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194 posts

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# 214732 25-May-2017 18:39
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just moved and have lawn (15x8m) for the first time in a very long time

 

I'm looking at going the Ryobi plus system as I need to replace items soon such as a drill etc.
Ideally I would like to stay with the 18v products as it simplifies using the same battery's across the range of products.

 

What I would like to know is other peoples experiences to date.

 

The reasons I'm looking at electric cordless is
A. SWMBO must find it easy
B. now screwing around with mixing (or draining/changing oil) - see point A
C. SWMBO has ruled out corded electric

 

 

 

Questions I have are.
1. How are people finding durability of the frame in regards to occasional stones hitting the plastic casing etc
2. can larger batteries be fitted eg a 5.0 Ah battery.
3. how often are you replacing batteries and blades for a given lawn size
4. Is there any real benefit going from 18v to a 36v mower - the 36v stuff is mainly garden tools but in reality 70% of my future tools will be 18V orientated (drills etc)
5. How does the 18v mower handle longer (or wet) grass - anything to be aware of

 

 

 

thanks in advance

 

 

 

 

 


  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


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  # 1788340 25-May-2017 19:47
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When I looked they had one that took 2 18v packs so was as powerful as the 36v ones but didnt need specific batteries. Didnt go ahead with it since I was not sure if it would cope with long grass from infrequent mowing so just got my petrol one repaired which wasnt as expensive as I feared.





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  # 1788347 25-May-2017 19:56
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I was going to say the One+ / 18V ones are super expensive if you don't have the batteries already, since that is what put me off when I was looking a year or so ago. I've just checked at Bunnings though and they seem to have a one battery combo for around $500, which is a good $300 less than when I priced it up at the time. 

 

I ended up going with the plug in Ryobi one for $300. Seems fine, cuts the grass okay but there is a lot of plastic in it (including the blades). I actually kinda hope I manage to smash it and can then redeploy the motor elsewhere. The battery ones are almost identical, but are much heavier than the plug in version.


 
 
 
 


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  # 1788354 25-May-2017 20:24
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And actually answering some of your specific queries that seem common to both plug in and battery versions:

 

(1) I haven't managed to crack/smash it yet, but the blades are definitely pretty nicked

 

(5) It's hopeless with wet grass. It clogs up the exit channel and you have to reach in manually to clear it.

 

 


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  # 1788381 25-May-2017 21:00
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They seem to have good reviews (no lawn mower is great on wet grass) and I'll be buying one to replace the annoying petrol mower. 

 

Getting fuel for the petrol POS is annoying as I have to either get heaps, or time it to when I need fuel for the car. And the Mrs wont do it coz she drives a diesel. :/

 

 

 

I already have ryobi one+ gear including

 

weedeater

 

hammer drill

 

angle grinder

 

impact gun

 

circular saw

 

chainsaw

 

blower

 

hedge trimmer

 

torch

 

LED worklight is coming next, then the lawn mower.

 

 

 

I'm pretty sure I've forgotten something, but it's dark and cold outside.


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  # 1788383 25-May-2017 21:01
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Don't expect Bunnings (if that's where you're buying it) to carry spares.

 

I don't own one but my thoughts would be so long as you mow regularly and don't let the grass get long you'll be happy with it. Also mow when the grass is as dry as possible, i.e. not right after it's rained, nor early in the day when there's still plenty of dew on the grass.





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  # 1788590 26-May-2017 10:12
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I bought a cordless electric mower a while back. I didn't want to spend *too* much on what I saw as an experiment, and something that will likely be obsolete anyway before it is worn out.

 

So I didn't buy a Ryobi; the price was ridiculously high by the time you factor in batteries and chargers. Maybe it's not so bad if you already have those, or plan to buy other (expensive) Ryobi tools.

 

I bought a Worx, which uses a 24V Sealed Lead Acid battery... older proven technology, and quite a bit cheaper (although still more expensive than a Warehouse 4-stroke).

 

For me it's a success despite:

 

1. Long wet grass clogs the quite small exit chute

 

2. Long wet grass means I can't mow the lawn (small -- 1/8 acre, largish house, 3 garages, large gardens) in one go.

 

3. Recharging takes several hours.

 

4. Lightweight/flimsy construction.

 

5. Small cut width and catcher

 

6. The first 5 minutes, I ran over a stone which broke the plastic body.

 

 

 

Benefits (compared to a cheap 4-stroke) are:

 

1. You can repair the body with epoxy. :)

 

2. Easy starting

 

3. No maintenance/tuning.

 

4. Light weight makes for easy pushing.

 

5. No rust/corrosion issues (but maybe plastic degradation from UV?)

 

6. Quieter. Although not as quiet as I expected.

 

7. No trips to the petrol station for fuel.

 

 


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  # 1788599 26-May-2017 10:28
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frankv:

 

I bought a cordless electric mower a while back. I didn't want to spend *too* much on what I saw as an experiment, and something that will likely be obsolete anyway before it is worn out.

 

So I didn't buy a Ryobi; the price was ridiculously high by the time you factor in batteries and chargers. Maybe it's not so bad if you already have those, or plan to buy other (expensive) Ryobi tools.

 

 

Not sure I would class ryobi tools as expensive. They seem to be great value IMO. Expensive are ones that tradies use for the warranty.

