Geekzone: technology news, blogs, forums
Guest
Welcome Guest.
You haven't logged in yet. If you don't have an account you can register now.


View this topic in a long page with up to 500 replies per page Create new topic
1 | 2 

neb

734 posts

Ultimate Geek
+1 received by user: 129

Lifetime subscriber

  Reply # 2129541 19-Nov-2018 16:02
Send private message quote this post

mattwnz:

I would also suggest security stays on each side, which are screwed into the inside of the frame so not visible. That prevents them being opened too far, and you can also get ones that are removable.

 

 

Does anyone have a recommendation for a particular stay of the many different types available? We've got a few windows with these scissor-style stays, but I'm wondering how resistant this type and others like the ones with notches where you can vary the opening size really are to just being unscrewed.

3065 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 900

Subscriber

  Reply # 2129552 19-Nov-2018 16:23
Send private message quote this post

neb:
mattwnz:

 

I would also suggest security stays on each side, which are screwed into the inside of the frame so not visible. That prevents them being opened too far, and you can also get ones that are removable.

 

Does anyone have a recommendation for a particular stay of the many different types available? We've got a few windows with these scissor-style stays, but I'm wondering how resistant this type and others like the ones with notches where you can vary the opening size really are to just being unscrewed.

 

 

 

I have installed a number of the scissor-style stays at home - I pop-riveted them in place and they're very strong. Very easy to do.


 
 
 
 


14454 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 1904


  Reply # 2129614 19-Nov-2018 17:17
Send private message quote this post

These ones are potentially better because you can detach them with a key. eg incase you want to open the window more, or need to get out of a window in an emergency etc. 

 

 

 

https://www.joineryhardware.co.nz/shop-door-window-security-hardware.html?id=1270-detachable-restrictor-stay




18784 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 5385

Trusted
Lifetime subscriber

  Reply # 2129615 19-Nov-2018 17:19
Send private message quote this post

It's funny the tricks your mind plays on you sometimes. I would have sworn on a stack of bibles earlier today, we had two fittings per window. Turns out there is only one, right in the middle, so either fitting type will work perfectly. 

 

 




18784 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 5385

Trusted
Lifetime subscriber

  Reply # 2129617 19-Nov-2018 17:21
Send private message quote this post

mattwnz:

 

These ones are potentially better because you can detach them with a key. eg incase you want to open the window more, or need to get out of a window in an emergency etc. 

 

 

 

https://www.joineryhardware.co.nz/shop-door-window-security-hardware.html?id=1270-detachable-restrictor-stay

 

 

 

 

Ours are similar to this, however, we have just removed them from at least 1 set of Windows in each room, so that in the event of a fire, our kids can get out of the house, onto the roof outside, and hopefully down to the ground floor, if God forbid the hallway wasn't accessible or safe for them.

 

 


14454 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 1904


  Reply # 2129664 19-Nov-2018 17:24
Send private message quote this post

networkn:

 

mattwnz:

 

These ones are potentially better because you can detach them with a key. eg incase you want to open the window more, or need to get out of a window in an emergency etc. 

 

 

 

https://www.joineryhardware.co.nz/shop-door-window-security-hardware.html?id=1270-detachable-restrictor-stay

 

 

 

 

Ours are similar to this, however, we have just removed them from at least 1 set of Windows in each room, so that in the event of a fire, our kids can get out of the house, onto the roof outside, and hopefully down to the ground floor, if God forbid the hallway wasn't accessible or safe for them.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ironically I think they are required on new windows in new builds in certain places, for health and safety to prevent the risk of falling out out them. 




18784 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 5385

Trusted
Lifetime subscriber

  Reply # 2129684 19-Nov-2018 17:31
One person supports this post
Send private message quote this post

mattwnz:

 

Ironically I think they are required on new windows in new builds in certain places, for health and safety to prevent the risk of falling out out them. 

 

 

Yes. Interestingly our house brand new at the time we bought it, didn't have any, and we added them because our daughter is.. precocious and we were worried we would find her on the roof when we weren't looking. Having said that, during a fire education session we do with our kids each few months to keep them fresh on the plan, it occured to me that they would not be able to get out, and now they are a little older, them climbing out when they aren't supposed to is less of an issue. 

 

Ironically, another few years we might want them locked in again lol.

 

I don't think a key is really an option because in a fire, the chances of finding a key and using it effectively could be a problem.

