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1199 posts

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  # 1806822 26-Jun-2017 11:15
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andrewNZ:
Try calling around, The chance of you finding someone who will connect something they didn't do and can't see is extremely small. Anyone who will, probably shouldn't be an electrician.
Getting someone to connect another electricians work can be hard if the work is hidden in walls etc.

 

Another knee jerk reaction. It works better leaving the plugs hanging from the walls, then screw them in when the electrician is satisfied. This way its easy for electrician to connect voltmeter to wires, validate connections. check for wiring faults etc. There is no need for an electrician to see through walls. Its the same as calling an electrician to replace a faulty plug socket, he is not going to replace all wiring to that plug socket just because exiting wiring is hidden in walls.

 

I have experienced my fare share of similar arguments in the past, people arguing against doing your own work. I have however found a trend, most of these knee jerk type comments seem to come from electricians themselves. As long as you working inside the law there is no problem with it.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


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  # 1806861 26-Jun-2017 11:48
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Wiggum:

I have experienced my fare share of similar arguments in the past, people arguing against doing your own work. I have however found a trend, most of these knee jerk type comments seem to come from electricians themselves. As long as you working inside the law there is no problem with it.

 



You keep referring to working inside the law. The following extract is the relevant part of the
Electrical Safety Regulations 2010
"57. 3 (e)
installing, extending, and altering subcircuits (including submains), but only if—
(i)
the person does not enter (whether directly, or by holding any material or equipment, or otherwise) any enclosure where live conductors are likely to be present; and
(ii)
the work is tested and certified in accordance with Part 2 of AS/NZS 3000, before being connected to a power supply, by a person authorised to inspect mains work."

An electrician is only authorised to certify mains work, you need an inspector's practising license before you are authorised to INSPECT mains work. This is not something a newly minted electrician can do legally.

I am not an electrician.

 
 
 
 


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  # 1806871 26-Jun-2017 12:15
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Wiggum:

andrewNZ:
Try calling around, The chance of you finding someone who will connect something they didn't do and can't see is extremely small. Anyone who will, probably shouldn't be an electrician.
Getting someone to connect another electricians work can be hard if the work is hidden in walls etc.


Another knee jerk reaction. It works better leaving the plugs hanging from the walls, then screw them in when the electrician is satisfied. This way its easy for electrician to connect voltmeter to wires, validate connections. check for wiring faults etc. There is no need for an electrician to see through walls. Its the same as calling an electrician to replace a faulty plug socket, he is not going to replace all wiring to that plug socket just because exiting wiring is hidden in walls.


I have experienced my fare share of similar arguments in the past, people arguing against doing your own work. I have however found a trend, most of these knee jerk type comments seem to come from electricians themselves. As long as you working inside the law there is no problem with it.


 


 


 


 


Nothing knee jerk about it. I am a fully qualified electrician.
If I couldn't see the work in it's entirety, I would laugh and walk away. I can't see how cable is run, or the condition it is in.

Make no mistake, an electrician putting their name to someone else's work, is a risk. It's a risk to their livelihood, and if something goes seriously wrong it's a risk to their freedom.




Location: Dunedin

 


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  # 1806872 26-Jun-2017 12:17
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And in the interests of getting this thread back on topic, and preventing it becomming another one of "those" threads, I'm going to leave it alone now.




Location: Dunedin

 


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  # 1806880 26-Jun-2017 12:39
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Bung:
Wiggum:

 

I have experienced my fare share of similar arguments in the past, people arguing against doing your own work. I have however found a trend, most of these knee jerk type comments seem to come from electricians themselves. As long as you working inside the law there is no problem with it.

 

 

 



You keep referring to working inside the law. The following extract is the relevant part of the
Electrical Safety Regulations 2010
"57. 3 (e)
installing, extending, and altering subcircuits (including submains), but only if—
(i)
the person does not enter (whether directly, or by holding any material or equipment, or otherwise) any enclosure where live conductors are likely to be present; and
(ii)
the work is tested and certified in accordance with Part 2 of AS/NZS 3000, before being connected to a power supply, by a person authorised to inspect mains work."

An electrician is only authorised to certify mains work, you need an inspector's practising license before you are authorised to INSPECT mains work. This is not something a newly minted electrician can do legally.

I am not an electrician.

 

There is nothing illegal about installing a couple of new plugs/light fitting etc into your house yourself.

 

As long as you don't connect them that is. Depending on the electrician, they may/may not conenct your work. Different Discussion!

 

Back to the topic then at hand.

 

3puttssuck:

 

I am about to place a computer nook into an existing double wardrobe. I am wanting to put some power plugs in the wardrobe. 2 x 4 outlets. I am wanting to put in the flush boxes and pull the wires myself and then get a sparky to connect it all up.

 

 

 

 

Yes this is perfectly legal just as long as you dont connect it to the mains and you allow for an electrician to do that on your behalf.

