Geekzone: technology news, blogs, forums
Guest
Welcome Guest.
You haven't logged in yet. If you don't have an account you can register now.




181 posts

Master Geek


# 217872 16-Jul-2017 15:25
Send private message

Hi all, does anyone happen to know if replacing a lighting transformer falls into the work you can legally do as DIY, or does it need a registered Electrician to do it? Had a look at the info on the EnergySafety site (link to nice PDF that gives a good summary) and it refers to quite a few things that can be DIY'd, but no reference to transformer replacement.

 

To be specific this is replacing the common 230 - 12V transformers that power the bazillion MR16 fittings in my house - a few are starting to die, and the transformers for a couple of fittings don't play nice with LEDs...


View this topic in a long page with up to 500 replies per page Create new topic
 1 | 2
2523 posts

Uber Geek

Lifetime subscriber

  # 1825876 20-Jul-2017 13:38
Send private message

AFAIR about the only mains wiring you are allowed to do is wire up a 3 pin plug.

 

You can very easily replace the LED transformer yourself but not sure if you may do it yourself! 

 

Just unscrew the plastic cover to expose the screw terminals and disconnect the old one and reconnect the new one. Obviously the mains needs to be isolated from that circuit at the main board and then tested with a voltage tester first.

 

 


117 posts

Master Geek


  # 1825885 20-Jul-2017 13:53
Send private message

Check this site out...

 

https://www.consumer.org.nz/articles/diy-or-tradespeople#article-diy-electrical-work

 

 

 

I'm a member of Consumer and contacted them about this same question (I wanted to DIY the transformer change). 

 

They confirmed you can DIY it (if you own and live in).

 

 

 

I still don't know if this applies to the lights where the packaging states, must be installed by a licensed electrician.


 
 
 
 


4150 posts

Uber Geek


  # 1825901 20-Jul-2017 14:17
One person supports this post
Send private message

Suckerpunch:

 

I still don't know if this applies to the lights where the packaging states, must be installed by a licensed electrician.

 

 

That packaging is likely intended for Australian Audiences, which have much stricter wiring rules than ours,

 

Which is why you will occasionally find LED downlight sets with a 3 point plug on them ,  (I've heard it recommended that each light have a 3 point plug in the ceiling space so its legal for the homeowner to install/change LED downlights,- but that might be apocryphal)

 

 


1087 posts

Uber Geek


  # 1825906 20-Jul-2017 14:22
One person supports this post
Send private message

The official NZECP rules can be found here.

 

Transformers and not specifically mentioned, however section 47(1)a(iii) allows a home owner to replace "Permanent connection units" in addition to various outlets, thermostats, elements and light fittings.

 

 

 

 

 

 


5385 posts

Uber Geek


  # 1825911 20-Jul-2017 14:31
Send private message

Not notwithstanding regulations, I would still get a professional for an apartment or other (semi)-attached dwelling





Mike

22635 posts

Uber Geek

Trusted
Subscriber

  # 1825913 20-Jul-2017 14:34
Send private message

The plugs are used mostly now because they have finally told sparkys off for leaving single insulated cable hanging out of the transformers and for not passing the earth thru between transformers that do not need it. With 1.5mm wire and possibly 3 of them at a light, the crap terminals on drivers and the clamp etc cant cope, so the cheapest easiest way is to put an unswitched socket on the wires and then a 2 pin plug on the driver.

 

Also means that the lights can be removed and fitted easily by the gipstoppers/painters etc who in the past were able to take a lamp out of the downlight and then pop the downlight out of the ceiling, whereas with integrated drivers there isnt an easy way to do that without leaving them hanging on wires out the hole they are working around.





Richard rich.ms

2523 posts

Uber Geek

Lifetime subscriber

  # 1825925 20-Jul-2017 14:45
Send private message

Couldn't login to comsumer to read the link, @Suckerpunch, but found this:

 

http://www.energysafety.govt.nz/consumer/safe-living-with-electricity/getting-electrical-work-done/doing-your-own-electrical-work

 

Wow! You may do a lot more than I realised as long as you believe you are competent and stay out of the switchboard!

