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  Reply # 1994254 11-Apr-2018 13:12
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I think one of the things I find interesting when I see these ‘tiny homes’ being advertised is that they kind of miss the point of what the ‘tiny home’ movement was all about - at least what I think it is all about, but everyone is different in their views.

For me, the small-house movement was a community of like-minded people that built their own homes and then used their experience to help others. In this for me, there were two sub-cultures - tiny homes which are built on trailers and have size and weight limitations and are also off-grid, and tiny-cottages which are houses of less than 60m2.

The important thing to me about tiny homes and cottages is that the cost is minimal, certainly not more than 50-60k all up. So when I see adverts for units that are around the 100k mark, I start thinking is this a tiny home/cottage or is it a house that has been made small.





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  Reply # 1994261 11-Apr-2018 13:53
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The challenge is you still need land and connections to utilities or provision for your own utilities where permitted) 

 

To make the most of tiny houses you really need to be able to buy small section (or share a large one).  Connection of utilities or self provision costs about the same for a tiny house as it does for big a one.

 

Friends recently connected a section North of Auckland to water and sewage for the first time and Watercare's fee was five-figures.  Then there is power.  If you are lucky fibre is free. 

 

 





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  Reply # 1994264 11-Apr-2018 14:08
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Two shipping containers welded together make a nice 65m2 single bedroom home.

 

https://www.stuff.co.nz/life-style/homed/houses/103008188/coolest-shipping-container-house-catches-everyones-eye

 

 


sxz

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  Reply # 1994277 11-Apr-2018 14:36
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I like the concept, I hate the execution.


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  Reply # 1994282 11-Apr-2018 15:05
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kryptonjohn:

 

Two shipping containers welded together make a nice 65m2 single bedroom home.

 

https://www.stuff.co.nz/life-style/homed/houses/103008188/coolest-shipping-container-house-catches-everyones-eye

 

 

That's neat.  I'd be curious to know how he has attached the cladding.  I'd weld on box section and screw into it on the exterior, but for the interior cladding you would want to avoid thermal bridging and leave space for insulation.





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  Reply # 1994287 11-Apr-2018 15:16
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If it was me I'd just frame it out inside with timber and conventionally insulate the cavities. But there's probably a more imaginative solution that does't steal so much volume.


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  Reply # 1994305 11-Apr-2018 15:55
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kryptonjohn:

 

If it was me I'd just frame it out inside with timber and conventionally insulate the cavities. But there's probably a more imaginative solution that does't steal so much volume.

 

 

How would you fix the timber to the container?

 

If you use rigid board insulation it's could be possible to get away with thinner wall cavities cf batts, and no need for dwangs.

 

If the exterior cladding is fixed to battens it may also be possible to have insulation in the exterior cavities.





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  Reply # 1994307 11-Apr-2018 15:59
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MikeAqua:

 

kryptonjohn:

 

If it was me I'd just frame it out inside with timber and conventionally insulate the cavities. But there's probably a more imaginative solution that does't steal so much volume.

 

 

How would you fix the timber to the container?

 

If you use rigid board insulation it's could be possible to get away with thinner wall cavities cf batts, and no need for dwangs.

 

If the exterior cladding is fixed to battens it may also be possible to have insulation in the exterior cavities.

 

 

Just screw fix to the metal.There's cladding on the outside so won't be visible.


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  Reply # 1994308 11-Apr-2018 16:00
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The thing is that it can be cheaper to do a new build in timber frame, than use shipping containers. Especially if you have to chop them up, and get structural engineers to make sure all the loadings are gong to be fine, as well as making sure it complies with the building code. That same house if it was in NZ, it would likely be at least double the US pricing. 


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  Reply # 1994332 11-Apr-2018 16:26
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kryptonjohn:

Two shipping containers welded together make a nice 65m2 single bedroom home.


https://www.stuff.co.nz/life-style/homed/houses/103008188/coolest-shipping-container-house-catches-everyones-eye


 



I find these interesting from an architecture point of view. The ideal of salvaging material and working with what one has is good and there is innovative use of material and structure. That’s what I think separates it from a tiny house versus a house made small.





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  Reply # 1994373 11-Apr-2018 17:05
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IMO, tiny houses risk creating trailor park settlements, which they have in the USA housing poor and vulnerable people. It appears one reason for them in NZ and for having wheels on them, is so people don't need to get a building consent, thus reducing compliance costs. But the entire purpose of building consent, is that the house is safe and healthy for the people living in it.


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  Reply # 1994394 11-Apr-2018 18:17
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I think you may be missing the point behind the idea of tiny homes (on trailers is what you are referring to).

I am not sure how you can say that they would not be safe and healthy - that seems more like a perception to me.

Personally, I think if I were building one, I would take the opportunity to follow any building codes and regulations where I could.

Also, I wouldn’t have a problem with people living in a trailer park. A community is a community and I am not one to stereotype people because of the way they choose to live.




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  Reply # 1994400 11-Apr-2018 18:43
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I could be happy in a tiny house as long as the bed is not in the "living area" have no problem with the bed area above another part of the tiny house.  People compare the size of these to those awful small apartments.  I think people would be ok with them if they are on the ground with space around them where they can open a door and have a deck they can step off onto the ground/lawn.

 

 


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  Reply # 1994410 11-Apr-2018 19:45
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I think its a good idea, as long as the Councils regulate where and how they go. So as to avoid slums, and make them a lifestyle choice. How? No real ideas, as the low income sector will also be contenders for them. 


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  Reply # 1994607 12-Apr-2018 08:39
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Speaking of tiny houses smile

 

https://www.stuff.co.nz/life-style/homed/latest/103007123/have-a-lego-replica-made-of-your-home


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