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mdf



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Topic # 243736 29-Dec-2018 11:20
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We get plenty of leaves and other crud in our gutters. Pohutukawa blossoms are a real pain. I've tried using the flat black mesh stuff that you bend in, but have found that it just blows loose eventually.

 

Any experience with either the pre formed lengths or whiskers? Whiskers will be super expensive by the time I do the whole house and garage but might be the most reliable option?


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IcI

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  Reply # 2151829 29-Dec-2018 12:16
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Interested in others experience too.

 

Sorry, I have no advice to offer





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  Reply # 2151833 29-Dec-2018 12:31
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I just did my place. Westminster Gutter Brush. 4 pack for $20 from the Warehouse. So far so good. I had birds getting into my roof. No longer an issue.

 
 
 
 


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  Reply # 2152338 30-Dec-2018 17:23
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Interested in this topic as well - my neighbours trees (leaves and pine needles) continually clog my gutters, to the point where it causes them to overflow significantly in Auckland downpours.

 

Whiskers had no real impact, placed them around as much of the accessible guttering as I could, but it just caused the pine needles to form dams in the gutters themselves as they got blocked up by the whiskers in the gutter.

 

I'm not certain there's any form of gutter shield that would solve my problem, bar getting the neighbours trees cut down - might have to work on that...


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  Reply # 2152339 30-Dec-2018 17:27
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The gutter blocker stuff isn't bad, birds break through it after a bit though. 

 

 

 

Depending on how treey your housing situation is, kinda needs to be cleared still pretty often..





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  Reply # 2152342 30-Dec-2018 17:53
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I would have thought they would “leave” by their own accord?

Maybe in the new year, one can turn over a new leaf.




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  Reply # 2152381 30-Dec-2018 19:58
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Have a google search for bushfire gutter protection in Oz.

 

Some places here it's mandatory.

 

It'll keep out leaves.


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  Reply # 2152842 1-Jan-2019 09:37
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Complete waste of time.

 

dust/dirt can still make its way into the gutter, along with seeds.

 

Sure leaves can not get in, but you will find that weeds will grow instead and they are much more of a problem.

 

Anything you put in place to try and stop the leaves only makes it much harder to clean the weeds out.

 

 

 

The solution, wash the gutters out every 3-4 months


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  Reply # 2152867 1-Jan-2019 10:41
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TwoSeven: I would have thought they would “leave” by their own accord?

Maybe in the new year, one can turn over a new leaf.


I had a pine tree that had needles about twice the length of the usual Radiata variety. They were long enough to jam in the downpipe if it had any bends. I had considered cutting it down and its fate was sealed when the neighbour's new house had a the gutter along the front fill up with water and fall off.

On our place there's a downpipe at each end of the gutters so you can go to the middle and clean to both ends rather than pushing it all one way.

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  Reply # 2152938 1-Jan-2019 13:22
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just caused the pine needles to form dams in the gutters themselves as they got blocked up by the whiskers in the gutter.

 

I'm not certain there's any form of gutter shield that would solve my problem,

 

 

yep. This. And the smaller leaves, they break down and you get sludge, now that's easy to get up and blast out, but not if you have those gutter products blocking your way.

 

 

 

Really just clean them out once or twice a year.


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  Reply # 2152963 1-Jan-2019 15:35
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Our house is three years old and was fitted with whiskers when we bought it. Because the whiskers do not fully fill the spouting, leaves etc still get down between the whiskers and the spouting and get stuck there. They stay damp, then rot and you get sludge under the whiskers. Leaves are meant to sit on top but they don’t - great in theory but a total waste of time.

A year ago I ripped it all out and replaced it with gutter foam - which I installed myself. It’s important to get the correct profile (cross-section) of foam to match the profile of your guttering. If you get that right and instal it carefully, the foam fills the spouting closely and there’s nowhere for leaves to get stuck. They sit on top of the foam and when it stops raining, they dry off and blow away. Great in theory again - but this theory actually works.


These shots are from the website of the place where I bought the foam - not our house but ours looks just like this:



 



 


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  Reply # 2153880 3-Jan-2019 14:34
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We had issues with manuka leaves.  They are tiny leaves when dry, but surprisingly good at forming dams in gutters and blocking downpipe inlets as well. I tried the whiskers, which were useless.  

 

Next I tried a fine screened mesh.  It worked but leaves built up on top of the mesh and had to be removed periodically.  I made a tool for this using an old window cleaning brush.





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  Reply # 2153888 3-Jan-2019 14:42
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In short - nothing works 100%, apart from getting rid of all trees. As others have said, anything that is small needle like or forms dense mats of material. (macrocarpa trees are another problem example). Will simply bypass or build up on whatever barrier that you install.

Get rid of the trees. And plenty of fall on the gutters, to help the water move faster.





mdf



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  Reply # 2153895 3-Jan-2019 15:01
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So over the course of a week I have tried pretty much every gutter guard product available from Bunnings (lots of to-ing and fro-ing).

 

Whiskers/bristles: Pros: Quick and easy to install. Effective against leaves. Cons: Expensive. Ineffective against pohutukawa blossoms (and I suspect pine needles).

 

Clip on gutter guards: Pros: Cheapish. Cons: Fiddly to install. Likely requires quite a bit of cutting. Leaves black clips showing along gutters (who has black gutters!?).

 

Pre-formed mesh: Pros: Heavy duty. Quick and easy to install if you have external clips holding up your gutters. Cons: Expensive. Very fiddly to install if you have internal gutter clips.

 

Roll of bendable mesh (cheap, low quality stuff. My local Bunnings has $1 a roll stuff but that doesn't seem to be online). Pros: Very cheap. Will require cutting for internal gutter clips, but easy as the plastic is thin. Cons: Didn't stay fitted particularly well.

 

Roll of bendable mesh ("premium"). Pros: Cheap. Seems to stay fitted much better than cheap stuff. Cons: Still fiddly to install, just less fiddly than most others. I tried a couple of ways of installing this. First method 3 (which requires less cutting around the internal gutter clips) but had some pop outs at the rolled edge so shifted to method 2:

 

 

This last option is what I have gone with for most of the gutters.

 

Had a look at the foam stuff online. I suspect this would be great if you have external gutter clips but another pain for internal clips.

 

As for most things, the effectiveness and ease of installation depends on your roofline and gutters, particularly how they are installed. I certainly found navigating the internal clips to be an annoyance to be negotiated around.

 

In hindsight, I might have been better off looking at a leaf/debris diverter system for the downpipes. That can perhaps wait for next summer...


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  Reply # 2153908 3-Jan-2019 15:24
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Also be careful, as a lot of those systems can damage roofing iron, due to causing wet leaves to constantly sit on the iron. And there is also a risk that water might overflow over the top of the barge board, and into your house.





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  Reply # 2155441 6-Jan-2019 20:41
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I get on to a lot of roofs and see these systems in use a lot. 

 

The most popular is the mesh guard which works best when professionally installed - not when bent into a U shape. That is riveted or stuck to the roof and gutter edge to make a smooth surface. 

 

The brush stuff i hate looking at - its always full of icky gunk, leaves get trapped in it. 

 

The mesh guard, leaves just land on it and slide off when it rains or is windy. 





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