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  # 1771396 27-Apr-2017 15:58
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mattwnz:

 

2700k leds are very orange, far more so than just a normal incandesent light. 3000k warm white tends to produce a better light.  If you go to mitre 10 they have a range. Orbit brand do them.

 

 

I saw them, I didn't know if Orbit was a good brand.

 

 

 

richms:

 

2700k is about what a long life 1000 hour incandesent light puts out. 3000k is what a proper halogen will do. The big benifit of halogen other than long life and efficiency and small light source was its better colour temperature, so not sure why the desire to go backwards.

 

 

Wife wants them, just because the 3000K LEDs are whiter than the old GE CFL.

 

 

 

huckster:

 

Just been in Mitre10 Mega Albany for something else so passed by the lighting section and they had some warm 13W GE LED Dimmable. 2700k and 1060 lumens.

 

Can't find them on the Mitre 10 website though and the GE site isn't very helpful either.

 

Pretty sure they were A19.

 

 

GE's a great brand for lighting, I'll check them out thanks. I did look in M10 on the weekend but didn't notice any 2700K LED GE.


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  # 1771405 27-Apr-2017 16:12
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For a premium brand, I wouldn't go past Philips. I have got several that are over 3 years old, and are on a lot, and never had any fail yet. But not sure on availability of their 2700k bulbs, and they dod cost more. Panasonic I have also found to be good. I also have a cheap brand I got from the warehouse about 4 years ago, and it still works perfectly, and produces a nice coloured light.


 
 
 
 


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  # 1771438 27-Apr-2017 17:14
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mattwnz:

 

richms:

 

2700k is about what a long life 1000 hour incandesent light puts out. 3000k is what a proper halogen will do. The big benifit of halogen other than long life and efficiency and small light source was its better colour temperature, so not sure why the desire to go backwards.

 

 

 

 

In theory they should be. But not sure how well colour matched the models being sold in NZ are. I have compared a 2700k LED E27 I have got in a table lamp, vs a normal 60W incandescent, and the incandescent is definitely a whiter , less orange light. The 3000k is a better match I have found, although the 3000k is a bit of a whiter light. But lighting professionals I have spoken to have said they would only use 3000k in houses. Many stores sell 4000k in bathrooms, which they say produces a better light colour for putting on makeup etc, but I think it is too much of a cold light.

 

 

The problem with incandesent and halogen lights is that their output and colour is hugely dependant on line voltage, since that can vary so much then if you were at a period of high voltage and compare to a fixed LED, then yeah it would be quite white, and low voltage makes them very orange. Dim them down furthur and they start to lack any connection to white and are just a dull orange.





Richard rich.ms

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  # 1771449 27-Apr-2017 17:43
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I bought some cheap bulbs just to see what they look like. These are supposed to be standard replacement bulbs but what strikes me is that the light spread seems to be much less than with the CFLs. Everyone here keeps talking about colour and brightness, but what about beam angle? I can only find references to that in regard to spots, but it also seems to be an issue with the regular bulbs I just bought. Adequate light directly beneath them, but very noticeably dimmer off to the sides.

 

 





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  # 1771459 27-Apr-2017 17:56
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GE stick ones at mitre10 come the closest I have found to a sideways spread and less upwards, e27 and b22 only tho, and most table lamps I have are e14 where they are needed.

 

 





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  # 1771466 27-Apr-2017 18:06
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Beam angle's a good point. The CFL spirals probably throw light fairly generally, whereas LED is more directional.

 

We have multiple light fittings per room, so we should be ok, but each fitting is slightly directional. 


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  # 1771480 27-Apr-2017 18:46
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Beam angle is definitely a factor to consider even with standard shaped LED bulbs as they are more directional than an incandescent or CFL, but it is usually mentioned in the specs of the bulb (at least it has been for the ones I've looked at).

It's a pretty wide angle usually so fine for downward facing ceiling lights.

 
 
 
 


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  # 1771486 27-Apr-2017 19:03
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Rikkitic:

 

I bought some cheap bulbs just to see what they look like. These are supposed to be standard replacement bulbs but what strikes me is that the light spread seems to be much less than with the CFLs. Everyone here keeps talking about colour and brightness, but what about beam angle? I can only find references to that in regard to spots, but it also seems to be an issue with the regular bulbs I just bought. Adequate light directly beneath them, but very noticeably dimmer off to the sides.

