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391 posts

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# 217827 13-Jul-2017 21:50
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Hi guys,

 

I always wondered how the timber slabs are turned into pieces like this?

 

These are usually made of macrocarpa slabs 55mm thick.

 

How do they cut the intricate shapes?Note that some curves are completely enclosed in the slab (they are not part of the "perimeter")

 

- Router from either side? the two patterns need to be carefully positioned - use side-to-side centering holes? The edges seem to be routed...

 

- Large industrial router from one side only?Like a large CNC machine?

 

- Saber saw (the "back" would not be accurate as the blade end goes everywhere...) then lots of manual "cleaning" of the edges?

 

What is the way to tackle such project in a DIY environment?

 

Many thanks for looking at this

 


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  # 1822146 13-Jul-2017 21:57
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I would guess a template and then a bearing bit, clean up the point of the inside with a saw of some sort or chisel it out. You can see theyve done a crap job with the roundover bit, just using the opening as a template so its missed all the sharp corners etc.

 

Infact you can see on the top of it where they have stuffed up with the saw and gone too far. Very amature work on that.





Richard rich.ms

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  # 1822171 13-Jul-2017 22:29
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A router would be possible but you would be there for days. You can't do sharp corners on a router either, so it would need a fair amount of manual work afterwards to get the sharp points. I would guess a band saw for the external edges and either a (big) scroll saw or jigsaw for the inside cut-outs. There might be some plunge saw action going on too - that would explain the overcut lines at the top.


 
 
 
 




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Ultimate Geek


  # 1822174 13-Jul-2017 22:40
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Hi Richard,

 

I have not noticed the two saw marks on top (until you mentioned them)...

 

This could mean that a saber saw was the main tool?

 

I have seen a clip on youtube long time ago where the teeth of a circular saw blade were bent sideways with pliers to create a very wide kerf (like a chainsaw), which allowed you to cut a curve. The wider the kerf the tighter the curve you can cut (smaller radius). Maybe that would work faster for the long gentle curves? But the blade could not be used for anything else... 

 

if you use saber saw (reciprocating saw) the end of the blade will not accurately follow the pattern in the same way as the blade end close to the machine - is there any trick to ensure the far end follows a path closer to what is cut on the other face?


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  # 1822438 14-Jul-2017 13:04
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im thinking holesaw on the round parts - they all look the same diameter.





Richard rich.ms

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  # 1822449 14-Jul-2017 13:09
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Holesaw, jigsaw, router, drill, and maybe a sabre saw. No sander obviously :D


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  # 1822451 14-Jul-2017 13:12
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aucklander:

 

if you use saber saw (reciprocating saw) the end of the blade will not accurately follow the pattern in the same way as the blade end close to the machine - is there any trick to ensure the far end follows a path closer to what is cut on the other face?

 

 

I dont think that bothered them having a closer look at the ends of the pointy parts - they are all over the place so I take back about it being with a template. Also now im looking on the computer can see that its wonky all over it so most likly handheld saw, possibly too thick for a jigsaw so maybe a sawzall or similar.





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  # 1822456 14-Jul-2017 13:15
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Lots of auger bits and hole saws then some generous time with sand paper and files. Probably a router looking at the edges too.. 
A friend of my fathers when i was growing up crafted punga statues only with a chainsaw and cheese grater style file. Thats it. 

 

 


 
 
 
 


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  # 1822457 14-Jul-2017 13:16
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richms:

 

aucklander:

 

if you use saber saw (reciprocating saw) the end of the blade will not accurately follow the pattern in the same way as the blade end close to the machine - is there any trick to ensure the far end follows a path closer to what is cut on the other face?

 

 

I dont think that bothered them having a closer look at the ends of the pointy parts - they are all over the place so I take back about it being with a template. Also now im looking on the computer can see that its wonky all over it so most likly handheld saw, possibly too thick for a jigsaw so maybe a sawzall or similar.

 

 

 

 

You can see sawzor marks in the top koru bit in the centre. Not a hard piece to make. 


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  # 1822461 14-Jul-2017 13:28
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I think the basic shape would be cut out with a bandsaw. The rest, an assortment of tools as others have described.

It's actually pretty rough work if you look at it. Not great craftsmanship.

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  # 1822463 14-Jul-2017 13:31
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Hole saw to get started.

 

Hand held bandsaw like this to do the straighter cuts.

 

A router to finish the edges.

 

A quick belt sand each side. Maybe

 

Sprayed a couple of coats of varnish on it.

 

Job done.

 

 

 

Edit. On a second look, there is one cut that would require a Reciprocating saw or Jig Saw.


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  # 1822478 14-Jul-2017 13:57
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If you were inclined to have a crack, you can try cutting from underneath. Draw your template on the top and drill a hole inside that to get started. Then watch the blade as you're cutting to keep it on the line (c.f. the machine side). For me, this seems to be much easier to keep the blade on target (with jigsaws at least) than watching from the machine side and just hoping the cut is straight. I think the problem you will have with the sabre saw and this technique is that the machine is 180 deg to the blade so will be awkward.

You could also try possibly the most _manly_ new tool I've seen in a while - the Festool Sword Saw [Tim Toolman Taylor grunts]. I doubt that particular H+S nightmare will ever be officially on sale here - though I guess it's probably still safer than a chainsaw?

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