Geekzone: technology news, blogs, forums
Guest
Welcome Guest.
You haven't logged in yet. If you don't have an account you can register now.
View this topic in a long page with up to 500 replies per page Create new topic
1 | 2 | 3 | 4


32 posts

Geek
+1 received by user: 1


  Reply # 2030219 5-Jun-2018 20:39
Send private message

jonathan18:

 

We bought one last year, after seeking advice here on GZ (see this thread).

 

Ended up with a mid-range Bosch - I think this is the Bosch near the top of the Consumer recommended list, posted above, with that model 'exclusive' to HN's (this model here).

 

Wished we'd replaced our top-loading F&P way earlier; while we were initially put off by the long cycle times, we've found in reality for 80% of our loads we can use a quick setting (1 hour), and the washing and spinning is still way superior to the old machine!

 

You'll see from the thread I linked to above we were looking for a model that we can add stuff part way through a cycle - I'm sure a few brands let this do you now (and Samsung has the model with the extra 'door' to let you do this). Many don't see the value of this, but we certainly find it valuable.

 

Edit: and it's worth saying the machine we got is really quiet; it took a bit of ensuring it was well-balanced (before that it was pretty noisy!), but since then it's certainly quieter than the old top-loader. 

 

One thing to take into account is whether having the washing associated with a baby means the generally faster times of a top loader is an advantage - we used reusable nappies for our boys and so had a load or two to do most days, and I'm not sure if 2-3 hour cycles would have been practical.

 

Second edit: Note - I think most front-loaders also work off solely the cold water (heating their own water) - which is one of the reasons they take longer; if you heat your water with gas then there'll be a transfer of power usage from one to the other. (For us this was a benefit as it means we do a load most days timed for our 'hour of free power' with Electric Kiwi - as such, given most of our loads are also one hour, the only running cost is the detergent.)

 

 

 

 

Thanks that was helpful, the machine looks great. Will check this out.


779 posts

Ultimate Geek
+1 received by user: 185


  Reply # 2030276 5-Jun-2018 21:11
Send private message

kanwal13:

 

jonathan18:

 

We bought one last year, after seeking advice here on GZ (see this thread).

 

Ended up with a mid-range Bosch - I think this is the Bosch near the top of the Consumer recommended list, posted above, with that model 'exclusive' to HN's (this model here).

 

Wished we'd replaced our top-loading F&P way earlier; while we were initially put off by the long cycle times, we've found in reality for 80% of our loads we can use a quick setting (1 hour), and the washing and spinning is still way superior to the old machine!

 

You'll see from the thread I linked to above we were looking for a model that we can add stuff part way through a cycle - I'm sure a few brands let this do you now (and Samsung has the model with the extra 'door' to let you do this). Many don't see the value of this, but we certainly find it valuable.

 

Edit: and it's worth saying the machine we got is really quiet; it took a bit of ensuring it was well-balanced (before that it was pretty noisy!), but since then it's certainly quieter than the old top-loader. 

 

One thing to take into account is whether having the washing associated with a baby means the generally faster times of a top loader is an advantage - we used reusable nappies for our boys and so had a load or two to do most days, and I'm not sure if 2-3 hour cycles would have been practical.

 

Second edit: Note - I think most front-loaders also work off solely the cold water (heating their own water) - which is one of the reasons they take longer; if you heat your water with gas then there'll be a transfer of power usage from one to the other. (For us this was a benefit as it means we do a load most days timed for our 'hour of free power' with Electric Kiwi - as such, given most of our loads are also one hour, the only running cost is the detergent.)

 

 

 

 

Thanks that was helpful, the machine looks great. Will check this out.

 

 

 

 

Note that that one is only a 1200 rpm.  The increase to a 1400 rpm makes a huge change in drying time.




32 posts

Geek
+1 received by user: 1


  Reply # 2030320 5-Jun-2018 21:29
Send private message

blackjack17:

 

kanwal13:

 

jonathan18:

 

We bought one last year, after seeking advice here on GZ (see this thread).

 

Ended up with a mid-range Bosch - I think this is the Bosch near the top of the Consumer recommended list, posted above, with that model 'exclusive' to HN's (this model here).

 

Wished we'd replaced our top-loading F&P way earlier; while we were initially put off by the long cycle times, we've found in reality for 80% of our loads we can use a quick setting (1 hour), and the washing and spinning is still way superior to the old machine!