 

What electrical work can I do?

 

You must own and live in the property to do the following work on low voltage electrical installations (when there is no payment or reward):

 

  • Remove and replace any of the following kinds of fittings, where the work does not involve work on any switchboard:

     

    • Switches,
    • Socket outlets,
    • Permanent connection units,
    • Light fittings,
    • Batten holders,
    • Cord grip lampholders,
    • Ceiling roses,
    • Flexible cords coed to any permanent connection unit, ceiling rose, or cord grip lampholder,
    • Water heater switches,
    • Thermostats,
    • Elements.
  • Remove and replace fuse links.
  • Connect and disconnect fixed wired appliances.
  • Relocate existing switches, socket outlets, and lighting outlets that are supplied with electricity by toughplastic- sheathed cables.
  • Install, extend, and alter subcircuits (including submains), provided that:

     

    • You must not enter (whether personally, by holding any material or equipment, or otherwise) any enclosure where live active conductors are likely to be present;
    • You cannot connect your work to the electricity supply yourself
    • You must get the finished work tested and connected by a licensed electrical inspector who will verify the safety of the completed work before connecting it. It is advisable to have consulted the inspector prior to starting any installation, extension, or alterations.

The big takeaway from the above for me me (and others here) is you may wire in your in-wall home automation switches!

 

 


 
 
 
 


117 posts

Master Geek


  # 1826303 21-Jul-2017 06:54
Send private message

Sorry bout the link @kryptonjohn.

 

The info on the consumer site is basically the same as what you and @kryptonjohn have found\posted.


44 posts

Geek


  # 1826357 21-Jul-2017 09:26
Send private message

I was recently asking myself a similar question (replacing halogen downlights with LED ones) and during my research I discovered that whilst it is certainly legal to do it here in NZ, be sure you can perform the work correctly and/or get it signed off by a sparkie afterwards because if there are any problems with it your insurance company will jump at the chance to decline a claim.


2523 posts

Uber Geek

Lifetime subscriber

  # 1826383 21-Jul-2017 10:13
Send private message

I reckon the biggest risk I face with electricity in the house is driving a screw into a live wire behind the drywall. Just finished our refurb so am spending a lot of time screwing things to walls - toilet roll holders, hand rails etc etc. I have a stud-finder that reports AC but I'm still nervous...

 

Has anyone ever heard first hand about home handyman opening up a live wire or water pipe?

 

 


270 posts

Ultimate Geek

Trusted

  # 1826388 21-Jul-2017 10:30
Send private message

kryptonjohn:

 

I reckon the biggest risk I face with electricity in the house is driving a screw into a live wire behind the drywall. Just finished our refurb so am spending a lot of time screwing things to walls - toilet roll holders, hand rails etc etc. I have a stud-finder that reports AC but I'm still nervous...

 

Has anyone ever heard first hand about home handyman opening up a live wire or water pipe?

 

 

 

 

Unfortunately, yes, it is not uncommon, you can easily search the news sites for home handymen being electrocuted (underfloor insulation features quite a lot here).

 

Having said that, if you have just finished a refurb, was the wiring all replaced and installed correctly by a registered sparky (if wiring is run properly, the risk of being able to hit a wire is reduced significantly) and were RCD's fitted to all circuits at the DB?





Michael Skyrme - Instrumentation & Controls

2523 posts

Uber Geek

Lifetime subscriber

  # 1826397 21-Jul-2017 10:51
Send private message

Yep all the wiring runs done by sparkies, probably spent over $20k on that trade alone.

 

The (brand new) switch board has RCDs... not sure how they relate to the circuits as there are 3 or 4 RCDs but many more breakers than that?

 

I didn't take enough notice of where the cables were before the gib went on... what is the best practice you refer to that helps avoid hitting wires? 


2312 posts

Uber Geek

Trusted

  # 1826454 21-Jul-2017 11:59
Send private message

MikeSkyrme:

 

kryptonjohn:

 

I reckon the biggest risk I face with electricity in the house is driving a screw into a live wire behind the drywall. Just finished our refurb so am spending a lot of time screwing things to walls - toilet roll holders, hand rails etc etc. I have a stud-finder that reports AC but I'm still nervous...

