Geekzone: technology news, blogs, forums
Guest
Welcome Guest.
You haven't logged in yet. If you don't have an account you can register now.


View this topic in a long page with up to 500 replies per page Create new topic
1 | 2 | 3 
1725 posts

Uber Geek

Trusted
Lifetime subscriber

  # 2024027 28-May-2018 16:39
2 people support this post
Send private message

shanek:

 

I have a number of the SONOFF devices running and find them of very good quality, i thought i would look into the certification of them and think it would cost around 2K to get them certified for use here in NZ and am confident they would be certified as they are certified in other countries for use.

 

I looked on the worksafe site https://worksafe.govt.nz/topic-and-industry/electricity/appliances-and-fittings/high-and-medium-risk-products/medium-risk-product-list/supplier-declaration-of-conformity/ and called them to clarify a few things around process and was interested in their response so thought i would share here.  And yes i know everyone will have their opposing opinion but this is what i was told.

 

An SDOC is required if you want to import and sell these devices to people, If you want to import them for your personal use in your own house then a SDOC is not required.

 

I questioned the person at worksafe on this and she said it was up to the installing electrician to decide if they looked safe, i pointed out that law in New Zealand does not require you to get an electrician to replace a light switch and even the work safe website states this.  They called me back later and said as long as my electrician was happy with it then i was fine which again i pointed out to replace a light switch did not require an electrician.

 

 

I think an important piece has been left out here, under the exemption for home owners, you could replace the light switch with another, you could not replace someone else's.

 

Most electricians are wary of been asked to install customer supplied gear, some couldn't care less and those are the ones you need to watch out for, the word cowboy come to mind...

 

Having a SDOC allows the installing electrician to legally take this SDOC at face value and assume it is safe to install and use and should the item prove to not be safe then they avoid liability.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I ended up calling my insurance company and explained this all to them and they seem OK with me installing these fittings in my house and they are the people who really matter after all.

 

If however there are a group of people on this site that would like the T1,2,3 Sonoff light switches certified i would be prepared to front it and we can all share the costs to get them certified as it may only cost $100 each if there are a few of us and then we can all use them without this hassle.

 

 

Check out if a SDOC has been issued in Australia as you may be able to save yourself a bunch of money and use that SDOC.

 

 

 

There would be some "Got you's" you would need to make sure that you have a neutral at the light switch, 80's and earlier houses, it was typical to not have neutrals at the light switches. If you using one of the basic units (or similar) you would be making alteration to your wiring, in this case you would need an Electrical inspector (not an electrician) to sign off the COC before turning the power back on.

 

 

 

 

 

 


2 posts

Wannabe Geek


  # 2089347 12-Sep-2018 14:49
Send private message

Wondering if anyone has made any progress on completing an SDOC for importing the Sonoff T1 series of switches. I would be interested in partnering up with some people to get this to go through testing locally if need be. I have approached ITead about getting CCC in China (which would be sufficient) but no response yet.


 
 
 
 


282 posts

Ultimate Geek


  # 2130214 20-Nov-2018 13:20
One person supports this post
Send private message

It's really unfortunate NZ follows the Australian standards, which pretty much rule out many electrical devices from being legally sold here, or if sold, at a higher price to cover certification cost.  The bulk of the worlds electronics are certainly not made here!  Looking at my electronics, such as Laptops and power supplies, smart home equipment, battery chargers etc, I don't see a lot of NZ certifications there.  

 

I'm surprised that EU/CE standards are not sufficient legally but perhaps there are devices that pass EU/CE standards but fail Australian standards?  Would be very interested to hear an example of that.

 

 


19 posts

Geek


  # 2130251 20-Nov-2018 13:37
Send private message

Yes a small group of us got together to go through the process of getting an SDOC, we paid a testing company $350 to assess it, they then wanted another $350 for some other paper work and $2000 to complete the testing needed to comply in NZ as the Itead testing didnt have the full set needed in NZ/AU.  We pulled out at this stage but if there is a larger group who want to chip in then we could move it forward.

 

This was to certify T1, T2, T3, switches.

 

 

 

 


588 posts

Ultimate Geek
Inactive user


  # 2131231 21-Nov-2018 17:59
Send private message

shanek:

 

Yes a small group of us got together to go through the process of getting an SDOC, we paid a testing company $350 to assess it, they then wanted another $350 for some other paper work and $2000 to complete the testing needed to comply in NZ as the Itead testing didnt have the full set needed in NZ/AU.  We pulled out at this stage but if there is a larger group who want to chip in then we could move it forward.

 

This was to certify T1, T2, T3, switches.

 

 

The testing company doesn't give you the SDoC.

 

Any "supplier" (importer, distributor, you etc) can/must make a "Supplier Declaration of Conformity" (you're simply declaring that you genuinely believe the product meets NZ standards).