 

You'll see from the thread I linked to above we were looking for a model that we can add stuff part way through a cycle - I'm sure a few brands let this do you now (and Samsung has the model with the extra 'door' to let you do this). Many don't see the value of this, but we certainly find it valuable.

 

Edit: and it's worth saying the machine we got is really quiet; it took a bit of ensuring it was well-balanced (before that it was pretty noisy!), but since then it's certainly quieter than the old top-loader. 

 

One thing to take into account is whether having the washing associated with a baby means the generally faster times of a top loader is an advantage - we used reusable nappies for our boys and so had a load or two to do most days, and I'm not sure if 2-3 hour cycles would have been practical.

 

Second edit: Note - I think most front-loaders also work off solely the cold water (heating their own water) - which is one of the reasons they take longer; if you heat your water with gas then there'll be a transfer of power usage from one to the other. (For us this was a benefit as it means we do a load most days timed for our 'hour of free power' with Electric Kiwi - as such, given most of our loads are also one hour, the only running cost is the detergent.)

 

 

 

 

Thanks that was helpful, the machine looks great. Will check this out.

 

 

 

 

Note that that one is only a 1200 rpm.  The increase to a 1400 rpm makes a huge change in drying time.

 

 

 

 

Oh did not know that, so higher the rpm, quicker the drying time will be??


3169 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 1220

Subscriber

  Reply # 2030408 6-Jun-2018 00:02
Send private message

rb99:

wratterus:


The new F&P washer/dryer combos say up to 150PSI is fine. I assume that would be the same on a normal washer. 



In the manual its says water pressure 50-800kPa which is 7-116psi. Hope thats OK. I presume as machine is officially available in NZ its designed to cope with typical NZ water pressures (whatever they are).



Water pressures vary a lot around NZ. And around Auckland as well. Have come across a house that had 1150KPA of pressure supplied. And another with around 300KPA. And there was also a thread with someone battling Watercare, as their pressure was just over 200KPA.

For comparison, low pressure hot water is less than 150KPa. (50kpa more typical for low pressure).

Pressure limiting valves typically regulate the outlet pressure to between 400 - 500 KPA. Which is still plenty of pressure / flow from the taps on a properly designed plumbing system.

I used to have my house pump set to 500KPa, but had to turn it down to 400KPA, as that was too much pressure for me. (my pump is an inverter pump, so very easy to change the programmed outlet pressure).





1811 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 649

Trusted
Subscriber

  Reply # 2030418 6-Jun-2018 04:38
Send private message

We’ve had an LG front loader for around 5 years. It’s been excellent and hasn’t missed a beat. We’re selling it soon as we’re moving overseas but I’d buy another in a heartbeat.

3409 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 480


  Reply # 2030444 6-Jun-2018 07:12
Send private message

Re: spin speeds...

 

Read this and see if it helps clear things up.

 

 

 

https://www.whitegoodshelp.co.uk/washing-machine-spin-speed-efficiency/


310 posts

Ultimate Geek
+1 received by user: 139

Trusted

  Reply # 2030446 6-Jun-2018 07:20
Send private message

@aredwood do you have a link or model number for the pump you are using? Piqued my interest with your post above. Thanks.

3169 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 1220

Subscriber

  Reply # 2030480 6-Jun-2018 08:43
One person supports this post
Send private message

@ge0rge The pump is a DAB E sybox. https://www.dabpumps.com/en/esybox





2523 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 970

Lifetime subscriber

  Reply # 2030486 6-Jun-2018 08:53
Send private message

Aredwood:
rb99:

 

wratterus:

 

 

 

The new F&P washer/dryer combos say up to 150PSI is fine. I assume that would be the same on a normal washer. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

In the manual its says water pressure 50-800kPa which is 7-116psi. Hope thats OK. I presume as machine is officially available in NZ its designed to cope with typical NZ water pressures (whatever they are).

 



Water pressures vary a lot around NZ. And around Auckland as well. Have come across a house that had 1150KPA of pressure supplied. And another with around 300KPA. And there was also a thread with someone battling Watercare, as their pressure was just over 200KPA.

For comparison, low pressure hot water is less than 150KPa. (50kpa more typical for low pressure).

Pressure limiting valves typically regulate the outlet pressure to between 400 - 500 KPA. Which is still plenty of pressure / flow from the taps on a properly designed plumbing system.

I used to have my house pump set to 500KPa, but had to turn it down to 400KPA, as that was too much pressure for me. (my pump is an inverter pump, so very easy to change the programmed outlet pressure).
\

 

Yeah our water pipe is 500KPa on the button. Tested it (along with flow rate) because I wanted to see if I had enough pressure to run a lawn irrigation system. My plumber mate says that's at the high end of the range for Auckland City water supply pressure.

