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  Reply # 2089990 13-Sep-2018 13:13
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timbosan:

 


Very good point, although I thought basic back-to-back installs where closer to $500 (but a quick Google shows around $700 as the cheapest).  Wasn't it DeLonghi that did the "quick connect" heat pumps a few years ago, which where pre-charged and simply needed connecting from the indoor unit to the outdoor?  I installed one myself a few years ago.  Are they still around?

 

 

I was looking for one of those as well as they were being sold on trademe. A little while ago someone on here said they were no longer available and gave a compelling reason why they were not going to be sold anymore. I can't remember what the reason was, however, at the time I accepted it as a valid reason and that I would not be able to get one anymore.

 

A bit of searching any you may be able to find it.

 

 

 

Edit - here your go. Reason was isolation not meeting nz reg.

 

https://www.geekzone.co.nz/forums.asp?forumid=141&topicid=237647

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


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  Reply # 2090334 13-Sep-2018 21:01
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timbosan:

Batman:


Installing a heat pump is about $1000. So if you install, remove, reinstall ... how much will that cost!




Very good point, although I thought basic back-to-back installs where closer to $500 (but a quick Google shows around $700 as the cheapest).  Wasn't it DeLonghi that did the "quick connect" heat pumps a few years ago, which where pre-charged and simply needed connecting from the indoor unit to the outdoor?  I installed one myself a few years ago.  Are they still around?



Was going to suggest installing a window unit but may not be practical unless you can remove a whole opening window. The surround can be filled in with panted ply or similar.

For a hi-wall, if your landlord is okay with you painting perhaps you could cut the whole through the wall for the pipes and patch and paint when you leave. Possibly depends on the cladding, not so easy with brick. The outdoor could be powered off a plug in power lead. Unit would have to be less than 5kw to do that.

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  Reply # 2090456 14-Sep-2018 09:04
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timbosan:

 

Hi all,

Slightly different topic from all the other heat-pump topics on geekzone.  I currently rent (with an excellent landlord who is happy for me to live in the house like its my own, so I can paint, change things around, etc.)  We currently use electric heating but with such a cold winter and being in muggy Auckland we have decided to get a heat-pump, but we need one that can be moved when we move out. Some specs:

* The house is insulated (floor and ceiling) and is a single level brick and tile.
* I am looking to have this in the living area.  Lounge is 6.5m x 4m, standard height, large opening to dining / kitchen which is 6.5m x 3.

What I am wondering is are there any heat-pumps that would be better from a "easy to remove and return the house to good" again?  I assume floor units are better than high wall options as they can be free standing? Or are they screwed to the wall?

I have considered portable units but understand they are quite noisy (due to the pump being inside).

Anything else I haven't considered?

 

 

I have a Dimplex Portable Airconditioner which heats, cools and dehumidifies. Good machine and yes portable - there is a large pipe that comes out of the back of it that I simply push out of a conveniently placed cat door (which was there already)...

 

It works well - but there are pros and cons...

 

Pro - It produces a lot of heat quickly (yet to use in summer) and heats my living area quiet effectively. Obviously portable (and no install/removal costs)

 

Con - Like you said, quite noisy. The pipe could be an issue depending on where you want it. And it does occasionally need to have the water emptied out of it which is a pain.




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  Reply # 2090471 14-Sep-2018 09:34
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DaveDog:

 

timbosan:

 

Hi all,

Slightly different topic from all the other heat-pump topics on geekzone.  I currently rent (with an excellent landlord who is happy for me to live in the house like its my own, so I can paint, change things around, etc.)  We currently use electric heating but with such a cold winter and being in muggy Auckland we have decided to get a heat-pump, but we need one that can be moved when we move out. Some specs:

* The house is insulated (floor and ceiling) and is a single level brick and tile.
* I am looking to have this in the living area.  Lounge is 6.5m x 4m, standard height, large opening to dining / kitchen which is 6.5m x 3.