 

 

 

 

 

 

It all really depends on how you use them I found putting them in downlighters, you can get more light than CFLs, as it is more directed down. 


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  # 1771599 27-Apr-2017 22:16
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I have installed a large number of Orbit 2700K bulbs in our house and my wife has been very happy with them, and she is very sensitive to colour temperature. I have had 2 bulbs fail, and they were both in the bathroom, so I don't think they like steam very much. All the other ones have been fine. At one point you could get 2 for $12 on special!

 

My recommendation is to buy one or two and see what you think. I decided that even if they were slightly less reliable, the colour output was great, and I try very hard to avoid 3000K except for work areas.


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  # 1771621 28-Apr-2017 00:08
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PJ48:

 

I have installed a large number of Orbit 2700K bulbs in our house and my wife has been very happy with them, and she is very sensitive to colour temperature. I have had 2 bulbs fail, and they were both in the bathroom, so I don't think they like steam very much. All the other ones have been fine. At one point you could get 2 for $12 on special!

 

My recommendation is to buy one or two and see what you think. I decided that even if they were slightly less reliable, the colour output was great, and I try very hard to avoid 3000K except for work areas.

 

 

 

 

You do actually see a lot of places that have the 4000k ones installed, so you maybe confusing them with those, as 2700k vs 3000k shouldn't be a huge colour difference. But 3000k to 4000k is a very stark difference. Here is quite a good discussion about the colour differences, and some people find the 2700k ones can change colours of paint. http://ths.gardenweb.com/discussions/3699370/2700-vs-3000k-for-kitchen-lighting 




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  # 1771628 28-Apr-2017 05:44
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The Orbit bulbs were three for $9 at miter ten last weekend, super cheap. Compare that to Panasonic / Philips at more like $15 each, that's why I was concerned about quality.

 

Funny thing about color temperature, the closer you go to the lower end the more difference a change makes. 2700K to 3000K is probably much more visible to most people than 5000K to 6000K. I find the same thing doing RAW photo correction.


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  # 1771907 28-Apr-2017 14:38
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I haven't read the entire thread, but have been looking at lighting and bulbs as I'm 1/2 way through a kitchen / dining renovation.

 

Local Mitre 10 Mega has stock of Philips 10.5W 3000K bulbs, either B22 or E27, standard size, they look reasonably omnidirectional (ie the glass globe part goes around about 270deg, not like many of the cheapies which have a half-dome 180 deg).  They are 1055 lumen, also dimmable - so @10.5W are just over the usual 10W minimum spec for dimmers.  I expect they probably work with cheap leading edge dimmers (ie $27 Goldair or $17 as insert into faceplate only) as the other recent Philips dimmable bulbs I've bought work perfectly (without the expense of an expensive ~$100 trailing-edge dimmer).

 

Not exactly what was wanted as they're slightly below 11W / 1100 lumen and a bit cooler than 2700K - but I couldn't find anything brighter in a standard LED globe that wasn't bright white (5000K etc).  They have a pretty wide selection of LEDs at my local Mitre 10 Mega.  The brightest 2700K Philips bulbs were 7W / ~700 lumen (somewhere around 60W incandescent equivalent)

 

IIRC, they were about $11 each, which is what the supermarket seem to charge for much lower spec Philips and Panasonic bulbs.


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  # 1772004 28-Apr-2017 16:18
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Fred99:

 

I haven't read the entire thread, but have been looking at lighting and bulbs as I'm 1/2 way through a kitchen / dining renovation.

 

Local Mitre 10 Mega has stock of Philips 10.5W 3000K bulbs, either B22 or E27, standard size, they look reasonably omnidirectional (ie the glass globe part goes around about 270deg, not like many of the cheapies which have a half-dome 180 deg).  They are 1055 lumen, also dimmable - so @10.5W are just over the usual 10W minimum spec for dimmers.  I expect they probably work with cheap leading edge dimmers (ie $27 Goldair or $17 as insert into faceplate only) as the other recent Philips dimmable bulbs I've bought work perfectly (without the expense of an expensive ~$100 trailing-edge dimmer).