 

 


939 posts

Ultimate Geek
+1 received by user: 39


  Reply # 2132329 23-Nov-2018 04:49
Send private message quote this post

These ones are potentially better because you can detach them with a key. eg incase you want to open the window more, or need to get out of a window in an emergency etc. 

 

 

 

https://www.joineryhardware.co.nz/shop-door-window-security-hardware.html?id=1270-detachable-restrictor-stay

 

 

This looks better quality

 

 

https://www.joineryhardware.co.nz/shop-door-window-security-hardware.html?id=639-yale-guardian-securistay-aluminium-window

 

 

They're not a security stay if they can be unscrewed by someone outside. Rivets anyone?

 

 

Those latches with the wedge that flips down are hopeless I have found, as they can just break off. You just need the latch not quite fully open when you close it, and it hits the frame as the window closes and snaps off the hinges. I have seen a lot these type missing the flip down wedge after it is come off. It is also possibily partly due to them not being installed correctly, leaving enough room for the wedge to get past the frame if it is slightly out. You could look at something like the Stella Window vented option on https://www.fairviewwindows.co.nz/doors/accessories/hardware , as these don't use a separate wedge, it is part of the handle itself. I am guessing other manufacturers do something similar which you can buy.

 

 

I'd bet they can be opened from outside.

2020 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 1131


  Reply # 2132334 23-Nov-2018 06:11
Send private message quote this post

For security, the double tongue ones open to the second tongue, are as good as just leaving the window open. You can flick them open with any ruler or similar device.

You should save your money, and just open the windows, unless you have a good non security reason for changing them.




Location: Dunedin

665 posts

Ultimate Geek
+1 received by user: 116


  Reply # 2136989 30-Nov-2018 08:14
Send private message quote this post

neb:  if you're in a house from the 1970s or 80s then the window handles are typically (a) incredibly flimsy to start with and (b) worn out/corroded and very loose, .

 

 I had an 80s house with those.

 

Flimsy yes...

 

We had some open 24/7, 365 days mostly.

 

We had those security hinges on them, and they were open fully, not enough to fit a kids head through.

 

Never got burgled in 8 years of living there.

 

 


neb

734 posts

Ultimate Geek
+1 received by user: 129

Lifetime subscriber

  Reply # 2137224 30-Nov-2018 13:23
Send private message quote this post

networkn:

Having said that, during a fire education session we do with our kids each few months to keep them fresh on the plan, it occured to me that they would not be able to get out

 

 

Yeah, that's an important factor, I only have stays on windows where there's an exit close by, not on any windows where they're the only exit from the room apart from the door into the interior of the house. Having said that you can get ones that you can unhook to let the window open completely, but I'm not sure how practical that is in the presence of fire and smoke.

238 posts

Master Geek
+1 received by user: 8


  Reply # 2137267 30-Nov-2018 14:14
Send private message quote this post

andrewNZ: For security, the double tongue ones open to the second tongue, are as good as just leaving the window open. You can flick them open with any ruler or similar device.

You should save your money, and just open the windows, unless you have a good non security reason for changing them.

 

Yea - it's weird they don't make the double tongue ones lockable like this: https://www.joineryhardware.co.nz/shop-aluminium-window-handles.html?id=357-locking-face-fix-wedgeless-rh

 

(I went looking for lockable double ones a while back and never found any - maybe someone else has found some?)


14454 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 1904


  Reply # 2137270 30-Nov-2018 14:18
Send private message quote this post

Aren't the double tounge ones for securing the window so it doesn't blow open or closed. When discussing security with a window manufacturer, (not that they were particularly knowledgeable)  they said that if someone wants to get in, they will just smash the glass anyway. Also a double tongue one that locks could possibly just be pulled open bending the tongue anyway.


1 | 2 
View this topic in a long page with up to 500 replies per page Create new topic



Twitter »

Follow us to receive Twitter updates when new discussions are posted in our forums:



Follow us to receive Twitter updates when news items and blogs are posted in our frontpage:



Follow us to receive Twitter updates when tech item prices are listed in our price comparison site:



Geekzone Live »

Try automatic live updates from Geekzone directly in your browser, without refreshing the page, with Geekzone Live now.


Geekzone Live »

Our community of supporters help make Geekzone possible. Click the button below to join them.

Support Geezone on PressPatron



Are you subscribed to our RSS feed? You can download the latest headlines and summaries from our stories directly to your computer or smartphone by using a feed reader.

Alternatively, you can receive a daily email with Geekzone updates.