What I am wondering is are there any heat-pumps that would be better from a "easy to remove and return the house to good" again?  I assume floor units are better than high wall options as they can be free standing? Or are they screwed to the wall?

I have considered portable units but understand they are quite noisy (due to the pump being inside).

Anything else I haven't considered?

 

 

I have a Dimplex Portable Airconditioner which heats, cools and dehumidifies. Good machine and yes portable - there is a large pipe that comes out of the back of it that I simply push out of a conveniently placed cat door (which was there already)...

 

It works well - but there are pros and cons...

 

Pro - It produces a lot of heat quickly (yet to use in summer) and heats my living area quiet effectively. Obviously portable (and no install/removal costs)

 

Con - Like you said, quite noisy. The pipe could be an issue depending on where you want it. And it does occasionally need to have the water emptied out of it which is a pain.

 

 

@DaveDog - I would like to know more about this.  I think my options at the moment are either:

1. Portable heat pump
2. Install and leave a permanent heat-pump (in conjunction with the landlord)

How noisy is it? Can it have it in the same room as a TV? Can you leave it running overnight in the lounge and hear it in the bedroom?

What's the power consumption like?


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  Reply # 2090473 14-Sep-2018 09:37
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Our workplace gets stupidly hot in summer, so their answer was to purchase a few of these types of units. Not Dimplex, but I think perhaps LG?

 

Anyway, they never fitted some of them properly - literally sticking the outlet pipe out an open window! Even with the one they did install properly (sealing around the outlet pipe) it seemed pretty ineffective, and the noise was incredibly distracting.

 

It could well be that other models/brands are quieter/more effective than these ones, but I'd certainly be seeing if I could trial one in situ and make sure I was happy with its performance before handing over money.


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  Reply # 2090477 14-Sep-2018 09:43
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timbosan:

 

@DaveDog - I would like to know more about this.  I think my options at the moment are either:

1. Portable heat pump
2. Install and leave a permanent heat-pump (in conjunction with the landlord)

How noisy is it? Can it have it in the same room as a TV? Can you leave it running overnight in the lounge and hear it in the bedroom?

What's the power consumption like?

 

 

Have you had a conversation with the landlord as to whether he/she is willing to contribute towards  the cost of a standard (permanent) heatpump?

 

A good landlord could certainly be open to this (eg, my in-laws were happy to install one in their rental). If it keeps a current tenant happy, could well encourage them to stay longer, becomes a positive selling point when they next need to find tenants, it may well be even regarded as a decent investment.


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  Reply # 2090488 14-Sep-2018 10:06
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DaveDog:

 

I have a Dimplex Portable Airconditioner which heats, cools and dehumidifies. Good machine and yes portable - there is a large pipe that comes out of the back of it that I simply push out of a conveniently placed cat door (which was there already)...

 

It works well - but there are pros and cons...

 

Pro - It produces a lot of heat quickly (yet to use in summer) and heats my living area quiet effectively. Obviously portable (and no install/removal costs)

 

Con - Like you said, quite noisy. The pipe could be an issue depending on where you want it. And it does occasionally need to have the water emptied out of it which is a pain.

 

 

These are OK if you dont care how much power you waste. Really inefficient.

Basic science, they blow ALOT of hot air out the vent tube......
...so that means outside air is being drawn in to replace it . Alot of outside air coming in.
Its like opening a fridge door to cool the kitchen  :-)

They do work as air con. Its a micky mouse system.
Most wont work as a heat pump .
I used one at work for a while (untill it broke)  :-)

 

You used to be able to get portable split units , where the heat exchange unit can sit outside & uses a few small hoses to connect to the main
inside unit .