 

If you don't want to involve an electrician, or get into the legalities of all this, then simply plug the power points into another existing power point. problem solved!


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  # 1806930 26-Jun-2017 12:59
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3puttssuck:

 

I am about to place a computer nook into an existing double wardrobe. I am wanting to put some power plugs in the wardrobe. 2 x 4 outlets. I am wanting to put in the flush boxes and pull the wires myself and then get a sparky to connect it all up.

 

So the questions is, will he be able to / allowed to, run a feed wire from the existing light switch on the outside of the wardrobe wall. Or will I need to run the wires all the way back to the meter box. I hope this make sense.

 

TIA.

 

 

In essence you're going to create a small power hub. Not a big deal in it's own right, but just let your sparky know. I have 6 points in a closet, and we just took a little extra care around running the wiring back to the board, and making sure it didn't concentrate everything into one set of wires and make the wall nice and warm etc.

 

I doubt you will have any high current devices - my high current devices are the dryer and washing machine, and together they pull 20A at peak load.

 

 





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Antonios K

 

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  # 1806935 26-Jun-2017 13:11
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andrewNZ:
I am a fully qualified electrician.
If I couldn't see the work in it's entirety, I would laugh and walk away. I can't see how cable is run, or the condition it is in.

 

Glad that most of the electricians I have used in the past have not been like this. Most that I have dealt with are keen, and willing to help. Have never experienced an electrician that has just laughed and walked away. hopefully I never do.


 
 
 
 


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  # 1806938 26-Jun-2017 13:19
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Wiggum:

 

andrewNZ:
I am a fully qualified electrician.
If I couldn't see the work in it's entirety, I would laugh and walk away. I can't see how cable is run, or the condition it is in.

 

Glad that most of the electricians I have used in the past have not been like this. Most that I have dealt with are keen, and willing to help. Have never experienced an electrician that has just laughed and walked away. hopefully I never do.

 

 

If an electrician can't see the whole picture, how could anyone expect the person to sign a form saying s/he is responsible for the work?





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  # 1806939 26-Jun-2017 13:23
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freitasm:

 

Wiggum:

 

andrewNZ:
I am a fully qualified electrician.
If I couldn't see the work in it's entirety, I would laugh and walk away. I can't see how cable is run, or the condition it is in.

 

Glad that most of the electricians I have used in the past have not been like this. Most that I have dealt with are keen, and willing to help. Have never experienced an electrician that has just laughed and walked away. hopefully I never do.

 

 

If an electrician can't see the whole picture, how could anyone expect the person to sign a form saying s/he is responsible for the work?

 

 

What about installing the wires externally? maybe thats also an option for the OP? Some of my plugs in the garage are wired like this.

 

 


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  # 1806942 26-Jun-2017 13:34
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Wiggum:

 

freitasm:

 

Wiggum:

 

andrewNZ:
I am a fully qualified electrician.
If I couldn't see the work in it's entirety, I would laugh and walk away. I can't see how cable is run, or the condition it is in.

 

Glad that most of the electricians I have used in the past have not been like this. Most that I have dealt with are keen, and willing to help. Have never experienced an electrician that has just laughed and walked away. hopefully I never do.

 

 

If an electrician can't see the whole picture, how could anyone expect the person to sign a form saying s/he is responsible for the work?

 

 

What about installing the wires externally? maybe thats also an option for the OP? Some of my plugs in the garage are wired like this.

 

 

 

 

What about just getting an electrician to do it?

 

Should be an informal "Rule #1" in forums - if you have to ask how to do something with mains electricity, then get a sparky.

 

The discussions always degenerate to pedantic interpretations of what you are and are not permitted to DIY.

 

If you go back to the original post, IIRC the poster was asking about wiring a wall outlet looping from a lighting circuit.

 

No deep discussion needed.  He should not DIY.


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  # 1806948 26-Jun-2017 13:45
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Fred99:

 

 

 

If you go back to the original post, IIRC the poster was asking about wiring a wall outlet looping from a lighting circuit.

 

No deep discussion needed.  He should not DIY.

 

 

And as pointed out by @richms, that wiring is probably fine in certain instances. At least the OP has raised the question and not just gone and done the DIY himself, lets give him some credit for that.

 

And who are you to say OP can/cannot DIY?

 

 

 

Fred99:

 

What about just getting an electrician to do it?

 

 

 

 

Should we get an electrician to change the plug n my toaster too? or change the plug on my extension cord? Change the light bulb? I would expect DIY to be a big part of geekzone? Or am I wrong?

 

 

 

 




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# 1806965 26-Jun-2017 13:52
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Thanks to all those who have contributed to my original question(s). To be on the safe side of the law, I will not be doing any of the work myself . A sparky has been booked.

 

End of discussion. 


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