 

Obviously in order to make that kind of declaration lawfully and in good-faith you need some evidence to backup your claim that it does in fact meet the standards; either that you have tested it to a particular test standard, or (if necessary as per the risk category) it has been independently tested by an accredited lab. 

 

The test lab will only supply a report stating that they believe the product does/doesn't meet any particular standard (and TBH $2,700 is a pretty reasonable price for 3x different units) - you will still need to take that report and produce your own SDoC as the "supplier".

 

Alternatively you can ask the manufacturer for their test report (which they should already have) and use that as the basis for your SDoC - after taking reasonable steps to ensure the model you imported is identical to the one listed in the report (comparing/testing critical components etc).


19 posts

Geek


  # 2131305 21-Nov-2018 21:42
Send private message

Yes appreciate that and this is what we were doing.  And FYI some testing places do issue an SDOC as we did go through this process and if testing was completed and they complied we would have received the SDOC.

 

There is a company in AU at the moment getting SONOFF devices certified for AU so will also meet the NZ standards.

 

 


588 posts

Ultimate Geek
Inactive user


  # 2131355 21-Nov-2018 23:30
Send private message

As mentioned an accredited test lab will issue a test report / certificate of conformity however they can't issue an SDoC if they're not the supplier.

The reason is the supplier takes responsibility for ensuring continued compliance on all supplied units which may involve specific per unit testing as stipulated as a condition of the test report (as per the requirement of the test standard). If you're also outsourcing this import/QA work to your test lab then they may be in a position to provide an SDoC... but may raise some issues around independence.

As an example we had a similar situation importing large electrical equipment with no certifications. We paid (>$30k) to have it tested in NZ & AU (which involved changing some sub-components) and report produced. We had to check each unit complied with the test report (same design / required modifications) and carry out particular testing (HiPot etc) on 100% of units. We supplied the SDoC on this basis.

 
 
 
 


'That VDSL Cat'
11195 posts

Uber Geek

Trusted
Spark
Subscriber

  # 2131362 22-Nov-2018 00:01
Send private message

solutionz: 

As an example we had a similar situation importing large electrical equipment with no certifications. We paid (>$30k) to have it tested in NZ & AU (which involved changing some sub-components) and report produced. We had to check each unit complied with the test report (same design / required modifications) and carry out particular testing (HiPot etc) on 100% of units. We supplied the SDoC on this basis.

 

I've gotta ask... do you still supply this product?

 

 

 

something about your post feels like it's past tense and you wouldn't look to do it again..





#include <std_disclaimer>

 

Any comments made are personal opinion and do not reflect directly on the position my current or past employers may have.


282 posts

Ultimate Geek


  # 2131457 22-Nov-2018 07:12
Send private message

It sounds like this system and these certifications were designed before online shopping was popular.

It would be nice to see a global electrical standard emerge.

588 posts

Ultimate Geek
Inactive user


  # 2131558 22-Nov-2018 09:48
Send private message

hio77:

 

solutionz: 

As an example we had a similar situation importing large electrical equipment with no certifications. We paid (>$30k) to have it tested in NZ & AU (which involved changing some sub-components) and report produced. We had to check each unit complied with the test report (same design / required modifications) and carry out particular testing (HiPot etc) on 100% of units. We supplied the SDoC on this basis.

 

I've gotta ask... do you still supply this product?

 

 

 

something about your post feels like it's past tense and you wouldn't look to do it again..

 

 

The company still imports them however I no-longer work there. They still had to modify and test the units as per the procedure I left them (based on the test reports) up until a little while ago when the manufacturer came out with a compliant model. Yes we would still do it again due to the commercial advantage of having this compliant equipment available to retail in NZ&AU at the time.

 

 

 

happyfunball: It sounds like this system and these certifications were designed before online shopping was popular.

It would be nice to see a global electrical standard emerge.

 

There are global standards such as IEC/CE, UL etc and regional ones like RCM that most commercially produced "household equipment" (i.e. consumer appliances & gadgets; not mains switches etc) are tested to so are no problem to import from a legitimate supplier. However if you supply them you should still request a test report and/or SDoC from the manufacturer then produce your own SDoC for your customers.

 

The main issue I think people are overlooking is that whoever produces the SDoC must have some way of ensuring continuing compliance of the product through management of the supply chain, random and/or prescribed QA testing etc. You can't just order a unit of AliX, test it, then have that testing apply to every variant available from every supplier (which may externally look identical but may differ significantly internally).


250 posts

Master Geek


  # 2132091 22-Nov-2018 17:54
Send private message

happyfunball: It sounds like this system and these certifications were designed before online shopping was popular.

It would be nice to see a global electrical standard emerge.

 

There are global standards, and our localised ones are mostly based on IEC. There are still localised requirements though.


