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# 214722 25-May-2017 13:35
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So with the recent Chlorination starting in lower hutt, we're sick of the water already.  Started looking at an under bench chlorine system for drinking only before deciding that it makes more sense to do the entire house.

 

I've found the Puretec WH2-60 system which is a carbon based whole house filtration.  Davey seems to be another brand bandied about, but they seem to be more pick and mix on filters.

 

I don't think I need a UV based system, figuring that we should let Wellington Water deal with that.  But has any one looked at these?

 

 





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  # 1788115 25-May-2017 13:44
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Do you really need to filter the water that goes into the shower and toilet? That's bulk use and could mean filters get changed more often than would otherwise be required. Worth considering anyway.




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  # 1788117 25-May-2017 13:49
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timmmay:

 

Do you really need to filter the water that goes into the shower and toilet? That's bulk use and could mean filters get changed more often than would otherwise be required. Worth considering anyway.

 

 

the toilet no, but that's hard to seperate out.  And after having the door shut when running a bath for my son and opening the door to the wafting overpowering smell of chlorine, is why we decided that we'd like it on the shower/bath also.  Showers you can do with a shower filter but bath no...neither the washing machine.





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  # 1788122 25-May-2017 13:58
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We are 'rural' with house on rain water supply.  Have whole house filtering (80 > 20 > 1um) and UV disinfection.  Installed 5 yrs ago when we bought the house.  Works fine but there is ongoing maintenance and cost.  20 & 1 um filters cost ~$30 and UV lamp ~$100 (all wholesale) and all + GST.

 

Personally would not be bothering if I was on town supply.  Perhaps just a 1um filter.  Currently not activated carbon filters but may change the 20 & 1 um filters to activated carbon when need to buy more.


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  # 1788124 25-May-2017 14:04
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You don't need UV if the water has chlorine in it.  UV kills bugs.  If you can taste/smell the chlorine it's unlikely to have any live bugs in it.

 

Just be aware that if you carbon filter the chlorine out of your water, there is nothing in their to deal with any bugs that may grow in your pipes, cylinder etc. 

 

A number of algae really like the output end of carbon filters as a growing environment.

 

I'd research the replacement cost of the filter before you go ahead and install. 

 

The point of use carbon filter at our fridge needs replacing about every 2 years.  That's in Nelson where the quality of water is very good to start with.  You only taste chlorine if they bump the concentration up during heavy rain

 

 

 

 





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  # 1788457 26-May-2017 00:12

Check the flow rates that the filter cartridges support. Activated carbon filters often only support quite low flow rates. Also more flow = less filtration quality for a given filter. And get a carbon filter that has a KDF stage as well. Removes heavy metals and helps to stop bugs from growing in the filter.

 

Also consider just getting a rainwater system installed. Especially worthwhile if your council supplied water is "hard" water. Soap, shampoo ect work better, make more bubbles and rinse out easier with rainwater. Even just having a water tank that is filled by the council water will reduce the chlorine levels alot as it will be able to evaporate out.






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  # 1788553 26-May-2017 09:26
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Have been using filters for over 20 years.

 

Also using water tester (mainly for drinking water).

 

In Moscow we had rust in the water (tubes are iron) - hence one cotton thread filter was filtering all water - mainly to protect everything including laundry from rust.

 

We still use big cotton filter for washing machine here in Auckland so white cloth stay white.

 

For drinking/cooking needs we have used before and still use here 3 step Instapure Filters - which includes carbon filter as the third stage. Water is relatively good. No Chlorine odor. PPM water meter shows the difference.

 

In places like Onehunga in Auckland where we helped to install same system to friends - water is from aquifers - in one year first stage was clogged with something black similar to tar perhaps from the pumping systems.

 

 


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  # 1788576 26-May-2017 10:00
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Personally I'd suggest doing your drinking water.  As above, in town opt for a GAC/KDF underbench filter and ensure it's installed with a pressure limiting valve ahead of it.  You have no comeback if they burst and you don't have one installed to protect the cartridge.

 

Filtering to 1 micron will protect you from cysts such as giardia.  Chlorine will have taken care of any bacteria.  As above, once you've removed the chlorine, you're back to unprotected water status, so make sure your hot water cyclinder is turned up high enough.

 

As for whole house, yes you can do this, but it will be expensive.  You can't recharge carbon filters, and you'll be replacing big ones of these.  Personally I'd consider stepping up to a more industrial solution if I was going to do this, where you fill a tank with carbon granules, rather than buy cartridges.

 

Carbon will remove the smell of chlorine.  You don't want to remove the smell of tank water, as you'll be masking the decomposing opossum in the rain water tank, but it is useful to remove any pesticides etc that may have landed on your roof/catchment area.  KDF is not for rain water supplies, but is useful in town supplies, where it helps to prevent bacteria growth.  You'll also see silver treated carbon for the same reason.