 

 


1056 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 192

Subscriber

  Reply # 2030503 6-Jun-2018 09:25
Send private message

Aredwood:
rb99:

 

wratterus:

 

 

 

The new F&P washer/dryer combos say up to 150PSI is fine. I assume that would be the same on a normal washer. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

In the manual its says water pressure 50-800kPa which is 7-116psi. Hope thats OK. I presume as machine is officially available in NZ its designed to cope with typical NZ water pressures (whatever they are).

 



Water pressures vary a lot around NZ. And around Auckland as well. Have come across a house that had 1150KPA of pressure supplied. And another with around 300KPA. And there was also a thread with someone battling Watercare, as their pressure was just over 200KPA.

For comparison, low pressure hot water is less than 150KPa. (50kpa more typical for low pressure).

Pressure limiting valves typically regulate the outlet pressure to between 400 - 500 KPA. Which is still plenty of pressure / flow from the taps on a properly designed plumbing system.

I used to have my house pump set to 500KPa, but had to turn it down to 400KPA, as that was too much pressure for me. (my pump is an inverter pump, so very easy to change the programmed outlet pressure).

 

So possibly high water pressure might be damaging the solenoids in the washing machine, and KryptonJohn says the solenoids possibly switching too quickly might be damaging the house plumbing. Yay.

 

Don't suppose there's an easy DIY way to measure incoming pressure ?





rb99


2523 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 970

Lifetime subscriber

  Reply # 2030515 6-Jun-2018 09:39
Send private message

I just got my plumber to measure it when he was in the neighbourhood which he didn't charge anything for. Otherwise borrow a water pressure gauge.

 

 


1056 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 192

Subscriber

  Reply # 2030520 6-Jun-2018 09:43
Send private message

kryptonjohn:

 

I just got my plumber to measure it when he was in the neighbourhood which he didn't charge anything for. Otherwise borrow a water pressure gauge.

 

 

 

 

Thanks, doesn't sound too exhausting.





rb99


2523 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 970

Lifetime subscriber

  Reply # 2030546 6-Jun-2018 09:48
Send private message

Oh the other thing is: Often you'll have a garden tap outside the house near where the mains comes in... that will be before the pressure limiting valve... so that should be around 300-500kpa... However inside the house the pressure should be limited to prevent pipe damage from water hammer etc. If you don't have one, it's not a big job for a plumber to put one in - definitely worth doing even if the internal water pressure is not above 300kpa as you never know if that will change in the neighbourhood supply.

 

 

 

 


399 posts

Ultimate Geek
+1 received by user: 115


  Reply # 2030550 6-Jun-2018 09:54
Send private message

What are people's opinions on the washer/dryer combos? We've been looking at the F&P WD8560F1, which can be had for around $1800 on special. Looks good on paper. 


1056 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 192

Subscriber

  Reply # 2030553 6-Jun-2018 09:56
Send private message

kryptonjohn:

 

Oh the other thing is: Often you'll have a garden tap outside the house near where the mains comes in... that will be before the pressure limiting valve... so that should be around 300-500kpa... However inside the house the pressure should be limited to prevent pipe damage from water hammer etc. If you don't have one, it's not a big job for a plumber to put one in - definitely worth doing even if the internal water pressure is not above 300kpa as you never know if that will change in the neighbourhood supply.

 

 

 

 

 

 

OK. So I guess a plumber would screw a pressure gauge to the garden tap (which does exist) and see what it says. Don't know if we have a pressure limiting valve, I presume not. There's a shut off valve where it comes on to the property (next to the garden tap funnily enough). Also some kind of valve under the hot water cylinder but thats it as far as I know.





rb99


1 | 2 | 3 | 4
View this topic in a long page with up to 500 replies per page Create new topic

Twitter »

Follow us to receive Twitter updates when new discussions are posted in our forums:



Follow us to receive Twitter updates when news items and blogs are posted in our frontpage:



Follow us to receive Twitter updates when tech item prices are listed in our price comparison site:



Geekzone Live »

Try automatic live updates from Geekzone directly in your browser, without refreshing the page, with Geekzone Live now.



Are you subscribed to our RSS feed? You can download the latest headlines and summaries from our stories directly to your computer or smartphone by using a feed reader.

Alternatively, you can receive a daily email with Geekzone updates.