282 posts

Ultimate Geek


  # 2132094 22-Nov-2018 18:01
Send private message

Tracer:

 

happyfunball: It sounds like this system and these certifications were designed before online shopping was popular.

It would be nice to see a global electrical standard emerge.

 

There are global standards, and our localised ones are mostly based on IEC. There are still localised requirements though.

 

 

Thousands of dollars in compliance cost for each electrical item, that have already been certified for use in the EU doesn't sound like a sensible system to me. I think it might have made sense back in the day of the Harvey Norman walk in sales, but not with todays thousands/millions of electronic products.  

 

Do you know what these local requirements are that are so different from the EU?

 

 

 

 


950 posts

Ultimate Geek


  # 2132102 22-Nov-2018 18:23
One person supports this post
Send private message

happyfunball:

 

Tracer:

 

happyfunball: It sounds like this system and these certifications were designed before online shopping was popular.

It would be nice to see a global electrical standard emerge.

 

There are global standards, and our localised ones are mostly based on IEC. There are still localised requirements though.

 

 

Thousands of dollars in compliance cost for each electrical item, that have already been certified for use in the EU doesn't sound like a sensible system to me.

 

 

I don't agree - I'd be 'cross' with you if I bought one and then my house burnt down cos it was shoddy. Imagine if the supplier dropped quality after you approved and paid for the first batch?

 

Some people will do anything for an extra dollar.

 

 


588 posts

Ultimate Geek
Inactive user


  # 2132109 22-Nov-2018 18:31
Send private message

happyfunball:

 

Thousands of dollars in compliance cost for each electrical item, that have already been certified for use in the EU doesn't sound like a sensible system to me. I think it might have made sense back in the day of the Harvey Norman walk in sales, but not with todays thousands/millions of electronic products.  

 

Do you know what these local requirements are that are so different from the EU?

 

 

EU obviously has different mains plug, voltage, frequency, different language for labelling & manuals etc. Also possibly different EMC spectrum requirements to NZ as with the US etc.

 

So EU ("international") standards such as IEC 61010 [Safety requirements for electrical equipment for measurement, control, and laboratory use] will be localised to AS/NZS-61010 (for NZ & AU) by making a few of those local changes.

 

So manufacturers (or suppliers) can normally test to a general international standard like IEC/CE, then also test only to the localisations of each country they want to export to. This may be a simple as the localised standard saying [in addition to the CE requirements] you must supply a NZ/AU power cord and english language manual & labelling (as opposed to German).


1 | 2 | 3 
View this topic in a long page with up to 500 replies per page Create new topic



Twitter and LinkedIn »



Follow us to receive Twitter updates when new discussions are posted in our forums:



Follow us to receive Twitter updates when news items and blogs are posted in our frontpage:



Follow us to receive Twitter updates when tech item prices are listed in our price comparison site:





News »

Chorus to launch Hyperfibre service
Posted 18-Nov-2019 15:00


Microsoft launches first Experience Center worldwide for Asia Pacific in Singapore
Posted 13-Nov-2019 13:08


Disney+ comes to LG Smart TVs
Posted 13-Nov-2019 12:55


Spark launches new wireless broadband "Unplan Metro"
Posted 11-Nov-2019 08:19


Malwarebytes overhauls flagship product with new UI, faster engine and lighter footprint
Posted 6-Nov-2019 11:48


CarbonClick launches into Digital Marketplaces
Posted 6-Nov-2019 11:42


Kordia offers Microsoft Azure Peering Service
Posted 6-Nov-2019 11:41


Spark 5G live on Auckland Harbour for Emirates Team New Zealand
Posted 4-Nov-2019 17:30


BNZ and Vodafone partner to boost NZ Tech for SME
Posted 31-Oct-2019 17:14


Nokia 7.2 available in New Zealand
Posted 31-Oct-2019 16:24


2talk launches Microsoft Teams Direct Routing product
Posted 29-Oct-2019 10:35


New Breast Cancer Foundation app puts power in Kiwi women's hands
Posted 25-Oct-2019 16:13


OPPO Reno2 Series lands, alongside hybrid noise-cancelling Wireless Headphones
Posted 24-Oct-2019 15:32


Waikato Data Scientists awarded $13 million from the Government
Posted 24-Oct-2019 15:27


D-Link launches Wave 2 Unified Access Points
Posted 24-Oct-2019 15:07



Geekzone Live »

Try automatic live updates from Geekzone directly in your browser, without refreshing the page, with Geekzone Live now.


Support Geekzone »

Our community of supporters help make Geekzone possible. Click the button below to join them.

Support Geezone on PressPatron



Are you subscribed to our RSS feed? You can download the latest headlines and summaries from our stories directly to your computer or smartphone by using a feed reader.

Alternatively, you can receive a daily email with Geekzone updates.