 

 





Richard rich.ms

 
 
 
 


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  # 1788679 26-May-2017 12:13
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I have one of the Ryobi one plus mowers and a larger lawn.  With 2 x 5ah batteries I don't quite finish the lawn, but I also have 2 x 4ah batteries and a lot of other Ryobi tools.

 

t's not super powerful but it has enough power.  I've gone 6 weeks without mowing and just had to raise it to level three to do a smaller section that grows fast and then go back over on the normal one (lowest) setting.

 

Not sure about durability, I've had mine 8 months.  Have certainly chewed up some stones and heavy branches without any major concerns.

 

Overall I'd definitely buy one again.  had thought about going corded but very glad I went with the cordless version.

 

P.S.  I've never used the catcher, always mulch and it leaves very little behind, normally unnoticeable.


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  # 1788757 26-May-2017 14:09
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Hi,

 

I've have the 18V One+ Lawnmower for a couple of years.... I have run over kerbing, stumps, stones etc and there haven't been any issues with the plastic.

 

I use the 5.0Ah batteries and would recommend them! The batteries last long enough to do my lawn (probably about the same size as yours) and then have enough to finish off with the weedeater. I haven't replaced the blades yet but am considering giving them a sharpen, as for the batteries I have had to replace two of the old 2.4Ah batteries after 5 years of use (in other tools).

 

The 36V and 18V lawnmowers are exactly the same apart from the battery slots, really depends if you want other 36v gardening tools, I went with 18V as I have the rest of the set.

 

Wet grass is a problem with any mower, it can't throw if far enough into the catcher, I get around that by moving on a high, then lower setting.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


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  # 1788769 26-May-2017 14:30
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Consumer did a review on electric lawnmowers quite recently so that maybe worth reading.




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  # 1788806 26-May-2017 15:34
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Thanks all - some really good comments.

 

The reality is I'm about to "buy" into an eco system of tools anyway so in regards to cost Ryobi tools are generally on par with other similar mainstream brands.
I did see the Worx models at Mitre10 and for the same price (as Ryobi - $499) it is a higher voltage but in terms of an eco system of swapping batteries between tools its a bit limited.

 

The only concern I have is Bunnings seem to be the only supplier in NZ so pretty much stuck with their pricing.  Do any other places (in NZ) sell the Ryobi power tools.

I have seen the dual 18v battery Ryobi mower.  I think it was called Fusion.  Its available overseas but I don't think you can get them in Aus/NZ anymore. 
Has anyone recently seen the dual battery model?  

I should have been clearer on the wet grass comment - should have said mildly damp or something, but thanks for the replies.

 

 

 

 

 

 


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  # 1788809 26-May-2017 15:38
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You're stuck with Bunnings only unfortunately.  The other avenues are Trademe and sometimes you can get bare tools on Amazon and / or ebay that are a little cheaper, or some things like the chainsaw that you can't get in NZ.


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  # 1788845 26-May-2017 16:57
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40v is 36v with the BS factor applied. Its funny how some brands (dewilt, black and decker) retain the non BS 18 and 54v ratings here, but call them 20 and 60v max in the USA.

 

The attraction with ryobi is that the battery is so common, must be millions of them out there, and they are sticking with it. House brands like worx will be a one time deal, you will end up with it being like my last 2 ozito drills where battery craps out, replacement ends up being more than the drill cost.

 

You can get a chainsaw now, its brushless. I got one because I really CBF dragging out 3 power cables to trim some trees at the back of the yard. I have a 230v chainsaw and also the 230v weedwhacker with the pole saw attachment, but really the cable is the biggest hassle for those. I did put the generator in the wheelbarrow once to get around the cable problem.





Richard rich.ms

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  # 1788857 26-May-2017 17:32
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I was going to get an electric mower as our lawns are not huge and landscaped on different levels, did require some lifting and most petrol mowers were quite heavy.  I'd have considered the Ryobi if I'd had other Ryobi tools, but all my 18v battery tools are Milwaukee, and I doubt they'll ever make an 18v lawnmower (or if they did - it would be expensive).

 

I'd used a push mower for years which was due for replacement.  Relented and bought a cheap "Morrison" 4 stroke rotary mower, about $300 on special (normally about $400?) with B&S 125cc motor about 2 years ago. Pressed steel which is lightweight and no doubt will eventually rust out, but so far it's started first pull every time, is relatively quiet, very easy to adjust cut height, cuts wet grass reasonably well - it's far exceeded my expectations.

 

Mentioning this because comments I was getting was that you "must have" alloy chassis, be premium brand etc etc - yet if I was to buy again knowing what I do now, I'd buy exactly the same mower again.


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  # 1788872 26-May-2017 18:12
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Fred99:

 

I was going to get an electric mower as our lawns are not huge and landscaped on different levels, did require some lifting and most petrol mowers were quite heavy.  I'd have considered the Ryobi if I'd had other Ryobi tools, but all my 18v battery tools are Milwaukee, and I doubt they'll ever make an 18v lawnmower (or if they did - it would be expensive).

 

 

They have a weed whacker now, and its got a proper end on it not like the toy ryobi ones that only have one string and dispense more everytime you let your finger off the power and it slows down. Wouldnt suprise me if they make a mower sometime.





Richard rich.ms

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