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2 posts

Wannabe Geek
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Topic # 243629 21-Dec-2018 16:12
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Hello everyone

 

I've bought a NZ rental property that has a separate gas cook top/hob and oven setup - the hob is above the oven but is separate. Both the appliances are wrecked and will be replaced. I want to get rid of the gas altogether and put in a smooth electric hob for ease of cleaning (not induction however). The question is, is the cable that supplies the electric oven likely to be of sufficient capaicity to run both oven and hob? The existing 3-core feed cable is about 10mm across and 5mm thick. It is 240V.

 

Thoughts?

 

 

 

 


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3560 posts

Uber Geek
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  Reply # 2148950 21-Dec-2018 16:21
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Off the top of my head I would say "nope"

 

What sore of plug  has the oven got?

 

A couple of elements plus the oven running is certainly likely to exceed the specs for a 20amp circuit....

 

A free standing range  usually has a 30amp plug and a runs on a dedicated circuit....

 

Consult a sparky to see what the wiring and fuse box set up is....


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Uber Geek
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  Reply # 2148984 21-Dec-2018 17:18
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I think you'd need a separate run of 6mm2 wiring for each of them. A sparky would be able to advise you.


 
 
 
 


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Master Geek
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  Reply # 2149010 21-Dec-2018 18:37
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You will likely need separate 4mm2 or 6mm2 subcircuits to each. If the existing is 6mm2 it may be possible to feed both. Really depends on specs of the appliances and exactly what size cable is there. Sounds like you need to consult a sparky.


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  Reply # 2149028 21-Dec-2018 19:15
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HondaCivicguy:

 

Hello everyone

 

I've bought a NZ rental property that has a separate gas cook top/hob and oven setup - the hob is above the oven but is separate. Both the appliances are wrecked and will be replaced. I want to get rid of the gas altogether and put in a smooth electric hob for ease of cleaning (not induction however). The question is, is the cable that supplies the electric oven likely to be of sufficient capaicity to run both oven and hob? The existing 3-core feed cable is about 10mm across and 5mm thick. It is 240V.

 

Thoughts?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Short answer is no (the cable should have the cable size printed on it every meter), and before you ask, you will need to get this done by an electrician as because this is a rental you cannot do any electrical work under the homeowner exemption.

 

 


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  Reply # 2149043 21-Dec-2018 19:35
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Stick with gas. Lots of tenants prefer gas cooking. No worries with the glass top getting smashed or scratched. Gas hobs are often cheaper to buy.

And no need to spend big $$$ on upgrading the cables to support the extra load. Which could be extremely expensive if you need to upgrade the mains cable to the street.





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  Reply # 2149063 21-Dec-2018 20:51
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Induction hobs are awesome, but you need the right cookware.





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Wannabe Geek
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  Reply # 2149065 21-Dec-2018 20:57
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Thanks for that. I will get an electrician involved but I suspect I will have to continue with the gas hob. 

 

Induction is certainly, in my opinion, the ultimate. However, as far as 'special' pans are concerned, you only need to have ones that are ferrous as in contain iron or steel. Any pan that a magnet will stick to will work on induction. No aluminium, no copper, no glass.


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