 

 

 

Have you looked into retro-fitted double glazing? They can use the existing aluminium frames and they make it look pretty painless. I have no idea what it costs, but you could look at just doing it only for the windows you are having trouble with to keep the cost down.

 

 

 

 

Sure it isn't painless on the wallet though. There are different companies that do this using different methods, some better than others. But the best way is to install proper IGU's into the frame. Retrofitted IGUs will have to be a lot thinner, with thinner glass and air gap, so aren't likely to be as effective as new windows with IGUs. If doing significant renovations, you will usually see the entire window replaced, and that also gives the option to install thermally broken frames. Last time I got a quote for a new build last year, thermally broken frames are about 30% more to have thermally broken frames at the moment, which doesn't make too much sense, but hopefully that price will come down, and they will become standard. Unfortunately not too much competition in the materials market in NZ, so for many materials we do pay a lot more than they do overseas.

 

 

 

To be honest, even with double glazing, you will still get a lot of heat loss through the windows. A better use of money for more gain can be super insulation on the ceiling which has the most heat loss, and possibly walls.


236 posts

Master Geek
+1 received by user: 67


  # 1759642 9-Apr-2017 04:40
Send private message

The problem with treatments on single glazing is that, even if you inhibit infra-red (heat from inside), conduction takes over to decrease the temperature gradient between inside and outside.

Glass is already a reasonable barrier to ir (that's why your car heats up so effectively when it's parked in the sun).

1828 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 215
Inactive user


  # 1759696 9-Apr-2017 09:47
Send private message

Lastman:

Glass is already a reasonable barrier to ir (that's why your car heats up so effectively when it's parked in the sun).

 

 

 

No it isn't if glass was a reasonable barrier to IR then your car wouldn't heat up when parked it the sun most if not all car windows have some for of UV protection but none have any form of IR if clear glass some factory/after market tinted windows do have limited IR protection simply because of the tint 


236 posts

Master Geek
+1 received by user: 67


  # 1759712 9-Apr-2017 10:32
Send private message

Athlonite:

Lastman:

Glass is already a reasonable barrier to ir (that's why your car heats up so effectively when it's parked in the sun).


 


No it isn't if glass was a reasonable barrier to IR then your car wouldn't heat up when parked it the sun most if not all car windows have some for of UV protection but none have any form of IR if clear glass some factory/after market tinted windows do have limited IR protection simply because of the tint 



The energy that heats up the inside is from visible and higher frequency IR radiated in. IR from the inside surfaces of the car does not radiate out so easily.

1828 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 215
Inactive user


  # 1759804 9-Apr-2017 14:33
Send private message

Lastman:
Athlonite:

 

Lastman:

Glass is already a reasonable barrier to ir (that's why your car heats up so effectively when it's parked in the sun).

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

No it isn't if glass was a reasonable barrier to IR then your car wouldn't heat up when parked it the sun most if not all car windows have some for of UV protection but none have any form of IR if clear glass some factory/after market tinted windows do have limited IR protection simply because of the tint 

 



The energy that heats up the inside is from visible and higher frequency IR radiated in. IR from the inside surfaces of the car does not radiate out so easily.

 

 

 

And that's because glass is a very poor heat conductor 


236 posts

Master Geek
+1 received by user: 67


  # 1759813 9-Apr-2017 15:05
Send private message

Athlonite:

Lastman:
Athlonite:


Lastman:

Glass is already a reasonable barrier to ir (that's why your car heats up so effectively when it's parked in the sun).


 


 


 


No it isn't if glass was a reasonable barrier to IR then your car wouldn't heat up when parked it the sun most if not all car windows have some for of UV protection but none have any form of IR if clear glass some factory/after market tinted windows do have limited IR protection simply because of the tint 




The energy that heats up the inside is from visible and higher frequency IR radiated in. IR from the inside surfaces of the car does not radiate out so easily.


 


And that's because glass is a very poor heat conductor 


No, conduction and radiation are different things. I did say in my first post that conduction becomes lthe primary driver of heat loss when radiation is reduced. Double glazing reduces conduction loss in combination with radiation loss.

gzt

10748 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 1777


  # 1759917 9-Apr-2017 20:23
Send private message

Looks like a number of outfits are providing this service. I had a look at a few websites. The claims about UV reduction and IR reduction should be easy to verify with cheap equipment.

Then it's down to two things: The quality and durability of the formulation, and the skill and technical ability of the applicator.

What surprises me, I can find no well known names supplying this stuff. For instance, if it was any good, and durable, I'd expect 3M or similar to have a product. The fact that they don't, makes me suspicious as to the durability and reliability of the product.

 1 | 2
View this topic in a long page with up to 500 replies per page Create new topic



Twitter and LinkedIn »



Follow us to receive Twitter updates when new discussions are posted in our forums:



Follow us to receive Twitter updates when news items and blogs are posted in our frontpage:



Follow us to receive Twitter updates when tech item prices are listed in our price comparison site:





News »

Air New Zealand uses drones to inspect aircraft
Posted 17-Jun-2019 15:39


TCL Electronics launches its first-ever 8K TV
Posted 17-Jun-2019 15:18


E-scooter share scheme launches in Wellington
Posted 17-Jun-2019 12:34


Anyone can broadcast with Kordia Pop Up TV
Posted 13-Jun-2019 10:51


Volvo and Uber present production vehicle ready for self-driving
Posted 13-Jun-2019 10:47


100,000 customers connected to fibre broadband network through Enable
Posted 13-Jun-2019 10:35


5G uptake even faster than expected
Posted 12-Jun-2019 10:01


Xbox showcases 60 anticipated games
Posted 10-Jun-2019 20:24


Trend Micro Turns Public Hotspots into Secure Networks with WiFi Protection for Mobile Devices
Posted 5-Jun-2019 13:24


Bold UK spinoff for beauty software company Flossie
Posted 2-Jun-2019 14:10


Amazon Introduces Echo Show 5
Posted 1-Jun-2019 15:32


Epson launches new 4K Pro-UHD projector technology
Posted 1-Jun-2019 15:26


Lenovo and Qualcomm unveil first 5G PC called Project Limitless
Posted 28-May-2019 20:23


Intel introduces new 10th Gen Intel Core Processors and Project Athena
Posted 28-May-2019 19:28


Orcon first to trial residential 10Gbps broadband
Posted 28-May-2019 11:20



Geekzone Live »

Try automatic live updates from Geekzone directly in your browser, without refreshing the page, with Geekzone Live now.


Support Geekzone »

Our community of supporters help make Geekzone possible. Click the button below to join them.

Support Geezone on PressPatron



Are you subscribed to our RSS feed? You can download the latest headlines and summaries from our stories directly to your computer or smartphone by using a feed reader.

Alternatively, you can receive a daily email with Geekzone updates.