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4324 posts

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  # 2127186 15-Nov-2018 14:01
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So I'm about to embark on building a boundary fence (once I can get into dialogue with and buy-in from the neighbours!), and I already had concerns about wood warping, given I've read a decent amount about how damp it often is at purchase.

 

What's the best way to minimise this problem? I had assumed buying it a few weeks before using it, but how long before and how should it be stored to best dry it (and also avoid it bowing while drying)?

 

Thanks.


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Master Geek


  # 2127203 15-Nov-2018 14:10
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buy decent quality timber, idea either paint or oil the wood and that should stop it from warping like in the picture,


 
 
 
 


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  # 2127212 15-Nov-2018 14:16
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jonathan18:

So I'm about to embark on building a boundary fence (once I can get into dialogue with and buy-in from the neighbours!), and I already had concerns about wood warping, given I've read a decent amount about how damp it often is at purchase.


What's the best way to minimise this problem? I had assumed buying it a few weeks before using it, but how long before and how should it be stored to best dry it (and also avoid it bowing while drying)?


Thanks.



Wood takes a fair time to dry (months with good ventilation just to bring it down to a reasonable level) but the more moisture you can get out of it the better.

If you have dried it somewhat you can see how it is warping and build it to compensate in the same way framers check the warp on timber so all the studs are going the same way.

1022 posts

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  # 2127216 15-Nov-2018 14:24
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jonathan18:

 

So I'm about to embark on building a boundary fence (once I can get into dialogue with and buy-in from the neighbours!), and I already had concerns about wood warping, given I've read a decent amount about how damp it often is at purchase.

 

What's the best way to minimise this problem? I had assumed buying it a few weeks before using it, but how long before and how should it be stored to best dry it (and also avoid it bowing while drying)?

 

Thanks.

 

 

I reckon if you do post and rail, is to have the rails between the posts and set the rails level with the back edge of the post (depending on what thickness paling you're using) so you have the post exposed on the paling side about 30mm. It really breaks up the continuous look of palings all the way plus it means everything is not hanging off one side of the post.

 

 


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  # 2127217 15-Nov-2018 14:25
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Paul1977:

 

The problem with packing the gap is that I was planning to mount a retractable hose reel on the post, so would much rather have it straight.

 

 

As well as packing the fence side, see if the builder will taper you a piece of 4*2 to be fixed on your  side of the post to allow you to mount the hosereel close to vertical...


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  # 2127229 15-Nov-2018 14:40
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wellygary:

Paul1977:


The problem with packing the gap is that I was planning to mount a retractable hose reel on the post, so would much rather have it straight.



As well as packing the fence side, see if the builder will taper you a piece of 4*2 to be fixed on your  side of the post to allow you to mount the hosereel close to vertical...



IMO that’s a very good, practical idea. If it was my fence, that’s what I would do. It may also allow you to adjust the wedge if the post moves further.




Sometimes I just sit and think. Other times I just sit.


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  # 2127239 15-Nov-2018 14:52
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Google replacing a fence post. I think Mitre 10 or Bunnings did a demo video. It's not that hard from the looks of it, so should be even easier for a qualified builder.

 

 


 
 
 
 


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  # 2127240 15-Nov-2018 14:58
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Thanks for the advice.

 

My problem is that we have concrete posts in place for the current fence, and there are only holes for two sets of railings. I'm sticking with 1.5m palings to minimise the amount above the top railing (the current palings are about 1.6m, and I'm thinking 1.8 is too tall relative to the railings), and I'm planning on using 25mm thick palings, plus will cap the top.

 

Is there anything else I can do to try to minimise a dodgy end product from warping wood etc?


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Master Geek


  # 2127245 15-Nov-2018 15:15
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jonathan18:

Thanks for the advice.


My problem is that we have concrete posts in place for the current fence, and there are only holes for two sets of railings. I'm sticking with 1.5m palings to minimise the amount above the top railing (the current palings are about 1.6m, and I'm thinking 1.8 is too tall relative to the railings), and I'm planning on using 25mm thick palings, plus will cap the top.


