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  Reply # 1893374 31-Oct-2017 22:40
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graemeh:

 

mentalinc:

 

nunz:

 

 

 

Any light bulb over 2.4 metres high needs a sparky to replace them under h&s laws.

 

 

Guess they need full scaffolding as well for such an unsafe job? 

 

 

 

 

Not necessary but they will need three people.  One to hold the ladder, one to warn anyone passing by of the dangerous situation and the third to actually change the bulb.

 

 

 

 

this is how jokes start





Common sense is not as common as you think.


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  Reply # 1893538 1-Nov-2017 11:44
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vexxxboy:

 

graemeh:

 

mentalinc:

 

nunz:

 

 

 

Any light bulb over 2.4 metres high needs a sparky to replace them under h&s laws.

 

 

Guess they need full scaffolding as well for such an unsafe job? 

 

 

 

 

Not necessary but they will need three people.  One to hold the ladder, one to warn anyone passing by of the dangerous situation and the third to actually change the bulb.

 

 

 

 

this is how jokes start

 

 

True but if it was a joke, I'd say it took five people.  Person 4 holding the gopro to record the action and person 5 telling the one person doing any work how awesome they are.


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  Reply # 1893550 1-Nov-2017 12:04
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graemeh:

 

nunz:

 

Any light bulb over 2.4 metres high needs a sparky to replace them under h&s laws.

 

 

Can you provide a link to where this is documented, my understanding is that the h&s laws are not that prescriptive.

 

 

 

 

http://www.tenancy.co.nz/whose-responsibility-is-it-to-change-light-bulbs-tenant-or-landlord/





nunz

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  Reply # 1893551 1-Nov-2017 12:07
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Handrails for an enclosed staircase could be a complete PITA. 

 

For example our staircase just has enough room to get the larger items of furniture up it with a lot of fiddly manoeuvring.

 

If I added a handrail - no chance!  It would have to be removed for anyone to move in or out of the house.





Mike

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  Reply # 1893684 1-Nov-2017 15:51
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davidcole:

 

Senecio:

 

I'm all for minimum standards on safety items on things such as fire & smoke alarms. Beyond that a tenant has to take responsibility for renting a place that is suitable for them and their family. 

 

 

The other bit I had an issue with, but we wont know the back story, is if the place failed on the porch light (like it did) why didn't the tenant notify the landlord that the bulb was out.

 

 

Since when did the land lord become responsible to replace blown light bulbs? I have always replaced them when they have blown in rentals we have tenanted.


sxz

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  Reply # 1893725 1-Nov-2017 16:58
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nunz:

 

graemeh:

 

nunz:

 

Any light bulb over 2.4 metres high needs a sparky to replace them under h&s laws.

 

 

Can you provide a link to where this is documented, my understanding is that the h&s laws are not that prescriptive.

 

 

 

 

http://www.tenancy.co.nz/whose-responsibility-is-it-to-change-light-bulbs-tenant-or-landlord/

 

 

I'm calling bollocks, until I see the law that says that.  


UHD

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  Reply # 1893726 1-Nov-2017 17:00
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dickytim:

 

davidcole:

 

Senecio:

 

I'm all for minimum standards on safety items on things such as fire & smoke alarms. Beyond that a tenant has to take responsibility for renting a place that is suitable for them and their family. 

 

 

The other bit I had an issue with, but we wont know the back story, is if the place failed on the porch light (like it did) why didn't the tenant notify the landlord that the bulb was out.

 

 

Since when did the land lord become responsible to replace blown light bulbs? I have always replaced them when they have blown in rentals we have tenanted.

 

 

I can see how many people might be confused but when you move in there are functioning lightbulbs and when you move out you don't remove lightbulbs (unless you're a really poor tenant) so it make sense that it is a landlord's responsibility to maintain them. I just keep a box of spares in a cupboard somewhere so tenants can replace them as needed.

 

The last rental I purchased was in a very sorry state so as part of the renovations I replaced all the bulbs with LEDs which should last a good few years unless someone decides to smash them.


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  Reply # 1893749 1-Nov-2017 17:35
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sxz:

 

nunz:

 

graemeh:

 

nunz:

 

Any light bulb over 2.4 metres high needs a sparky to replace them under h&s laws.

 

 

Can you provide a link to where this is documented, my understanding is that the h&s laws are not that prescriptive.

 

 

 

 

http://www.tenancy.co.nz/whose-responsibility-is-it-to-change-light-bulbs-tenant-or-landlord/

 

 

I'm calling bollocks, until I see the law that says that.  

 

 

MBIE states that it's unclear where the responsibility lies

 

https://www.tenancy.govt.nz/maintenance-and-inspections/regular-maintenance/maintaining-the-property/#id_384374-both-landlords-and-tenants-can-be-responsible-for-light-bulbs

 

 

 

The tenancy.co.nz 'legal expert' makes a few other questionable statements on that article


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  Reply # 1894299 2-Nov-2017 15:20
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I saw the Housing WOF on Stuff earlier this week, wow.  I thought all they'd be concerned with would whether the home was properly insulated or not, damp and or mold issues, and heating/heat-pumps. 

 

Failing a home due to a blown lightbulb or not having a latch on a windows is going a bit too far. 

 

All this regulation will do is increase the rents for the tenants.  As a friend of mine who is landlord said to me " I'm not the Salvation Army" so rent will go up if these WOF's become compulsory.


