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  Reply # 1950959 2-Feb-2018 22:23
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Some models you put a hose on the outlet to save having to empty the tank. My folks keep their basement/workshop dry this way, and use it to dry washing.

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  Reply # 1950968 2-Feb-2018 23:38
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cadman:

I'd go Mitsubishi. IMHO DeLonghi have always had a low quality feel with a high quality price.


There's really no good reason not to get a dehumidifier. I've had one for 25 years. The same one, actually. It's pretty industrial but effective. Opening the windows only reduces the humidity in the home to that of the air outside. Using a dehumidifier reduces it below that. Contrary to popular opinion and the snake-oil salesmen of forced ventilation systems, the amount of moisture in the roof space is not less than that of the outside air for the most part - it's the exact same air. The RH will be lower but only by virtue of the fact the air is usually warmer in the roof space as the insulation is above the ceiling, not under the roofing. The g/m³ will be basically the same.


The dehumidifier will slightly raise the room temperature (losses due to inefficiencies remain in the room) but it will actually FEEL cooler due to the lower humidity.


Dehumidifiers are cheap to run and in winter offset the cost of heating by lowering the specific heat of the air so it takes less heating to raise the temperature by the same amount. It's a really win-win.



As for room heating, a dehumidifier actually gives you free heating. Due to the latent heat of water. Every litre of water that a dehumidifier removes from the air. You get approx 0.6Kw/Hr of free heat.





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  Reply # 1950977 3-Feb-2018 00:02
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1eStar: Some models you put a hose on the outlet to save having to empty the tank. My folks keep their basement/workshop dry this way, and use it to dry washing.

 

Yeah but that costs more than the cheap ones without that, and a hole in the tank and a tank fitting is pretty easy to do.





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  Reply # 1952688 6-Feb-2018 23:15
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richms:

 

Starscream122:

 

Why are you worried about your shed?

 

 

Because there is stuff in it, and its not air conditioned or anything. If it didn't have one in there running I would have rusted tools and moldy winter bed linens etc.

 

FWIW I have a cheapie that has an analog humidity control on it, and drilled a hole in its tank to take a hose out the floor of the shed into a garden area. Put it on a timer so it only runs during the day when its at its warmest in there so it actually does something. Probably pulls 2-3l a day out of the air which is just what gets back into the place thru the lousy sealing aluminuim joinery and what else permiates thru the building membrane etc, so pretty similar to most houses. No cooking or showering done in there obviously, so its all just what comes in from natural convection etc.

 

I would think you could pull more moisture out of the air for less cost as the shed starts to cool down in the late afternoon, obviously before it gets too cold. hot air holds more humidity than cold air (hence the condensation) so the dehumidifier has to run for longer to extract enough moisture.





Qualified in business, certified in fibre, stuck in copper, have to keep going  ^_^

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  Reply # 1952691 6-Feb-2018 23:31
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Suns out so thats when the solar is making the most. If I dont use it then I sell it back at slighlty under half what it would cost me so even if it runs for twice as long to do the same amount during the day then its breaking even, and it doesnt really seem to hurt it for how dry it ends up in there.

 

Once I have the crap in it sorted out and can do some wall insulation will see what difference that makes to it, but just too much crap at the moment.





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  Reply # 1952932 7-Feb-2018 13:56
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webwat:

 

I would think you could pull more moisture out of the air for less cost as the shed starts to cool down in the late afternoon, obviously before it gets too cold. hot air holds more humidity than cold air (hence the condensation) so the dehumidifier has to run for longer to extract enough moisture.

 

 

Warm air certainly has the potential to hold more moisture than cooler air but it won't actually be doing that during the warmest part of the day unless there is moisture being added to it, which there will be from increase evaporation rates, but not as much as you may think, unless it's just rained and the sun has come out.

 

For this reason it's more efficient to run a dehumidifier at temperatures just above the dew point because it needs to remove less heat from the air in order to condense water vapour.

 

 

 

Edit: Link to dew point calculator added. I'm being a little facetious. The dew point for 20°C at 100% humidity is of course... 20°C haha




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  Reply # 1952938 7-Feb-2018 14:03
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How do i know quart the dew point is in my house?

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