Is there anything else I can do to try to minimise a dodgy end product from warping wood etc?



The concrete posts should help to keep the fence straight. Put the railings on so they are bending the same way, all wood will have a natural warp. Both bending out away from the posts looks better, IMHO.

Put the top cap on soon after you have finished the pailings else warping can make them a bugger to get on.



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  # 2127248 15-Nov-2018 15:18
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Suckerpunch:

 

Google replacing a fence post. I think Mitre 10 or Bunnings did a demo video. It's not that hard from the looks of it, so should be even easier for a qualified builder.

 

 

Dead easy once the old one is out, but I wouldn't want to be the one trying to get the old post out with a huge lump of concrete on the end of it!

 

We'll see what he says, but I certainly wouldn't blame him if that isn't his first choice.


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  # 2127253 15-Nov-2018 15:39
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Paul1977:

Suckerpunch:


Google replacing a fence post. I think Mitre 10 or Bunnings did a demo video. It's not that hard from the looks of it, so should be even easier for a qualified builder.



Dead easy once the old one is out, but I wouldn't want to be the one trying to get the old post out with a huge lump of concrete on the end of it!


We'll see what he says, but I certainly wouldn't blame him if that isn't his first choice.



If the old post is dug out, you’ll end up with much bigger hole than the original - then that needs to be filled with concrete to support the new post.

If you wanted to put the new post in a new hole in a slightly different position, it is very difficult to dig the hole close enough to the fence to get the post in the correct position.




Sometimes I just sit and think. Other times I just sit.




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  # 2127270 15-Nov-2018 15:57
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eracode: 

 

If you wanted to put the new post in a new hole in a slightly different position, it is very difficult to dig the hole close enough to the fence to get the post in the correct position.

 

Plus it would be spaced differently to all the others, so not really an option as far as I'm concerned.


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  # 2127410 15-Nov-2018 18:26
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Just finished painting a 1.2 x 29.5 mtr driveway fence built in approx 1999. It was originally painted in a terracotta/rust colour with white posts. All the wood was prepainted before construction. It has a concrete mow strip under the entire length (before the driveway was put in). A previous neighbor on the other side had repainted their side black at some point.

 

Over the intervening 19 years my sides paint had faded and/or come away. Though the white posts were in good nick. After water blasting all the black mold and lichen off there was still quite bit of red left. So treated the fence with an anti-fungal wash and proceeded to paint it Accent Forrest Green which is Mitre10 home brand paint from Wattyl ($99/10ltr). The first coat just soaked it in. The second did a nice seal coat. Used 15 ltr's. With the white posts 1 coat of white. Affixed 4 white solar wall lights ($29.80ea from Mitre10) along its length as my side is our driveway.

 

The new neighbor has just built approx 50 mtr berm & driveway fence to edge of house (no mow strip whipper sniper time) to keep the youngins in the front yard and has stained his black. He used 50 ltrs both sides spraying it on. He has only done one quite thin (see through) coat. Stated he lost a third spraying it and would never spray again. He has had to put a length of fishing line along the top to stop birds alighting and then pooing down on to the black. Black with white splashes not a nice sight.

 

What is it with black fences these days ??? Is it the new mission brown ???

 

Anyway my fence is still pretty solid and hopefully will remain so for another 20 years.

 

 





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  # 2127458 15-Nov-2018 19:31
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Fencing timber is cheap because it's garbage. It will usually warp and twist to some degree.

If you need something to stay straight, fence and deck timber should be the very last on the list of options.




Location: Dunedin

 


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  # 2127564 15-Nov-2018 21:50
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We put several kilometres of fencing in last year. It's sheep netting and barbed wire, but there are a lot of fence posts. So far, none of them look any different from the day they were driven in. I wonder if sawing the wood contributes to the the issue?






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