 

Not exactly what was wanted as they're slightly below 11W / 1100 lumen and a bit cooler than 2700K - but I couldn't find anything brighter in a standard LED globe that wasn't bright white (5000K etc).  They have a pretty wide selection of LEDs at my local Mitre 10 Mega.  The brightest 2700K Philips bulbs were 7W / ~700 lumen (somewhere around 60W incandescent equivalent)

 

IIRC, they were about $11 each, which is what the supermarket seem to charge for much lower spec Philips and Panasonic bulbs.

 

 

@Fredd99 I linked the below ones earlier in the thread. From the Philips NZ site these are warmer than the 3000K, but are still 1055 lumens. Not sure where they are stocked though.

 

http://www.lighting.philips.co.nz/prof/led-lamps-and-systems/led-lamps/master-ledbulb/929001200502_EU/product

 

 

 

Most will say what the beam angle is on the packaging, don't make assumptions based the shape of the bulb. If you're talking about the bulbs I think you are, the beam angle is actually 150 degrees according to Philips.

 

http://www.lighting.philips.co.nz/prof/led-lamps-and-systems/led-lamps/ledlamps/929001162349_EU/product

 

 


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  # 1772063 28-Apr-2017 17:37
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Paul1977:

 

Fred99:

 

I haven't read the entire thread, but have been looking at lighting and bulbs as I'm 1/2 way through a kitchen / dining renovation.

 

Local Mitre 10 Mega has stock of Philips 10.5W 3000K bulbs, either B22 or E27, standard size, they look reasonably omnidirectional (ie the glass globe part goes around about 270deg, not like many of the cheapies which have a half-dome 180 deg).  They are 1055 lumen, also dimmable - so @10.5W are just over the usual 10W minimum spec for dimmers.  I expect they probably work with cheap leading edge dimmers (ie $27 Goldair or $17 as insert into faceplate only) as the other recent Philips dimmable bulbs I've bought work perfectly (without the expense of an expensive ~$100 trailing-edge dimmer).

 

Not exactly what was wanted as they're slightly below 11W / 1100 lumen and a bit cooler than 2700K - but I couldn't find anything brighter in a standard LED globe that wasn't bright white (5000K etc).  They have a pretty wide selection of LEDs at my local Mitre 10 Mega.  The brightest 2700K Philips bulbs were 7W / ~700 lumen (somewhere around 60W incandescent equivalent)

 

IIRC, they were about $11 each, which is what the supermarket seem to charge for much lower spec Philips and Panasonic bulbs.

 

 

@Fredd99 I linked the below ones earlier in the thread. From the Philips NZ site these are warmer than the 3000K, but are still 1055 lumens. Not sure where they are stocked though.

 

http://www.lighting.philips.co.nz/prof/led-lamps-and-systems/led-lamps/master-ledbulb/929001200502_EU/product

 

 

 

Most will say what the beam angle is on the packaging, don't make assumptions based the shape of the bulb. If you're talking about the bulbs I think you are, the beam angle is actually 150 degrees according to Philips.

 

http://www.lighting.philips.co.nz/prof/led-lamps-and-systems/led-lamps/ledlamps/929001162349_EU/product

 

 

 

 

No - not those ones which those aren't dimmable, and yes I get you about beam angle, but you can be pretty sure from the appearance that one with a hemispherical bulb isn't going to be very omnidirectional - even if the reverse of that does not apply.

 

The ones I was looking at aren't on the Mitre 10 website, but they were in store. I just searched the Philips NZ website - and they aren't there - which is very annoying.

 

Beam angle isn't stated as a single figure in the first one you linked above, but it's closer to what I'd consider an acceptable (as incandescent replacement) based on the luminance diagram.

 

Now I'm very annoyed - as the first ones you linked to look interesting, and I have no idea where I could see one...

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


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  # 1772190 28-Apr-2017 22:44
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Our 1990's house is full of R80 downlights. I found the Philips 3000K lights good for utility areas but too stark for bedroom and living areas. Eventually I found Osram brand 2700K 9W at a specialty lighting shop. They are definitely warmer than the Philips ones and we find them very good, running about 12 months now with no issues.

 

Aside: CFL downlights proved very unreliable due to the electronics being in the hotspot at the top, also the long warm up time was very annoying.


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