 

Has anyone ever heard first hand about home handyman opening up a live wire or water pipe?

 

 

 

 

Unfortunately, yes, it is not uncommon, you can easily search the news sites for home handymen being electrocuted (underfloor insulation features quite a lot here).

 

Having said that, if you have just finished a refurb, was the wiring all replaced and installed correctly by a registered sparky (if wiring is run properly, the risk of being able to hit a wire is reduced significantly) and were RCD's fitted to all circuits at the DB?

 

 

Just to add to this - best practice is running cables vertically (through top/bottom plates and dwangs/nogs) rather than horizontally through studs. Also meant to be in the middle of the framing, so screws less than say 40mm are a good idea. I'd be trying to fix things to studs rather than nogs/dwangs where possible, and using as short a screw as possible (but anchored into timber). Plastic wall toggles/wallmates shouldn't be much of a problem unless it's a dense area for cables e.g. above the switchboard.


2523 posts

Uber Geek

Lifetime subscriber

  # 1826462 21-Jul-2017 12:14
Send private message

Roger. Look for studs, avoid nogs especially at centers

Thanks
JohnO

117 posts

Master Geek


  # 1826514 21-Jul-2017 14:02
Send private message

kryptonjohn:

 

The (brand new) switch board has RCDs... not sure how they relate to the circuits as there are 3 or 4 RCDs but many more breakers than that?

 

 

Not sure if I'm pointing out the obvious here, but the RCD's are load rated higher then the fuse circuits. So 1 RCD covers multiple circuits.

 

Process of elimination to determine which circuits are covered by which RCD.


 1 | 2
View this topic in a long page with up to 500 replies per page Create new topic



Twitter and LinkedIn »



Follow us to receive Twitter updates when new discussions are posted in our forums:



Follow us to receive Twitter updates when news items and blogs are posted in our frontpage:



Follow us to receive Twitter updates when tech item prices are listed in our price comparison site:





News »

Chorus to launch Hyperfibre service
Posted 18-Nov-2019 15:00


Microsoft launches first Experience Center worldwide for Asia Pacific in Singapore
Posted 13-Nov-2019 13:08


Disney+ comes to LG Smart TVs
Posted 13-Nov-2019 12:55


Spark launches new wireless broadband "Unplan Metro"
Posted 11-Nov-2019 08:19


Malwarebytes overhauls flagship product with new UI, faster engine and lighter footprint
Posted 6-Nov-2019 11:48


CarbonClick launches into Digital Marketplaces
Posted 6-Nov-2019 11:42


Kordia offers Microsoft Azure Peering Service
Posted 6-Nov-2019 11:41


Spark 5G live on Auckland Harbour for Emirates Team New Zealand
Posted 4-Nov-2019 17:30


BNZ and Vodafone partner to boost NZ Tech for SME
Posted 31-Oct-2019 17:14


Nokia 7.2 available in New Zealand
Posted 31-Oct-2019 16:24


2talk launches Microsoft Teams Direct Routing product
Posted 29-Oct-2019 10:35


New Breast Cancer Foundation app puts power in Kiwi women's hands
Posted 25-Oct-2019 16:13


OPPO Reno2 Series lands, alongside hybrid noise-cancelling Wireless Headphones
Posted 24-Oct-2019 15:32


Waikato Data Scientists awarded $13 million from the Government
Posted 24-Oct-2019 15:27


D-Link launches Wave 2 Unified Access Points
Posted 24-Oct-2019 15:07



Geekzone Live »

Try automatic live updates from Geekzone directly in your browser, without refreshing the page, with Geekzone Live now.


Support Geekzone »

Our community of supporters help make Geekzone possible. Click the button below to join them.

Support Geezone on PressPatron



Are you subscribed to our RSS feed? You can download the latest headlines and summaries from our stories directly to your computer or smartphone by using a feed reader.

Alternatively, you can receive a daily email with Geekzone updates.