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  Reply # 1894361 2-Nov-2017 18:31
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nunz:

 

graemeh:

 

nunz:

 

Any light bulb over 2.4 metres high needs a sparky to replace them under h&s laws.

 

 

Can you provide a link to where this is documented, my understanding is that the h&s laws are not that prescriptive.

 

 

 

 

http://www.tenancy.co.nz/whose-responsibility-is-it-to-change-light-bulbs-tenant-or-landlord/

 

 

 

 

Their legal expert clearly has no experience of health and safety law. There is no arbitrary height that is requires an electrician under health and safety law. This is just FUD.

 

Using an electrician does nothing to manage the risk of a fall.


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  Reply # 1894418 2-Nov-2017 19:52
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UHD:

 

dickytim:

 

davidcole:

 

Senecio:

 

I'm all for minimum standards on safety items on things such as fire & smoke alarms. Beyond that a tenant has to take responsibility for renting a place that is suitable for them and their family. 

 

 

The other bit I had an issue with, but we wont know the back story, is if the place failed on the porch light (like it did) why didn't the tenant notify the landlord that the bulb was out.

 

 

Since when did the land lord become responsible to replace blown light bulbs? I have always replaced them when they have blown in rentals we have tenanted.

 

 

I can see how many people might be confused but when you move in there are functioning lightbulbs and when you move out you don't remove lightbulbs (unless you're a really poor tenant) so it make sense that it is a landlord's responsibility to maintain them. I just keep a box of spares in a cupboard somewhere so tenants can replace them as needed.

 

The last rental I purchased was in a very sorry state so as part of the renovations I replaced all the bulbs with LEDs which should last a good few years unless someone decides to smash them.

 

 

I've always taken out the lightbulbs when I moved in the past so I could keep my energy efficient light bulbs I'd purchased. Although I always made sure that I left a light bulb in place




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  Reply # 1911862 2-Dec-2017 01:19
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The Healthy homes guarantee bill has been passed into law. But this law itself doesn't actually specify any min standards that rental homes need to comply with. It does establish a legal framework to define standards that rental homes need to comply with though.

 

I can see this being fun for one of the rental properties that my mother owns. As it is a downstairs 70s brick / concrete unit. The ceiling / floor between her unit and the one above is solid concrete. And the switchboard is in the centre of the unit. So the only way to get power to a heatpump, is to tap into existing circuits that are on external walls.  The design of the unit means that it only has 2 external walls. (Side 1 has the garage, bedroom 1 and lounge while side 2 has dining room, kitchen, bathroom, bedroom 2). I don't know if any of the lounge or bedroom power points are on the external walls, and it would be silly to wire a heatpump to the kitchen circuits. So most likely that unit will only get some wall mount electric resistance heaters. Which won't be of any use to the tenants. And the tenants will probably complain that they look ugly, and get in the way of their furniture. And even worse, the submains cable to that unit looks to be only 6mm2 - it is protected by a 30A rewirable fuse in the common meter box. So even if you could get more cables to the switchboard, there is unlikely to be any spare capacity in that cable.

 

First sentence of this herald article - the government claims that the new minimum standards wont push up the price of renting. I hope they will turn out to be right, but I can see this pushing up rents. As standards committees have a habit of constantly making standards tougher, without any concern about the extra costs of complying.






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  Reply # 1913366 5-Dec-2017 14:45
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Handle9:

 

nunz:

 

graemeh:

 

nunz:

 

Any light bulb over 2.4 metres high needs a sparky to replace them under h&s laws.

 

 

Can you provide a link to where this is documented, my understanding is that the h&s laws are not that prescriptive.

 

 

 

 

http://www.tenancy.co.nz/whose-responsibility-is-it-to-change-light-bulbs-tenant-or-landlord/

 

 

 

 

Their legal expert clearly has no experience of health and safety law. There is no arbitrary height that is requires an electrician under health and safety law. This is just FUD.

 

Using an electrician does nothing to manage the risk of a fall.

 

 

 

 

I wonder if it is an application of the max height for steps stuff. Anything above a certain height step (300mm???) is considered a hazard and due care needs to be taken (e.g. step stools, ladders retc). As the house is a rental , that makes it a form of business. does that mean the landlord either has to do it themselves or else get a subbie (sparky) with site safe equipment and certs in to do it?

 

Could be application of a couple of parts of the h&s laws.

 

 

 

My favorite h&s was the requirement to wear a harness when you are more than 2m off the ground in a cherry picker. The strap on the harness is 3m long so I'll crater 1m before it brakes me. ... Duh!!!

 

 





nunz

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  Reply # 1913463 5-Dec-2017 17:29
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nunz:

 

I wonder if it is an application of the max height for steps stuff. Anything above a certain height step (300mm???) is considered a hazard and due care needs to be taken (e.g. step stools, ladders retc). As the house is a rental , that makes it a form of business. does that mean the landlord either has to do it themselves or else get a subbie (sparky) with site safe equipment and certs in to do it?

 

Could be application of a couple of parts of the h&s laws.

 

 

No it's FUD and people having no understanding of what our health and safety laws mean. There is no legal requirement for a certain height to be managed there is a requirement for health and safety to be managed (a trip or fall hazard can be of any height) and that the people carrying out work are competent and qualified to undertake the work they are undertaking. Replacing a light bulb is a user serviceable part.

 

The duties of a PCBU are pretty well defined and there is quite a bit of applicable case law around due to the similarity of our law to Australias laws.


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