 

 

 

There's nothing wrong as such with chlorine, ask the people in Hawkes Bay...

 

But it does smell. 

 

 

 

My $0.02 ? 

 

I'd suck it up and filter the drinking water only, leaving the rest of my house protected by the residual Chlorine present in the treated water supply. 


 
 
 
 


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  # 1790441 27-May-2017 23:46

RUKI:

 

Have been using filters for over 20 years.

 

Also using water tester (mainly for drinking water).

 

In Moscow we had rust in the water (tubes are iron) - hence one cotton thread filter was filtering all water - mainly to protect everything including laundry from rust.

 

We still use big cotton filter for washing machine here in Auckland so white cloth stay white.

 

For drinking/cooking needs we have used before and still use here 3 step Instapure Filters - which includes carbon filter as the third stage. Water is relatively good. No Chlorine odor. PPM water meter shows the difference.

 

In places like Onehunga in Auckland where we helped to install same system to friends - water is from aquifers - in one year first stage was clogged with something black similar to tar perhaps from the pumping systems.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Lots of the council pipes in Auckland are still iron and steel pipes. And even for brand new large diameter pipes they install cement lined steel pipes. Instead of plastic pipes. This means they have to increase the PH and the mineral content of the water to make them last longer.

 

As for the black stuff in the water supply, that is caused by the water containing iron, which is in a form that can't be removed by sediment filters. But when you add chlorine, it reacts and forms that black gunge. Which can be removed by sediment filters. Problem is that Watercare use the sediment filter process first, then add the chlorine. Meaning black gunge in the outgoing supply. The are too cheap to add an initial dose of chlorine to the water before it goes through their sediment filters. Meaning the iron never gets removed properly.

 

Watercare also have their own "cabinets" dotted around the streets, which measure residual chlorine levels and colour of the water. But the iron issue means that they have to dose far more chlorine at the treatment stations to counteract the chlorine being "used up" by the iron. So no wonder the water stinks of chlorine.






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  # 2019770 21-May-2018 13:19
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With the Christchurch supply now having chlorine added, we are finding it very strong at our house so are now looking at a whole house filtration system.

 

Interested in recommendations.

 

We were initially looking at a Puretec WH2-60 like the OP, but I was just at a supplier today asking some questions and they seemed to think that the sediment filter was would not me required in Chch and recommended a Puretec LD1025K instead. Unfortunately I can't find much info relating to this one.

 

I'm not married to the idea of Puretec brand, they just happened to be the ones I looked at.

 

Interested in what others are using and how they are performing (especially if in Chch).




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  # 2019793 21-May-2018 13:54
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Lower hutt isn't supposed to need a sediment filter either, but holy crap you should have seen it when I replaced it early this year.....disgusting.

 

 





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  # 2019801 21-May-2018 14:16
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davidcole:

 

Lower hutt isn't supposed to need a sediment filter either, but holy crap you should have seen it when I replaced it early this year.....disgusting.

 

 

Well, that's certainly interesting to hear.


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  # 2019804 21-May-2018 14:21
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RUKI:

 

In places like Onehunga in Auckland where we helped to install same system to friends - water is from aquifers - in one year first stage was clogged with something black similar to tar perhaps from the pumping systems.

 

 

That could be manganese-dioxide.  Chlorination of water containing manganese can cause precipitation of it.  Looks awful and was a PITA in a place I worked because it stained stainless steel over time.





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  # 2019847 21-May-2018 14:51
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We distill our drinking water using a USA-made Waterwise (locally rebranded as Pure Magic). It's the best method but takes time and uses electricity.

 

We don't bother filtering water used for anything else.





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  # 2019891 21-May-2018 15:25
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MichaelNZ:

 

We distill our drinking water using a USA-made Waterwise (locally rebranded as Pure Magic). It's the best method but takes time and uses electricity.

 

We don't bother filtering water used for anything else.

 

 

We want it simple, turn on the tap - get good water.

 

We also want all water filtered (all indoor water any way), not just drinking water.

 

I can't overstate how horribly strong the chlorine is in the water at our house.




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  # 2019909 21-May-2018 15:41
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Paul1977:

 

MichaelNZ:

 

We distill our drinking water using a USA-made Waterwise (locally rebranded as Pure Magic). It's the best method but takes time and uses electricity.

 

We don't bother filtering water used for anything else.

 

 

We want it simple, turn on the tap - get good water.

 

We also want all water filtered (all indoor water any way), not just drinking water.

 

I can't overstate how horribly strong the chlorine is in the water at our house.

 

 

Try running a bath, it's like being at a public swimming pool.





Previously known as psycik

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