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  Reply # 2090491 14-Sep-2018 10:10
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timbosan:

 

DaveDog:

 

timbosan:

 

Hi all,

Slightly different topic from all the other heat-pump topics on geekzone.  I currently rent (with an excellent landlord who is happy for me to live in the house like its my own, so I can paint, change things around, etc.)  We currently use electric heating but with such a cold winter and being in muggy Auckland we have decided to get a heat-pump, but we need one that can be moved when we move out. Some specs:

* The house is insulated (floor and ceiling) and is a single level brick and tile.
* I am looking to have this in the living area.  Lounge is 6.5m x 4m, standard height, large opening to dining / kitchen which is 6.5m x 3.

What I am wondering is are there any heat-pumps that would be better from a "easy to remove and return the house to good" again?  I assume floor units are better than high wall options as they can be free standing? Or are they screwed to the wall?

I have considered portable units but understand they are quite noisy (due to the pump being inside).

Anything else I haven't considered?

 

 

I have a Dimplex Portable Airconditioner which heats, cools and dehumidifies. Good machine and yes portable - there is a large pipe that comes out of the back of it that I simply push out of a conveniently placed cat door (which was there already)...

 

It works well - but there are pros and cons...

 

Pro - It produces a lot of heat quickly (yet to use in summer) and heats my living area quiet effectively. Obviously portable (and no install/removal costs)

 

Con - Like you said, quite noisy. The pipe could be an issue depending on where you want it. And it does occasionally need to have the water emptied out of it which is a pain.

 

 

@DaveDog - I would like to know more about this.  I think my options at the moment are either:

1. Portable heat pump
2. Install and leave a permanent heat-pump (in conjunction with the landlord)

How noisy is it? Can it have it in the same room as a TV? Can you leave it running overnight in the lounge and hear it in the bedroom?

What's the power consumption like?

 

 

It is quite noisy... You can watch television with it running, but you'd certainly have to increase the volume to compensate (and if you have an issue with ambient background noise, there is the chance it would drive you crazy). It certainly isn't so loud that I can hear it from the bedroom (which shares a wall with the lounge). I think it is reasonably efficient, but that being said my power costs increased as I've gone from cold house to warm house (so nothing really to compare it to). Down the track I will be getting an installed one as I do think they're better - but this just suits a purpose.

 

Mine is in the brochure (URL below) and is the DC12RC model - I think the retail price of them is quite high, but I bought mine second hand (I wouldn't think it'd be worth paying retail price for one if I'm being honest about it).

 

https://www.dimplex.co.nz/files/downloads/Brochures/13900_HN%20Cooling2017_EMAIL.pdf


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  Reply # 2090495 14-Sep-2018 10:14
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1101:

 

DaveDog:

 

I have a Dimplex Portable Airconditioner which heats, cools and dehumidifies. Good machine and yes portable - there is a large pipe that comes out of the back of it that I simply push out of a conveniently placed cat door (which was there already)...

 

It works well - but there are pros and cons...

 

Pro - It produces a lot of heat quickly (yet to use in summer) and heats my living area quiet effectively. Obviously portable (and no install/removal costs)

 

Con - Like you said, quite noisy. The pipe could be an issue depending on where you want it. And it does occasionally need to have the water emptied out of it which is a pain.

 

 

These are OK if you dont care how much power you waste. Really inefficient.

Basic science, they blow ALOT of hot air out the vent tube......
...so that means outside air is being drawn in to replace it . Alot of outside air coming in.
Its like opening a fridge door to cool the kitchen  :-)

They do work as air con. Its a micky mouse system.
It wont work as a heat pump .
I used one at work for a while (untill it broke)  :-)

 

You used to be able to get portable split units , where the heat exchange unit can sit outside & uses a few small hoses to connect to the main
inside unit .

 

 

 

 

They state that it uses 1.48kW in return for 3.5kW of heat - that will, of course, be the best case. But I can't say I have noticed hot air being vented outside at all (it's icy cold when I have checked) but you're right - you are moving air from the room to outside in any case and the laws of physics say that the replacement air has to come from somewhere...


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